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A guy in the posse did something really wierd, or not. - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Thread Starter 
Great observations and supportive feedback. I feel so much better and like not the only one who objects to this behavior. And, taking this support, I plan to feel so much more alone on the hill. Which to me is a good thing.

The greatest break in ettiquette is bringing the negative energy and monetary drive of your work to the hill with your buddies. IN-ex-cusable!

Some of these things get into your mind in the form of irritation and distraction (negativity) and are quite dangerous to your skiing. For a while I may stand at the top of my run and focus myself like you see a racer doing in the start area.

boot adjusters= someone always making you wait while they re-buckle? an-NOY-ying, go to a bootfitter and learn to ski a boot that is not a steel vice around your foot. There, Prickly, got you started. sorrrrrry.....Skifox, you are bad, girl, dig it.

We once did a thread on topics not suitable for the chair ride: divorse, money lost in the market, misbehaving offspring, medical problems, insurance coverage, broken trucks, and so on.
Edited by davluri - 2/4/10 at 11:13am
post #32 of 44
Thread Starter 
I'll tell you a crazy posse fact. So I tell this guy he rocks, that was a great line, thanks for showing us that, nice air, and other stoke comments. It's partly true, but important for bro bonding and improving someone's confidence.

So, next I know, the guy is developing attitude, telling me what to do and so on.

It's like telling a guy he is good looking and him taking this boost in confidence to hit on your girlfriend.

Group dynamics. Tough sometimes.
post #33 of 44
 I know I've told this story here once before but it bears repeating in this thread:

I volunteer to take a few kids from a local small school skiing a couple times a year.
The kids all have my cell phone number so that Ski Patrol can call me if such a need arises.
One day, while on the lift, my phone rings and I recognize the ski hill's number on my caller ID so I answer, thinking that, perhaps, one of my school kids needs me.

This is how the conversation went:
Pete: Hey Tricia, how soon can you get someone out here?
Me: Well Pete, which parent should I call?
Pete:  What are you talking about?  I need your sewer guy.
Me: Oh, I thought you were calling me about one of my kids in the school group I'm with
Pete:  Oh No!  I've got a sewer back up at the main lodge, and we think the sewer line is frozen between the ticket office and the main lodge.
Me:  I'll ski down and see what's up so I know which guy to dispatch.

Needless to say, if you were on the chair with me when I answered that call, you'd be very happy that I did. 
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Note: I run a sewer and septic servicing business which requires that I dispatch my servicemen in a timely manner.
 
It's a s%^&# job but somebodies got to do it. Don't you just love babysitting drivers.
post #35 of 44

The posse I ski w/ range over a number of different jobs and some are retired. We DON'T talk politics,wives/S.O. or work. Just ski.

post #36 of 44
Thread Starter 
Nice. Yeah, talking about skis and bindings and such is a kind of safe skiing conversation, focused on nothing really, on purpose.
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by moreoutdoor 

families were maintained, children were raised to became good humans and business were successfully (or unsuccessfully) run before cell phones.


 


True. But let me make my case by way of example.

When I used to ski with my wife before the days of the cell (and this was before we had kids), we'd set an appointment, 11 o'clock, say, at the tram dock. That 11 o'clock could become 11:15 or 11:30 or 11:45 depending on liftlines or snow conditions or equipment problems or who knows what. Someone waiting (eg, NOT SKIING), not knowing what was going on.
 

 

Now, you're running late, you call, move things back. Everyone less stressed, everyone skiing more. 

                                                              OR
 

What about the times when your buddy went AWOL all day, you're wondering where he is and you find out, later, at the bar that he scored a stash and was just head-down, farming it on his own all day?

 

Now, if buddy is so-inclined (granted, I wouldn't be), he gives you a little courtesy ring, invites you over to play, and voila', you are skiing powder, my Luddite friend.

 

It could happen.

 

post #38 of 44
Phone rings, it's your boss.. nuff said.   Sure you don't have to answer it, but they know if they leave a message you're probably going to know they are looking for you within an hour or two.   If you're at a resort that has some cell coverage and you frequent that resort your boss is likely to deduce whether or not there is cell coverage there (eventually) so you can't really lie about it.without getting caught.

