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ski on one leg?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I can ski straight and flat on my left leg but I can not for the life of me keep my right foot flat on the snow and ski a straight line on a gentle slope. Even when I push my weight outside of my leg I still edge the ski and make a slow turn to the left. Is this more likely to be a technique issue or a boot issue?
I've asked help from both instructors and boot fitters and neither could see anything about my form or fit that should have caused the problem. Any thoughts or suggestions?
post #2 of 12
I have a similar problem. I am able to ski on on leg with some commitment after canting my boot and new custom food bed.
post #3 of 12
Do your shoe soles wear differently from each foot? Switch skis does that make a difference. Can you carve/skid each ski while 1 foot skiing in any direction? Narrow down the varibles to isolate the problem. Good luck.
post #4 of 12
Practise making left turns on yoru left ski only and right turns on your right ski only.   Once you can do that you should able to go straight.  It will still wobble though if you get any speed.
post #5 of 12
Modern skis don't like to run flat.  Their tips want to go into a turn one direction or the other, especially with any sort of speed.

If you can successfully run the ski flat on your left foot and not on your right, you probably favor your left foot and unconsciously make the little adjustments inside the foot necessary to keep your balance.
post #6 of 12
 Need to see video to say for sure, but I'd say its likely to be boot issue.
post #7 of 12
Repost this in the Ask The Boot Guys forum.  None of us are exactly symmetrical.  If both skis are the same, and both legs reasonably equally strong, then you have one leg that is bowlegged or knock kneed, or otherwise different from the first.  Most of us do to some degree.  The bootfitters will know how to adjust your boots to get straight.  I doubt if one in a thousand instructors are trained in alignment--talk, yes, but not trained--and most "bootfitters" are footbed salesmen.  You've proven the problem...you can't ski a straight line on that foot.

Better yet, get video of you on an easy slope skiing straight down on each foot, then 45° left and 45° right on each foot.  Post that on the Boot Guys forum and get some great answers.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

Repost this in the Ask The Boot Guys forum.  None of us are exactly symmetrical.  If both skis are the same, and both legs reasonably equally strong, then you have one leg that is bowlegged or knock kneed, or otherwise different from the first.  Most of us do to some degree.  The bootfitters will know how to adjust your boots to get straight.  I doubt if one in a thousand instructors are trained in alignment--talk, yes, but not trained--and most "bootfitters" are footbed salesmen.  You've proven the problem...you can't ski a straight line on that foot.

Better yet, get video of you on an easy slope skiing straight down on each foot, then 45° left and 45° right on each foot.  Post that on the Boot Guys forum and get some great answers.
 

 
post #9 of 12
I see a lot here about the advantages of learning to ski on one leg-  i tried this and totally failed when i tried to shift to the outer edge of the one legged ski- so is this just a repetition and strength building exercise/

len
post #10 of 12
I saw a guy today with one leg skiing his a$$ off.   It's balance.  

Alignment?  Just put on your boot, stand like your skiing on a flat surface.  Hang a plumb bob from your knee center.  It should fall to the center of the boot, or just inside.  If not then find the cure.   Good luck.  I'm glad I don't have to ski on one leg, but guys like that..........well what can I say?
post #11 of 12
Try with your upper cuff completely unbuckled (including power strap), and pressuring your little toe.  If you can do this, then you need to have your cant readjusted.  If you still have problems laying the skis flat, you have stance/balance issues.  Typically, what I tend to see is the shoulder leaning to one side, but the hip on the wrong side of the skis.... reverse angulation.

Safety note:
- Leave the other boot buckled in case you lose your balance
- Turns will wash out with the upper cuff unbuckled since you can't engage the tips of your skis or create large edge angles.

Tipping of the skis has to start at the feet/ankle first.  A lot of people tip the shoulders first when skiing on one foot, leading to banking or worse yet, reverse angulation.


-Sundown-
post #12 of 12
 Skiing on one ski shows us a lot of weaknesses in our stance, but Lenkearny from my expierence being able to ski on one leg and make outside edge turns (right on right left on left) is mostly commitment issues. You have to be willing to move your weight over that one leg. While I can't fully explain the technique, I can say practice makes perfect ;)
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