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Skiing is a sport for life, but how has getting older affected your skiing? - Page 3

post #61 of 75
I am 67 and really happy to be skiing again.  5 years ago I got a rare muscle disease that took 40 lbs of muscle in a week and left me a quadriplegic.  At the time there was not much hope I would ever walk again let alone ski.  I was too stubborn to listen and told my doctors I would ski again and I am.  Since I have lost 35-40% of my muscle cells (not the same as disuse atrophy) my strength and therefore stamina is more limited than 5 years ago but adequate to ski again and do many other active things.

Skiing on a groomed slope or a few inches of powder and I still ski the same as before which has really surprised me.  No more bumps (didn't really enjoy them as I got older anyway), trees, gates, or steeps.  I can still ski well but getting up after a fall is a process....an ugly and slow one so I avoid it.  Not to mention the risk of injury.  After many months in hospitals and years recovering I don't want to be foolish and I have parked my ego until I am reincarnated as a young skier.  While I am still the first on the lifts I am no longer the last but the point is that I am skiing and really enjoying it.  Well enough to help coach my 15 year old grandson in racing and free skiing.

At some point we all lose our athletic ability due to illness, injury, and/or age but my illness came suddenly and I was not ready to stop skiing.  My muscle and joint (had those as well from the disease) problems aggravated some old injuries but so far I am coping with those.  As I learned while disabled we have to forget the person we were and accept what we are now.  Only then will you enjoy what you can do today, not yesterday.

It was winter when I hopitalized and it was painful thinking about what had happened to me.  Today I really look forward to winter again and enjoy skiing anywhere there is snow.

Bill
post #62 of 75

 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

 

Inspiring story! Get after it and enjoy life to the fullest

post #63 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimeral View Post

I am 67 and really happy to be skiing again.  5 years ago I got a rare muscle disease that took 40 lbs of muscle in a week and left me a quadriplegic.  At the time there was not much hope I would ever walk again let alone ski.  I was too stubborn to listen and told my doctors I would ski again and I am.  Since I have lost 35-40% of my muscle cells (not the same as disuse atrophy) my strength and therefore stamina is more limited than 5 years ago but adequate to ski again and do many other active things.

Skiing on a groomed slope or a few inches of powder and I still ski the same as before which has really surprised me.  No more bumps (didn't really enjoy them as I got older anyway), trees, gates, or steeps.  I can still ski well but getting up after a fall is a process....an ugly and slow one so I avoid it.  Not to mention the risk of injury.  After many months in hospitals and years recovering I don't want to be foolish and I have parked my ego until I am reincarnated as a young skier.  While I am still the first on the lifts I am no longer the last but the point is that I am skiing and really enjoying it.  Well enough to help coach my 15 year old grandson in racing and free skiing.

At some point we all lose our athletic ability due to illness, injury, and/or age but my illness came suddenly and I was not ready to stop skiing.  My muscle and joint (had those as well from the disease) problems aggravated some old injuries but so far I am coping with those.  As I learned while disabled we have to forget the person we were and accept what we are now.  Only then will you enjoy what you can do today, not yesterday.

It was winter when I hopitalized and it was painful thinking about what had happened to me.  Today I really look forward to winter again and enjoy skiing anywhere there is snow.

Bill




Quote:
Originally Posted by stoweguy View Post

 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

 

Inspiring story! Get after it and enjoy life to the fullest


Looks like a great candidate for the "Edge of Never" contest over in the Community forum area.  Want a cool movie Bill?  Hope you don't mine me entering your post for you..  Mods please remove it if someone deems it out of bounds somehow.

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/92415/your-edge-of-never-contest#post_1199946
post #64 of 75
I thought that was an excellent post also, hope it gets you a movie to enjoy.
post #65 of 75
Thanks for posting it in the contest.  I wasn't even aware of it.  Just thought my story might put skiing and good health into perspective and give more joy to those who are getting older and maybe not skiing quite the same as earlier.  Ironically, skiing in my "new life" is pretty good but my golf game sucks.  Seems counter intuitive but the motions of the golf swing are more difficult for me than skiing even though I have played golf for over 60 years at a high level until now.

Thanks again.  I will ski tomorrow on one of our anthills but it will be fun just the same.  Skied in NH last winter and plan to ski west next season.

Bill
post #66 of 75
Graduation-02192010-300x225.jpg
post #67 of 75
mistake
post #68 of 75
I've seen skiers get older and rely on being smooth and efficient rather than quick and athletic.  For better or worse, I have not gone down that path, still feel I can have sloppy technique and make up for it with agility.  Let the skis jet out or hook, I'll catch up.

I suppose that won't go on forever.  I'm working on skiing on two skis, figuring if I really drive the downhill ski my legs will burn out faster.  Fortunately, the new skis like this technique.

I don't jump cornices anymore.  I used to be an obligation, now I just stay away from them. 