But, I'll take the hook up with friend and family even if it comes with the risk of getting pulled back to work on your day off trade off.  I just think it is poor manners to blab on your phone in areas where folks come to Gape.  Talking on the phone on a chair with strangers is no different than doing it in a library or movie theater.  Folks are there for the ambiance and paying for is either through admission or tax dollars.  Blabbing on your phone in anything short of a real emergency is noise pollution. 


Let it ring on vibrate, wait, then check it off to the side of the lift at the top and do your business there or elsewhere.
post #39 of 44
You should leave the phone in the car, so it doesn't get damaged, or accidentally forget it there, or at least say that's what you did.
post #40 of 44
Thread Starter 

funny gil, we talk about noise polution, chroma pollution, and other offensive and obtrusive phenomenon that exist at ski areas. It is all about preserving the big mountain ambience and being in tune with the natural phenomenon instead.

this is a story when more communication is less. It was radios not phones. My son was about 8 or 9. We were separated for something and planned to use the radios to get back together. It was a very windy storm day. I radioed him and said meet me at the top of headwall. He didn't answer and I assumed he didn't get the call. I didn't go to headwall. He did get the message and he did go to headwall. He stood there freezing in the wind, looking at a scary roll over below him, covered with Vestrugi and ice  patches. He was cold, scared, and pissed. Then he gave up on me and skied onto the face. The vestrugi turned to excellent wind buff and  he had a great run. But what a communication f up.

post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post





True. But let me make my case by way of example.

When I used to ski with my wife before the days of the cell (and this was before we had kids), we'd set an appointment, 11 o'clock, say, at the tram dock. That 11 o'clock could become 11:15 or 11:30 or 11:45 depending on liftlines or snow conditions or equipment problems or who knows what. Someone waiting (eg, NOT SKIING), not knowing what was going on.
 

 

Now, you're running late, you call, move things back. Everyone less stressed, everyone skiing more. 

                                                              OR
 

What about the times when your buddy went AWOL all day, you're wondering where he is and you find out, later, at the bar that he scored a stash and was just head-down, farming it on his own all day?

 

Now, if buddy is so-inclined (granted, I wouldn't be), he gives you a little courtesy ring, invites you over to play, and voila', you are skiing powder, my Luddite friend.

 

It could happen.

 


Mmore than once thanks to the cell phones we've been able to set up a rendez-vous and ski together...
One text msgs I received last December was:
"Pow wow wow"
When I read it...I jumped to grab the skis in a hurry!

And the cell has worked very well in emergency cases (one calls the italian equivalent to the 911 which is 112 ore 113 or 118, identifies him/her self, provide the phone number where to be reached back, and then the disptacher sends the nearest Patrol for the "rescue") more than once...
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

You should leave the phone in the car, so it doesn't get damaged, or accidentally forget it there, or at least say that's what you did.

Then be sure not to get busted showing co workers photos from your cell phone camera weeks later LOL
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by guroo270 View Post

I wouldn't want to ski with anyone that was putting their business in my pleasure.

That's what she said...

I think skiing in pairs works the best, it seems like there's a lot less leapfrogging down the hill.
post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post

Now, you're running late, you call, move things back. Everyone less stressed, everyone skiing more.
                                                              OR

What about the times when your buddy went AWOL all day, you're wondering where he is and you find out, later, at the bar that he scored a stash and was just head-down, farming it on his own all day?

Now, if buddy is so-inclined (granted, I wouldn't be), he gives you a little courtesy ring, invites you over to play, and voila', you are skiing powder, my Luddite friend.

 

It could happen.

 


Can and does...
like I said, to each, their own.

for me, I still set times if there is to be a mtg. I try to get there, and sometimes I don;t make it.
it's always been a 15 min rule.
still works for me.
I carry the cell, and given an emergency, I'll give it a shot.
otherwise the bother of entering someone's cell number into mine is ...   a bother.
and since I make it a point to turn cell off before I start bucklin the boots, the cell is at best an emergency outreach.
Part of the ski day fun on a mtn, big enough to not 'run' into others, is exploring.
Exploring what I'm gonna find on the mtn, that day.
If I don't find the secret stash, so be it. It's all good.
...like the Big Dogs T-Shirt says - "We don;t need No Stinkin Leashes"

on the other hand, if I decide to spend time with someone, they KNOW they have my attention and participation.

yeah, kook
still... maxin out the Kook-O-Meter has its benes...
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