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Carbon fiber skis ?????? Big in waterskiing!

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I am a avid waterskier and a vacation only snow skier. I was wondering, why carbon fiber is not big in snow skis. In water skis it makes them lighter, faster, they don't twist and rebound from flex better. All the top end skis are carbon Fiber. Are lighter skis not better in Snow skis? I noticed I only see Goode Ski poles, but not their carbon skis. I'm 47 so i was thinking that light skis might help me to ski longer. What are your thoughts?
post #2 of 16
The sweetest, smoothest, velvettyest turns I have ever made on anything anywhere were on a Goode carbon fiber waterski. I've never even seen any of their snow skis in person. They don't seem to be catching on and the only complaint I have heard is - too light. Seems like a desireable quality for BC skis tho. Luvin' my Goode poles - won't have anything else now.

Welcome aboard fellow turns all year person!


                        Connelly F1  
post #3 of 16
 Skibumdan, welcome to the world of frozen water sports. And to this forum. You are now among the possessed.
Speaking of which, these are the skis I lust to possess. Perhaps there are others, but these VIST carbon skis are hand made in Italy in very small numbers. Not sure of the price - probably in the $3000 range. Curious as to how much carbon water skis go for. And it occurs to me that snow skis are getting so wide, we may get to the point that they work on water as well. 
Regards,
David

post #4 of 16
Doesn't our site's very own custom ski maker offer carbon fiber sheets as an option in his skis (as an alternative to metal sheets)?
I don't know much about commodity ski construction, but I wonder if some of them have carbon fiber inside without it being very obvious from the outside.
I think my boots have some kind of carbon fiber component...hell, I bought a racquetball racquet 20 years ago that was supposedly made from that stuff, it's not exactly exotic anymore.
post #5 of 16
Super-Light skis have their niche. The BC is one area they are definitely valued. For obvious reasons.  

But it's not the optimum configuration for powder, IMO. Ski weight does create stability in deep or deep and cut conditions. Likewise, probably not going to make it into the racing division; have you ever felt how heavy a pair of racing boards is? And no one is complaining or jonesing to change them. (??) correct?

Expensive skis are problematic, except for someone who will not view its value any different from a $700 ski. Skis get damaged, wear out, get boring, or slip out of the quiver place they once filled.
post #6 of 16
^ What davluri said.

The inertia that the mass of a ski has does make a difference in how much it deflects from snow irregularities.

If the one's idea of skiing was to skid (moving off-axis to the direction of the skis) slowly (inertia does less to stabilize the skis) with many changes in direction on a relatively consistent medium (few irregularities), then a lighter ski might make sense.  This is why many beginner's skis tout lightness as an attribute.  My mom's pair of Dynastar Exclusive 8's are feathers.  I think mogul skiers like lightness too, but that's of course due to the high number in changes of direction (3D changes as well).

On the other hand, a typical better skier is generally skiing much faster and closer to the direction of the skis on a more irregular medium (even a prepped racecourse is an irregular medium at the speeds racers are going).  A high moment of inertia (within the bounds of praticality) helps stabilize the skis.

I'm sure there's also something about mass-spring-damping (I'm pretty sure skis in some way behave as rod dampers, see archery), but that's too complicated for me to think about right now.

(I'm not skiing because I'm sick.)
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by deliberate1 View Post

 Curious as to how much carbon water skis go for. And it occurs to me that snow skis are getting so wide, we may get to the point that they work on water as well. 
 


$1000 - $1500 without bindings - er "boots". Funny how waterski trends compare to snowskis. Used to be you always got bindings with the ski, now not so much on the higher end sticks.
Goode's new Powershell waterski boot.... look familiar?


They release from the ski together on a shared plate.

Snow skis have been ridden on the water for a long time all ready. Shane McConkey rode waterskis fitted with alpine binders in deep powder before he developed the Volant Spatulas that started the whole wide, reverse camber/rocker, snowski trend.


Shane was THE MAN!

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Carbon fiber waterski run $900 to $1,300 blank.
post #9 of 16
It's a wierd convergence. I'm riding the chair, and some ski dealer hot water skier types are talking about carbon fiber water skis. I'm listening cause of this thread. The guy that skis says that the carbon fiber is awesome on glass, but skips on anything else. I said that sounds like it would be for a snow ski. how bout that for a coincidence.
post #10 of 16
Goode 9934 & 9936 model skis - $1490.00
Pick your flex, pick your boat speed and right or left foot forward...

http://www.goode.com/wsmodel2010.htm
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

It's a wierd convergence. I'm riding the chair, and some ski dealer hot water skier types are talking about carbon fiber water skis. I'm listening cause of this thread. The guy that skis says that the carbon fiber is awesome on glass, but skips on anything else. I said that sounds like it would be for a snow ski. how bout that for a coincidence.

I guess the benefits of mass and enertia are universal to skiing. Personally I've always liked a heavyer, damp, relax and ride sort of ski - snow or water.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4cznskier View Post




I guess the benefits of mass and enertia are universal to skiing. Personally I've always liked a heavyer, damp, relax and ride sort of ski - snow or water.
 


Yeah,me too!  The DPS's ski the lower angle untracked amazingly well, but if I'm charging the steeps, I'm on something like the XXL's.

If the waters flat, I usually foot, so I'm still on a Concept.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post





Yeah,me too!  The DPS's ski the lower angle untracked amazingly well, but if I'm charging the steeps, I'm on something like the XXL's.

If the waters flat, I usually foot, so I'm still on a Concept.

 

The most interesting shit here is that different guys think differently of how they ski and what they need.  The shredhead's lower angle untracked would be fucking scary steep for most guys on this board, his steeps, well, I am sure they wouldn't even think of them as skiable at all.
That is, I love the features of carbon construction in any conditions and in any terrain - stiff and light. And when it comes to dampening I don't need it that much, probably because I don't ski 40 degree cut up slopes at 60 mph.
Different strokes for different folks. 
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post







If the waters flat, I usually foot, so I'm still on a Concept.

 

Barefootin' is radical! I think that is about the only kind of skiing I haven't done - maybe carbon fiber booties and wetsuit for that!

All this talk about waterskiing is given' me a mid-winter liquid jones....

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by apeyros View Post




I love the features of carbon construction in any conditions and in any terrain - stiff and light. And when it comes to dampening I don't need it that much, probably because I don't ski 40 degree cut up slopes at 60 mph.
Different strokes for different folks. 
 

I think what the OP was referring to was skiis that are PURE carbon fiber which is the case with the Goode skis and I suspect the Vist skiis that d1 mentioned - different animal from carbon/kevlar/fiberglass COMPOSITES which I think are a best of all worlds thing.
post #16 of 16
Like I said...   

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