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Does anybody use long skinny skis anymore?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I feel a bit like Rip Van Winkle. Cleaning out the attic I found two new pairs of skis that I bought after my last knee operation in the mid 90s, I had not skied since. The skis are set of 205 Fishers and 200 cm  K2s. I'm too old, fat and weak kneed to ski any more, a ligament in my knee mended but it is stretched so I have a wobbly knee, but the wife says I ought to try. I see on ebay all short fat skis. I think nobody can get any speed with those little things, then turn on the Olympics that watch the down hills folks setting new records with fat little skis. When I skied I skied more off trail then Piste only because I had strong legs and a weak mind. Now I only have a weak mind. So my question is am I still allowed on the slopes with skinny skis and are Look Nevada bindings still allowed. I'm probably going to be sking on the Bunny Hill with the little girls.
post #2 of 24
Yeah I see lots of people skiing on old straight skis...You should really try out the new shaped skis though. They are so much better.
post #3 of 24
Bode Miller skied on really long skinny skis when he got the bronze yesterday.
post #4 of 24
20091218_Miller_head.jpg
Like these??? Those are shaped skis brotha...
post #5 of 24
You can check out the More Retro memories???? for a stroll down memory lane. Lots of the people that post there ski the old skis. They might even enjoy taking what you have off your hands.

I skied on some Atomic Heli Guides 200cm circa 1990 (78 mm waist) last weekend. Not the best ski I've been on lately, but it is fun.
post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier232 View Post

20091218_Miller_head.jpg
Like these??? Those are shaped skis brotha...

If you call a 45m radius ski 'shaped', ok. They do have more side cut than in early days, but shaped? Not really.
post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post




If you call a 45m radius ski 'shaped', ok. They do have more side cut than in early days, but shaped? Not really.
 

   It was a little more of a joke...Even straight skis have some shape just not the same as shaped skis.
post #8 of 24
I couldn't see you smirking when you typed.
post #9 of 24
I plan to take a couple "just for kicks" runs on 204s this Saturday night
IMG_2177.jpg

But, Sunday when it is time to really shred the nasty, rutted  and icy steeps, I'll be on something post 2005 model and sub 190 cm for sure.
By the way, I really dug Bode's black studded velcro ski tie strap.  Anybody know where to get those?
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pooch View Post

I feel a bit like Rip Van Winkle. Cleaning out the attic I found two new pairs of skis ... The skis are set of 205 Fishers and 200 cm  K2s. I'm too old, fat and weak kneed to ski any more, a ligament in my knee mended but it is stretched so I have a wobbly knee, but the wife says I ought to try.
...So my question is am I still allowed on the slopes with skinny skis and are Look Nevada bindings still allowed. I'm probably going to be sking on the Bunny Hill with the little girls.

so I guess you have a great insurance policy?  whoz the beneficiary?

hey, itz all good. I'd just come up for the bait and let the wife set the hook.
crazy thought... you might have a bunch of fun and fool her completely!

Eddy would go...
post #11 of 24
 I slip courses with my 205 SG's from 1997. Don't trust them enough to actually ski them at real speed, although I did get them up to ~50 MPH the other day with no incident.
post #12 of 24
I'll ski with you!

I've seen all sorts of skis on the slopes..My favorites are the really retro people with the straight skis, rear entry white Nordicas, and the dayglo parkas....80s represent!
post #13 of 24
Yeah, Look Nevada's, a great idea, maybe you will have matching knees.
post #14 of 24
I still occasionally ski on long skinny skis:



post #15 of 24
I occasionally ski long skinny skis too.  It's just easier to make short turns, and slow speed turns, on the new short radius skis.
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by csavage View Post

I'll ski with you!

I've seen all sorts of skis on the slopes..My favorites are the really retro people with the straight skis, rear entry white Nordicas, and the dayglo parkas....80s represent!

 

  Oh I saw this guy at Cannon not too long ago. He was wearing a very retro red one piece. He had grey rear entry boots( also looked retro) And he wasnt skiing with a helmet or goggles. He didn't really look like a gaper he just looked kinda out of place lol
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pooch View Post

... am I still allowed on the slopes with skinny skis and are Look Nevada bindings still allowed. I'm probably going to be sking on the Bunny Hill with the little girls.


You are most certainly allowed to ski on this old stuff.  The only thing that would disallow them is that you're required to have ski brakes or something to prevent runaway skis.  Even skis this old had them, even if they were just tethers to your ankles, so you're probably OK here.

However, I would strongly recommend that you get your bindings checked before doing so, this is for your own safety.  And here's the rub: your bindings are so old that nobody is going to touch them. 