I don't feel much need to enter races.
post #69 of 75
I felt a significant change after 50; I'm now 56.  in 2004-2005 and earlier, ski technology was developing at an incredible pace.  Its only been since 1998 that we have really seen the impact of shaped skis in the race profiles, and more recently increases in width and alternative camber and sidecut for freeskiing and powder.   This initially extended my skiing endurance, but mea culpa, conditioning has not been good enough to make gains recently.   The honest truth is, that heights are looking higher, and steeps are looking steeper.  Confidence in being able to stick an edge or a turn at a critical moment is key to enabling a line.  The biggest obsticle is the sense that compression from sudden terrain changes at speed could overwhelm my ability to stand against the increased G's.  

Overall, I have a great deal of satisfaction out of skiing, but no longer have the sense I'm anything special on the hill or immune to injury from challenging terrain.  This has been tough to come to grips with, and I'm still hopeful that increased fitness will put me back on track.  That of course is harder to come by than it used to be. 
post #70 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

   The honest truth is, that heights are looking higher, and steeps are looking steeper. 
....no longer have the sense I'm anything special on the hill or immune to injury from challenging terrain. 

 

I used to finish every season by climbing Mt. Hood and skiing from the summit, down the Pearly Gates or east chute, skiing past the roped climbers like SG gates.

The last time I did that I felt much less confident.  Maybe it was that it was fairly full of people, all with their cameras out waiting for this fool to lose it, but I thought, OK, good you can still do this at 55.  Do you want to still be trying it at 60? 65?.  I think I'll skip that run this year.
post #71 of 75
Thread Starter 
Physical ability is transitory, and worse, once you begin to let aspects of skiing that you really enjoy fall away, you will not likely get back to that place with your skiing. Back when I was riding the road a lot, I thought I would always ride just that way. Not really. So I'm glad I rode as much and as hard as I could while the getting was good. Now I see that part of my physical life as a stage that has come and gone. ouch! And in cycling, no amount of training can get you back to that level.

Skiing has an advantage. Skill and experience can compensate for some loss of aerobic fitness, fast twitch muscle strength, and joint flexibility. I am fortunate to be hitting my favorite lines a lot, and just the familiarity with the look and feel of those areas mitigates the natural realization of fragility and mortality.

It's a daunting question: how long can I continue to improve my skiing with experience and technical work before age begins to halt progress? So far, I'm skiing better each year, and that's probably true for quite a few of you dudes, and that rocks.  

If we let some level of skiing drift away, we will not likely get it back. It will become part of our past. so the fight has to be waged every season. That is my point about aging. no do-overs.
 


(getting injured does become increasingly unacceptable. a fact that I think can be accommodated by skipping a few days with extremely flat light and or very poor snow conditions. CR, the bottom dropped out of a turn in super flat light and then slammed into the next bump, and I swear my ribs colided with the pelvic crown as angulation turned into impossible compression. ouch! sore lats for 6 weeks. that only happens when you're getting older, sucks)
 
Sooo, Newf, keep killing the Mt. Hood summit line. Circ, stay in shape. all good.
Edited by davluri - 3/2/10 at 8:37am
post #72 of 75
Feelings are mixed.   I am 58 years young and beat the Jackson Hole TRAM down the mountain for first time.  I think this has more to with my new skis Volkl AC30s.  The Hobacks on the other hand were scratchy this year  with thin cover and  lots of twigs sticking  through, which resulted in me falling 3 times.  Its not like I have never taken a fall in the Hobacks before but  never more than once in one run.  

Oh well,  the important thing is to get back up and keep pointing those sticks down hill. 
post #73 of 75
Thread Starter 
the ambivalence is around whether you're improving or losing ground? based on current runs.

some epic conditions would go a long way to clearing things up. no one skis well in the weeds.
post #74 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

Feelings are mixed.   I am 58 years young and beat the Jackson Hole TRAM down the mountain for first time.  I think this has more to with my new skis Volkl AC30s.  The Hobacks on the other hand were scratchy this year  with thin cover and  lots of twigs sticking  through, which resulted in me falling 3 times.  Its not like I have never taken a fall in the Hobacks before but  never more than once in one run.  

Oh well,  the important thing is to get back up and keep pointing those sticks down hill. 
As I get older, I become more of a Ludite.   I will need convincing before I believe there is a better ski than my old Kästle SGs for racing top to bottom at top speed.   Anybody got a pair of new Nordica's they can lend me next time I go out west?
post #75 of 75
Slightly different perspective:
Getting older has :
1. provided me with the means to access skiing, there was no shot of that when i was younger.
2. i seem to improve over time, so age clearly has made me an attentive aspirant to others who are experts
3. lost the ego factor, so its no longer an issue whether "i skied that double diamond" but where are the slopes where I can warm up, work on my technique, then graduate to steeper and more difficult terrain, i.e. no interest in saying "i skied that" but focused on feeling "i skied that well".
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