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Iron Question

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 
 I’ve heard or read somewhere that you shouldn’t use a household iron for waxing?  Is that true?  If yes, why….

tia,

sani

post #2 of 36

True.

There are several reasons.
1. A household iron does not maintain the consistent heat that a dedicated ski iron
2. Ski iron has a flat base with no steam holes (these will plug with wax

 
 

post #3 of 36
A household iron can burn your bases if you do not pay attention to heat setting. (blister)

Other than that the major difference is that you can buy a household iron new for $13 or one of the ski irons for $80

There is no problem with the holes plugging with wax - makes no difference.  Keep the heat just low enough to melt the wax so thatyou do not harm your bases.

Mike
post #4 of 36
I use an iron that came from a the garage.  Where it came from before it got there, I don't know.  I keep it down around the "silk" mark and it does a fine job.  I got it for $0, but you can probably pick one up for $10 or less at a thrift store.  If the holes plug with wax, you're using WAY too much wax.
post #5 of 36
Got a little tailors iron years ago, works great.  No steam holes, very small to keep i the tuning kit. 

2 points of warning:

NEVER use the family iron.
NEVER let others iron clothes with the ski iron.

Never had scars on my head till I made these mistakes.  Teen age sister did not see the humor.
post #6 of 36
Clothes vs Wax iron post.

How much did you pay for your skis, lift ticket, gas, vehicle, life style, etc?

post #7 of 36
 The clothes iron pictured above in it's new home . I filled the steam holes with JB Weld . Yes I waxed some skis with burred edges 


Edited by telerod15 - 2/5/10 at 2:14pm
post #8 of 36
Thread Starter 
 So yes, a conventional iron can be used but with some limitations and risk.  Thanks epic.

BTW I found a folding travel iron that does not have steam holes.  I'm gonna mark the temp settings on the dial by measuring the surface temp of the iron.

sani
post #9 of 36
Just glanced at a couple of catalogs-you can buy ski irons starting at about 35-40 bucks. When you figure what skis cost, why be that cheap? (and I'm a cheap guy!)

Another advantage a ski iron has is better more even temp control, so it will stay heated enough to melt cold weather wax without overheating.
post #10 of 36
 The Black & Decker pictured above is an upgrade from a folding travel iron which got the job done but was not as easy to use as my new second hand clothes iron . (All clothes irons are not equal.) 

Cleaning out a closet, I found this GE left by an old girl friend. it's yours for five dollars plus shipping. For ten I will also JB Weld the steam holes .



post #11 of 36
Hey, that GE is the exact iron I use for skis. Set the dial at the low end of the "steam" zone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

 The Black & Decker pictured above is an upgrade from a folding travel iron which got the job done but was not as easy to use as my new second hand clothes iron . (All clothes irons are not equal.) 

Cleaning out a closet, I found this GE left by an old girl friend. it's yours for five dollars plus shipping. For ten I will also JB Weld the steam holes. :)



post #12 of 36
 Highly recommended!
post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

 The clothes iron pictured above in it's new home . I filled the steam holes with JB Weld . Yes I waxed some skis with burred edges 
Why not just get an iron with no holes?

Yes, my iron has seen more burs, but it's older.

Note the setting for different "types" of wax.  Most of my wax is "RAY".   That "LIN" wax must be for like -60 C.
post #14 of 36
 Because they pretty much quit making them without holes about fifty years ago.

I would be afraid to use your iron. Commercial production of Rayon began in 1891, so your iron is less than 119 years old. :)
post #15 of 36
Thread Starter 
 Went to my LSS today to pick up some wax with the intention of getting a cheap assed household iron.  While I was there I noticed they had Dakine irons.  They just arrived on Friday and were priced at $50, as apposed to the $160 for a Toko.  So I splurged and got the right gear.