So your best bet is to rent something from this century.  Have fun out there. Stay safe.
post #18 of 24
hart competitions.jpg
Seen at a Rocky Mountain Masters race in December '09. The course was a SL on injected snow. He did pretty well until he go to the pitch.
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky View Post

Yeah, Look Nevada's, a great idea, maybe you will have matching knees.
Google Murren Switzerland and the Inferno down hill race. Its a 15 km down hill race for amateurs, used to everone that ran that race used Look Nevadas. I think you'll get a kick out of some of the videos Some great helmet cam shots. It's more groomed and not as long as it used to be but it's still one of the most beautiful runs in the world and the longest amateur race. It was the run James Bond made in Her Majesty's secret Service.  High adventure when I could still hit and bounce, but not a run for old men.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post





You are most certainly allowed to ski on this old stuff.  The only thing that would disallow them is that you're required to have ski brakes or something to prevent runaway skis.  Even skis this old had them, even if they were just tethers to your ankles, so you're probably OK here.

However, I would strongly recommend that you get your bindings checked before doing so, this is for your own safety.  And here's the rub: your bindings are so old that nobody is going to touch them. 

So your best bet is to rent something from this century.  Have fun out there. Stay safe.

 

I always adjusted the Look Nevada's myself most guys that used them did. There are a lot of adjustments, they take time and and you have to keep trying them out to get them just right. I love both the front and back rotating. They are easy to get in and out of and never felt any fatigue due to torsion when I used them. I never trusted the ski shops to adjust them. The shops are always in a hurry.  But that was long ago
Edited by pooch - 2/16/10 at 4:18pm
post #20 of 24
 I ski straight skis but they are fat. skinny straight skis(besides modern purpose built speed and mogul skis) do nothing better than what you have. You can ski them but quite frankly they suck!
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

...skinny straight skis(besides modern purpose built speed and mogul skis) do nothing better than what you have. You can ski them but quite frankly they suck!
 

I don know... 'suck' might be a bit too harsh...
I certainly have had a ton O fun on them on our local berg - Mtn High.
When you have a hill which is mostly groomed flat for boarders, having a real quick turning ski to ride all day gets a little to much 'worky'.
Nice to have a change up with something you can just roll on and have some vicious fun at GS speeds.
Now you could go out and buy the latest and greatest GS sticks, or you could make do with some vintage rippers. Iff'n you;re not running gates and can choose any line, then doin top to bottom non-stops is a nice diversion from turny modern stöckli (which, BTW, means 'little sticks').
And I've found there's a whole bunch of fun to be had in warp speeding around the 'movin gates', AKA boarders...
So, a quiver without some Paleolithic 205s is hardly complete!
So easy , even a caveman can do it! Prost !
post #22 of 24
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post

http://vimeo.com/4306591
 

  If you are a good skier you can ski any skis in any conditions and make them work period. The thing is some skis are better and more  enjoyable to ski then others.

Awesome video BTW  
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
here's a cute kid running the Inferno. You guys will probably get a kick out of this. Doesn't look like they are starting a Piz Gloria which is the best part of the run.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ves7S59Q5s

What is the Inferno Race?

The Inferno Race in the Swiss Alpine resort of Mürren was organized for the first time in 1928 by a group of "ski-crazy" Englishmen. Today it is the largest amateur skiing race in the world.
This spectacular annual event is so popular that participation has to be limited to "only" 1800 competitors - about half the skiers who would like to participate. The course covers 15.8 kilometres of contrasting terrain and topography, and is open to the skiing public at other times of the year.
The Inferno Race is particularly suited to allround skiers. As the official documentation explains: "The upper part of the course demands downhill turning technique and an optimal line. The middle section calls for an ideal downhill position and fast gliding. From the "Kanonenrohr" to the "Höhenlücke" technically superior skiers come into their own. Over the stretch from Maulerhubel to Winteregg, skating step and arm power can be all-important. And from Winteregg-Spriessenkehr to Lauterbrunnen optimal equipment, a clean downhill position and - not least - mental stamina can be the key to a fast final time."
Briefly, the course can be summarised as follows: The Start is located just below the 'Kleines Schilthorn'. From here, the course continues through the Engetal to the Schilthorn Hut. Then follows a long drawn-out "S" to just below the Muttlerenhorn, followed by the challenge of the Kanonenrohr. Next comes a further "Double S" and a sharp right curve. The course climbs into woodland, crossing the path of the Maulerhubel Skilift. A slight ascent then leads to Winteregg over the Winteregg Bridge, joining the forest trail in the direction of Lauterbrunnen.
This attractive course can be covered by competent skiers in about 45 minutes. The winner of the Inferno Race takes less than 15 minutes.

Edited by pooch - 2/16/10 at 7:21pm
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