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Recommendation for kids intermediate ski

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi-
     Just got back from our second ski trip this winter. My oldest daughter has outgrown her old skis and needs some new skis. She is 7 yrs old, 50 lbs, 48", and a level 5/6. She grows about 1 inch per year. We're a short family. She can ski parallel, and hockey stop. Her teacher said that next year, she will be going down blacks (NC blacks keep in mind). She loves to go fast, and likes jumps. She hates girlie skis. Her teacher recommended 110 size skis, and said she should have a stiffer kids ski with a tight turn radius. We have an extra pair of Salomon 305 bindings at home, so we just need skis. Any recommendations? I was thinking Dynastar Team Speed, but are these too low quality? I don't want to spend over 150.00 for the skis. Also, our daughter is the oldest of three girls. The middle sister, 5 yrs, is on 88cm K2 Luv Bug Jrs (Jenna's old skis) , and loves them! So whatever Jenna (our oldest) gets, will eventually be passed on.
Thanks.
Anne
post #2 of 19
 your daughter may like a twin tip...... 
look into "line" skis best bang for the buck.
good luck
post #3 of 19
 I think the shortest Line twintip is a 119. Roxy/Rossignol has a nice one that goes down to 105cm.

http://www.rossignol.com/US/s1-pro_RA9WE02_product_ski-boys-skis.html

My daughter is taller than yours and is skiing the Roxy Abracadabra (same ski) in the 105.
post #4 of 19
Aaah, East vs. West differences.  When my kids were 48", they skied 118-130cm skis.

if you're looking for straight tailed skis, I'd try to find a pair of new old stock 118cm Rossi Bandit Jrs.  IIRC, they changed the line starting in 2008-09, though.  Same issue with K2 Apache Jrs -- 2005-06 was the last season they were the "advanced" kids skis; after that, they switched from wood to foam core and became a beginner ski.

For twins, Line's Celebrity Mini and Invader Mini are hard to beat.  My daughter's on her third pair.  Bomber build, great all mountain ski.  The K2 Juvy/Missy are also well built, as is the Fischer Riu Jr/Addict Jr (or its manufacturing doppelgangers from Salomon, I think they're the Kitten and Grom.)
post #5 of 19
Both of my girls ( ages 12 and 10) ski the Mini Celeb's and love them.

They are well built and ski much better than some of the cheaper brand.

I think EVO has the on sale in their outlet
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi Everyone-
  I appreciate the advice. The only thing is, since these are going to be hand me downs, I'm afraid to commit to a twin tip ski. What if the younger girls don't like freestyle? any opinions on the Volkl mini Pearls? They have a tight turn radius at 110 (6.7) and the brand is a good one. They would be @ 120.00 at evogear outlet. Let me know.
Thanks.
Anne
post #7 of 19
 Pearl is a twintip too. I've seen them not as stoked on the shape as on the Rossi/Roxy or the K2s. Still, I'm sure it would be a good ski for her, and I think that's the right size for her to be learning on.
post #8 of 19
 hi,
volkl is resting on their laurels....... i have broken 2 sets and am done with them. volkl doesn't respond to any type of complaint.
twin-tips are not for tricks alone, hell,  im 50 and ski line prophet 90's...........
i don't know any kids that would balk at twin tips.( being a dad and all)
good luck
post #9 of 19
As others have pointed out, lots of kids ski twins all the time these days.  Not to worry.
post #10 of 19
Last year my then 8-year old was skiing double diamonds--as in Utah double diamonds-- on the K2 INDY 112cm, which is exactly the same as the Apache Jr. (they simply change the tops from year-to-year).  Some retailers sell it as an intermediate ski, but he was arcing with them on the flats and skiing bumps, trees, steeps, powder, etc.  A little narrow for powder, but you live in the east.  You can still buy some of the older models for cheap.  I think K2 has been selling the same ski for around 4-5 years, just changing the tops.

Twin tips are the fad,and my oldest now has a pair for powder days, but your daughter won't learn to carve with them.  Your instructor knows what she is talking about.

The HEAD Supershape is also a great choice.  Check out www.level9sports.com.  They sell a bunch of jr. equipment that is new, but a few seasons old for really good prices.  $150?  Try $59, but they are a few seasons old.  Usually the same as the new models with different tops.  I found some INDYs on ebay for $70 on ebay a few months ago, and new twin tips in a 115cm  for $55!.  Your local ski shops (and yes, I support mine with a purchase or two every year) is probably having their mid-winter sale right now.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

Twin tips are the fad,and my oldest now has a pair for powder days, but your daughter won't learn to carve with them.  Your instructor knows what she is talking about.