Wax tomorrow!

sani
Edited by sanigene - 2/8/10 at 8:01am
post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Commercial production of Rayon began in 1891, so your iron is less than 119 years old. :)

Yes.  It's one of those new-fangled electric ones.
post #17 of 36
Same deal here. I've got an old travel iron....no holes. I've been using the same one since the early 80's. Works fine. I keep it turned down to the minimum temp required to melt the wax. I can tell when I have it where I want it by how fast the wax drips off the iron. Put plenty of wax on the base and keep it moving. "Never leave the iron stationary" is the most important thing with any iron. I can't see how you could overheat the base with any iron unless you have it really crankin or you don't keep it moving. The Swix and Toko irons look cool but I'd rather spend my money on better wax or a lift ticket......or a better ptex iron.
post #18 of 36
Way back when I found folding travel irons with no holes at some store.  I splurged and bought two - one for a friend and one for my brother for Christmas.  Was the worst piece of junk I ever encountered.  The temperature was completely uneven and I doubt you could iron a shirt with the thing let alone clothes.

I have been using old steam irona (and even new ones bought for this purpose) for years.  Works far better than the other junk I had.  Never had a problem and if given a Toko wax iron (which I have also used) would probably not use it anyway as I like the steam irons better.  They have far more character...

The best thing about the ski irons though is their compact size if you are travelling to races, etc... I thnk taht is just about their only advantage ...
post #19 of 36
Although a domestic clothes iron (new or used) may be a less expensive option, but the damage it can cause due to wide temperature swings can end up costing you. A good wax iron only fluctuates about 4-8 degrees Celsius when waxing. A clothing or small travel iron can fluctuate up to 30 degrees Celsius. The wild swing can easily generate scorching temperatures that burn bases or damage your gear. Choose an iron with a minimum wattage of 800 and a thick (one-third to one-half inch) sole plate with no holes.

You can buy a good iron for under $40 and if your lucky on eBay I auction a new one every week and they have been going for ~$36 with free shipping.  Why screw around with an old iron on your expensive skis when you can get a proper one that cheap?
post #20 of 36
OP, the Dakine sounds like a great deal!

The GE Light and Easy pictured above is still available. Five plus shipping as is, ten plus shipping with steam holes plugged. Shipping will be less than ten dollars, probably closer to five.
post #21 of 36
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post


Yes.  It's one of those new-fangled electric ones.

I can just see that cord igniting now.  Be careful with that thing.
post #22 of 36
That works out to under $15 delivered, less than $20 with the JB Weld modification. 
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

That works out to less than  $15 delivered, less than $20 with the JB Weld modification. 
post #24 of 36
 Sorry, double post.
post #25 of 36
I have both a specialty ski iron (at home) and a cheap iron (in my ski home in a neighboring state).  The Holmenkol/TOKO/DoctorD/whatever irons really do work better and easier.  Once you know your wax it is easy to simply set the temperature on the iron and iron the stuff in.  I wouldn't worry too much about a cheap iron ruining skis, though.  Wax will smoke if the temperature used to heat it is too high.  That is the easy sign to unplug the iron or turn the dial to a lower temperature.  Regardless, I'll probably replace the cheap iron with a good one just because I can afford the $38 or whatever Doctor D or someone else on eBay is charging.  The convenience of using a good "tool" is worth the money spent.
post #26 of 36
Pure nonsense, Sani.

Borrow some womans best unused top of the line iron with holes until you can drive her around to a few summertime flea markets or yardsales (the old fashioned ones) and you will find your proper iron and have enough money left over for 4.8 Sam Adms at Stowe..

Okay maybe 6 if you sweet talk the angels there.
post #27 of 36
wups

brain police

everyone standup and salute

k

tks
post #28 of 36
Can anyone explain to me why telerod15 tends to appear driven to draw us into contemplating modes of raw anarchy?

Nevermind.

I'm sure it's just me. Again.

Gooday all youz users of the boards.
post #29 of 36
Go with Mike's answer, Sani, Tia, whatever.

______________

Sorry, M. Workin' on gettin m' own couple of questions answered eventually.

I get anxious around turnstyles I guess.
post #30 of 36
I confess I actually prefer my old hole-less clothes iron for everyday waxing because it heats up faster, is about 2x larger than the SWIX wax irons we have and also seems to adjust temp more quickly.  Just make sure you can ventilate your wax room.
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