EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Thoughts on Tails on a Big Mountain / Powder Ski
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Thoughts on Tails on a Big Mountain / Powder Ski

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
What are people's feelings on straight tail vs twin tip on a big mountain / powder ski?

I'm looking for a nice powder ski that handles well when things get cruddy, since I can't make it for the fresh pow every single time. Would also be nice to have something that plays nice when I re-join friends who stayed on-piste in the groomers while the rest of us played in the deep stuff.

Been eying down the K2 Sidestash, with its straight tail.
- Will I gain anything from having a twin tip setup even if I don't plan on riding switch?
- How critical is the straight tail for stability on the groomers?
- Any thoughts on tail design with respect to moguls?
- Any other skis I should be considering?

Thanks everyone!
post #2 of 14
IMO, the biggest place you're going to miss a straight tail is on big landings. 

-You will gain quickness from turn-to-turn with a twin tip. You will also gain billy-goat/side-slip ability in tighter terrain. 
-You won't lose a huge amount of 'recreational' carving ability. But race skis aren't twins. 
-I don't ski moguls. 
-There are a dozen other skis to consider, all of us are biased for various reasons so I won't start that debate. 

If you are debating your tail, then you have to ask yourself where this ski is in your quiver. A Big Mountain ski or a Tree ski. (both are powder skis) My Maven is a Japan Tree God. But I probably wouldn't even have it in my quiver if I was living in other mountains. 

Many BM skiers hate twin tails because they don't stomp landings very well. But, if you look at the podium from the Revelstoke comp, you won't see any flat tails. So, go with your gut. 

Telluride__2010_wight_3183.jpg

http://store.mobilerider.com/flash/player/index.php?vendor_id=104&video_id=26845
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
-You will gain quickness from turn-to-turn with a twin tip. You will also gain billy-goat/side-slip ability in tighter terrain. 
-You won't lose a huge amount of 'recreational' carving ability. But race skis aren't twins. 
These are exactly the kind of comments I was looking for. Thanks for your response!

Yeah, did not mean to initiate a flame-war regarding brand/model loyalty. That being said, if anyone feels strongly about something they have in their own quiver which is appropriate to this topic, I would love to hear what they have to say!
post #4 of 14
The twin-tip tail is just one of many factors in a skis performance and one that is much less important than flex, torsional stiffness, sidecut, width, dampening.....  I don't even take it into consideration when buying skis.  The biggest advantage to a twin-tip tail for me is it allows me to go back up easily when I get into a place I don't want to be.  Trying to traverse backwards in deep powder with a conventional tail can be tricky and tiring.
post #5 of 14
just got a set of pontoons with the rockered pintail...looking forward to see how they perform going forward and backwards...lets hope the tails dont sink eh? im hoping because of the rocker they wont? we shall see
post #6 of 14
Ya'll missed the most important feature of the twin tip - the ability to spray big fat rooster tails in the faces of your buddies behind you.
post #7 of 14
i was talking with a tech in the shop when buying my prophet 90's. he argued that the twin tip will be more forgiving in the bumps when you let youir  weight get back, you won't experience as harsh of a "kick" as you would with straight tails. sadly there were no moguls around when I demo-ed the ski, so i can't personally attest to this...
post #8 of 14
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the Pontoon design, by definition, meant to allow the tails to sink so that the tip always floats?..


Quote:
Originally Posted by CallumBC View Post

just got a set of pontoons with the rockered pintail...looking forward to see how they perform going forward and backwards...lets hope the tails dont sink eh? im hoping because of the rocker they wont? we shall see
post #9 of 14
I ski the Sixth Sense in the 115 waist for powder. thought the twin tip would be noticable or wierd. It isn't. I don't even know it's there. And I was way biased against ever skiing a twin tip initially. as said, other performance characteristics outweigh that concern.
post #10 of 14
I am on my first-ever twin - Big Troubles,  and I agree that the twin tip tail is a non-issue.  the only drawback for me has been when stopped,  I sometimes seem to tangle my tails.  Oh,  and wedging up a climb is a bit awkward,  though doable.

AM.
post #11 of 14
Quote: Originally Posted by Vinski 
 
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the Pontoon design, by definition, meant to allow the tails to sink so that the tip always floats?..

no thats right, but they also boast around 10cm of rocker on the tail...so its got me wandering. perhaps the rocker keeps the tails above the pow when flat but when the ski is tilted back and turned the tip will slice into the pow?
 
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attacking Mid View Post

I am on my first-ever twin - Big Troubles... the only drawback for me has been when stopped,  I sometimes seem to tangle my tails.

It's not just you.  I seem to do that too, and it happens more than the other twips I've had.  Must be the shapes of those specific tails.

Wonderful skis otherwise, though.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

The twin-tip tail is just one of many factors in a skis performance and one that is much less important than flex, torsional stiffness, sidecut, width, dampening.....  I don't even take it into consideration when buying skis.  The biggest advantage to a twin-tip tail for me is it allows me to go back up easily when I get into a place I don't want to be.  Trying to traverse backwards in deep powder with a conventional tail can be tricky and tiring.

+1

If you're doing hairy lines, having the twin tip to easily back up is a big win. Just this last weekend I was at Vail in one of the stashes that has some gnarly cliffs nestled in the trees. After coming out of the trees at the entrance, I found that I couldn't drop the line because of serious snow-scraping done by someone else uncovering all sorts of gnar. I side-stepped up and with the twin-tips I easily backed up a little to line up another drop on the other side of a tree at the entrance ramp.

After having had flat tails for my entire previous ski-life, I could tell it otherwise would have been a very dangerous spot to back up. If my tail had sunk in, it would have thrown me off balance, likely causing me to loose an edge on the very steep entrance, sliding over gnar, possibly tumbling over the line and possibly into the trees. This isn't just when backing up. When doing jump-turns on steeps (say, 3' jump turns), if you don't have your balance perfect, you can slide forward/back a bit. If you slide back a bit and your tails sink, again, you can loose balance which can cause you to loose edge-hold, sending you sliding over gnar. I'm sure these reasons play a role in why you see the pros on twin-tips in that podium pic.

After a few experiences like the above, I feel a lot more comfortable on twin-tips when on an exposed line.
Edited by Brian Lindahl - 3/8/10 at 3:47pm
post #14 of 14
I've also found twin tips easier in moguls and while billy-goating around.  Where do you normally ski so we can give more recommendations?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Thoughts on Tails on a Big Mountain / Powder Ski