Why not? They have sidecut just like any other ski, they work the same.
post #12 of 19
 who says cant carve on twins?  wrong wrong wrong..... thats just wrong.
 you can even carve switch........
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi-
  All brands aside, what do you think of foam core vs wood? I've seen some low priced, highly recommended skis (Dynstar Team Speed and K2 Indy's) and they have a foam core. I'm thinking wood is better for an intermediate skier. My daughter needs a ski that will improve her technique while letting her go fast. She zips by me on the hills, with a big smile on her face. She skied blues in Mont Tremblant with no problem. If we didn't live so far south, I'd put her on a race team.
  I did see a ski on skis.com that caught my interest, but is it too hard of a ski? It's a Rossi Radical RSX jr. race ski. I am also biased towards Dynastar...I have the Exclusive Carve, and they are AWESOME!
  Thanks for your input!
Anne
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

the K2 INDY 112cm, which is exactly the same as the Apache Jr. (they simply change the tops from year-to-year).

Essentially the same as the Apache Jr after they brought the name downmarket from advanced to beginner/intermediate.  The same ski, for all intents and purposes, was marketed as the Omni Jr. through 2006, then the Apache Jr., and now the Indy.  I've bought plenty of K2 junior skis for my kids -- we currently have 136 Mach SL and 136 Apache Jr (2005) in the mix, with 146 and 153 Apache Jr (2006) waiting to be mounted and 119 Juvys having been handed down to friends -- but never those.  And that's no accident.

The fact that your kid can ski double-blacks on them doesn't mean that they're well built skis.  It means your kid is a good skier.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eastcoastannie View Post

Hi-
  All brands aside, what do you think of foam core vs wood? I've seen some low priced, highly recommended skis (Dynstar Team Speed and K2 Indy's) and they have a foam core. I'm thinking wood is better for an intermediate skier.

Careful with the Dynastar kids "team" and "speed" skis -- IIRC, there are very similar topsheets and names for everything from their rental/beginner models through their true race models.  You just need to be sure.  Since the same company owns Dynastar, Rossignol, and Roxy, I'd also compare their lines to see which models are shared across brands (think GM).

The foam vs. wood core debate rages on.  They each have advantages in the abstract, and there are certainly high-quality foam cores.  As a rule, however, if a manufacturer sells junior skis with both foam and wood cores, the wood core skis are the advanced version.  Also, since you're planning to pass these down, ini my experience, wood core skis last longer.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisandy View Post

 who says cant carve on twins?  wrong wrong wrong..... thats just wrong.
 you can even carve switch........
You can "arc" on twins easily enough, but they are hard to "carve" on (changing the natural radius of the ski).  Twin tips chatter a lot when you do this.  It is simply a function of the tail.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post




Why not? They have sidecut just like any other ski, they work the same.

 
You can "arc" on twins easily enough, but they are hard to "carve"  (changing the natural radius of the ski having the tails follow the tips).  Twin tips tend to chatter a lot when you do this.  It is simply a function of the tail.  Using edges to steer under control isn't "carving."  I am not saying twin tips are bad for kids, nor am I saying kids have to learn to carve like racers.  I just believe that they can get to that "I can ski anywhere" level faster with flat tails.  Once they can do this, why not buy twin tips and let them use it in the park, pipe and powder?

Re: Foam v. Wood

There are plenty of great adult skis for experts in foam and wood cores.  Surely maple and ash will hold up better and longer than foam. Racers are (obviously) all skiing straight sidewalls and wood cores.  But foam is lighter and, therefore, easier for some lighter weight kids.  I ski a Stockli Laser SC as a hard snow carver with a foam core and a few layers of titinal.  OK, it is not as stiff as their wood core FIS skis, but it is still carves easily on the hard stuff because it is tortionally stiff with straight sidewalls, etc.  For a 7-year old?  Who cares if it is wood or foam, unless you are going to keep them for several years with lots of use.  Just get her something that she can't wait to ski with every day because they are easy to turn, stable enough for her weight, look cool and have good enough edges for the hard snow.

 
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post

Quote:


...  The same ski, for all intents and purposes, was marketed as the Omni Jr. through 2006, then the Apache Jr., and now the Indy.  I've bought plenty of K2 junior skis for my kids -- we currently have 136 Mach SL and 136 Apache Jr (2005) in the mix, with 146 and 153 Apache Jr (2006) waiting to be mounted and 119 Juvys having been handed down to friends -- but never those.  And that's no accident.
...


The Indy is a twin now, like the Juvy.  Also, has a tad of rocker now.  Might be the same construction as the older ones but the design has to be different. 

 

Are you saying that the Indy is an inferior skis compared to the other models?  If so, can you explain why?

 

My kid is ready for a bigger ski, I was thinking the Indy but there is also the Juvy which is wider, and cost almost $100 more.  I'm not trying to be a cheapskate.  I only want to get him the right ski for him to build skills.  But, he wants something that cool too.

 

-l2t

 

 

 

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post

Are you saying that the Indy is an inferior skis compared to the other models?  If so, can you explain why?

 

Compared to the Omni Jr and the foam core Apache Jr?  No -- it's the same ski, plus a little marketing rocker.

 

Compared to the wood core Apache Jr?  Unquestionably.  

 

The Indy is a beginner ski.  If your kid is looking to move up, he's not a beginner, and it's not the right ski for him.  

post #19 of 19

I wish I had seen this thread before starting this one..answers a lot of the questions I had.  Maybe it was because I searched for "girls" skis?

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