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Anton Gliders - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

Why are we seeing attchment points through the bases?  th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

 


yes you are...not too indifferent as when you wax a ski and you can see the screw points. Those look like there is fresh wax on them anyway. 

post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

After listening to Wayne in the video above regarding how they "work" I'm left feeling simply that this is really not "new technology".

He said they start with a flat (no camber) ski and preload the tip and tails with the composite spring. Well guess what, a convensional cambered ski does just that with an "internal spring" or the skis designed camber. It causes the tip and tail to be preloaded when the skiers weight is on the ski. The "direct torsion path" is also engineered into a conventional ski with metal layers or cross section in any decent conventional hard snow ski. 

 

So nothing new,

 

Conventionally cambered skis cannot have tip and tail preload be independent of underfoot flex.  

 

These can.   I call that a new thing.   

 

I also can't blame Wayne for not getting _that_ techy in a video.

post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 

Rossi, have you ever skied on them?

post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastskier44 View Post

Rossi, have you ever skied on them?



 Nope...and they're made near me too

 

to be honest, I'm really not interested based on what I see to even try them

post #35 of 44

I noticed that but I chalked it up as just pre-production issues.   Shouldnt need to do a base grind out of the box on $2k skis.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

Why are we seeing attchment points through the bases?  th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

 

post #36 of 44

Not sure those need a base grind. If the screws are real close to the base, they conduct heat away when you are waxing. I'd guess that brushed and scraped you wouldn't see that. That's what it looks like to me anyway.

post #37 of 44
Thread Starter 

Rossi, I know it's easy to be skeptical, as I was earlier in this thread, but I would strongly suggest that you try them before you diss them.  They are a pretty unique ski.

post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastskier44 View Post

Rossi, I know it's easy to be skeptical, as I was earlier in this thread, but I would strongly suggest that you try them before you diss them.  They are a pretty unique ski.



 The price alone would keep me off them even if they have something to offer. I'm not dissing them, I'm simply commenting on the info and pix that has been provived by the skis manufacturer and rep. Questioning their usefulness and value at this pricepoint. I also questioned Kastle's value at their pricepoint and that is a "traditional" ski. For my dollars I don't really see the uniqueness, just doing externally what a conventional cambered ski does "inside". ymmv

post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

Not sure those need a base grind. If the screws are real close to the base, they conduct heat away when you are waxing. I'd guess that brushed and scraped you wouldn't see that. That's what it looks like to me anyway.


They came out of the box in perfect tune from the factory, and I did not touch the tune during several days of skiing the UFOria XAs.  Excellent quality out of the box.. The photo I posted shows a freshly waxed, unscraped set of skis (cold snow blue wax)...hence the spots where the temperature differential at the binding insert points caused the difference in cooling coloration.  After scraping, brushing/waxing...the spots disappear.  As far as the price....definitely expensive because the hardware is expensive to make and there is a bunch of handwork to assemble the suspension parts.  The big deal for me trying the Anton suspension system is not so much the level of performance (which is really fun and definitely high-end performance), but the ability to adjust the flex of the ski from soft and short-radius to stiffer and long-radius with your gloves on.  The Antons are priced out out most skier's budgets, but then again, the MacBook Pro laptops are priced out of my league and pretty much do the same thing as most other laptops!

post #40 of 44

These skis are dangerous - to your wallet!

 

The first time I demoed K2 shaped skis, they were magic and I bought them. When I demoed the ultralight Goodes, they were magic and I bought them.

 

On groomers and hard snow, these skis are magic. But I hate groomers and hard snow so I avoid the conditions that the Antons excel in. I don't race often enough to justify new skis. If I skied Socal a lot with its steep hard groomers, my wallet might be at risk. But since I ski mostly at Squaw and mostly when the snow is soft, these skis aren't critical for my quiver. Plus they are too heavy for my tastes. So I'm following the development closely - waiting for reductions in weight and price.

 

There's nothing wrong with test driving a Cadillac even if you really are going to buy a Kia. Demo these if you can - just for the fun of it!

Eric

post #41 of 44
Quote:

Originally Posted by eleeski View Post

 

Plus they are too heavy for my tastes. So I'm following the development closely - waiting for reductions in weight and price.

 

 



Well sure, you need some carbon fiber boots to go with these to complete the high tech look and to offset the weight. biggrin.gif

 

DSCN1802.JPG

post #42 of 44

Actually my Full Tilt boots with the Intuition liners are fairly light. Not quite as light as Scott boots but as light as anything out there commercially. Coupled with the Goodes, I can throw my legs around and pretend I'm still young.

 

I'm actually prototyping some Kevlar waterski boots. Hmmm I wonder how much more work it would be to adapt them to snow skis...

 

Come to think of it, the Antons are way cheaper than the custom waterskis I build (carbon/boron composite is expensive).

 

Eric

post #43 of 44



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post





Well sure, you need some carbon fiber boots to go with these to complete the high tech look and to offset the weight. biggrin.gif

 

DSCN1802.JPG



This ski would be the perfect place for an integrated knee binding....popcorn.gif

post #44 of 44

I have skied on the adjustable version of these skis for about three months and use them almost every day at Deer Valley, UT. They are great skis on groomed slopes in general and grip tenaciously on steep, icy terrain. The springs that cause them to bite the hardpack so well will cause the tips to dive in powder deeper than 4" although I have used them in deeper powder by dialing back the tension setting to its lowest level. They currently only sell them in 162 CM length but I have found them to be as stable as the 170 CM Volkl AC-50 skis that I used before buying these and, unlike the AC-50s, they turn very easily. The local sales rep claims that they are working on an all mountain model with an adjustable rocker that may be released next season. 

 

The Antons are the only ski that I use on groomer days. I have had so much fun with them this season that I have forgotten the rather steep price that I paid. (Thank God for Mastercard.)

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