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Din part 2 - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Thread Starter 
The shop has 2 locations, both are in a ski town (both ski areas like 3 chairlifts, season pass is like $400, about size of brian head utah).   For the record the shop does have a testing device, just not at the location I went to.  They told me they would send the skis to their other shop and I would get the skis back in a couple of days, and I was the one who said no need to. 

I found out the owner of the shops did the DIN, and he just transposed the numbers.  The shop employee said that he (the owner) felt bad about it.

I am happy that I only strained my knee, given that where it was hurting was where I had a serious fracture and couldnt walk on it for like 6 months.  Only minor harm (a strain is almost zero) so no (little at most) foul. 

Now, to change the subject, any boot experts know what dalbello boot the mx super is equivalent to in the consumer lineup?  I bought the dalbello mx super because not only was I able to try it on, but I was able to rent it and find out it worked fairly well. I can get boot fitted someplace, but noplace near me will rent that boot for me to try out.

Anyone know what flex the mx super is?  I assume fairly low, like 70.  Is there a boot in the dalbello consumer line up that has the same fit as the mx super but is stiffer?


Quote:
Originally Posted by supergaper View Post

If the shop does not have a binding testing device, it cannot adjust, mount or touch bindings.  This is so wrong on so many levels.

And this shop is in a ski town?

Every time I have adjusted or mounted a binding, I have to explain that the DIN is set based on age, height, weight, skier type, and boot sole length, AND that the settings are visible in windows in the toes and heels-  the customer then signs the shop form, stating that he understands this.

Then I give the spiel about how skiing is a dangerous sport with inherent risks, and neither myself the shop nor the binding manufacturer can guarantee that the binding will prevent injury in the case of every fall and that you will be skiing at your own risk.  The customer then signs this (the back side of our work ticket with similar legal boilerplate).

I thought that is how all shops do it.  I have taken 5 different binding certs all eleven years I have worked at my shop.

The shop and it's employees cannot "use their discretion" when setting bindings.  Have I ever handed a posi drive to customer and turned my back?  Yes.  I have also made plenty of customers sign waivers so I could turn their bindings up.

Do I ski on my recommended DIN setting (8)? No.  But that is my decision, when acting in my professional capacity, there can be no deviation from the manufacturers' recommended settings.
 
post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by E.J. LEVY View Post

140 pounder and a DIN of 11?  Why?  Do you always come out at a 7 or 8 DIN?  It always seems that the smaller guys need to crank it up! Have not figured that out yet except for the Napolean mindset. 

So no one read my previous note. Have I missed all the comments about how his heel came up?  How about making sure the boot fits well. Snug it up with a good foot bed and perhaps a heel lift.

EJL

I am 5'8", 155 lbs, 44 years old, 295 BSL,  and ski on 13.  125 days a year.  You live in Michigan and ski 40 days a year.  If we extrapolate vertical skied- well YOU do the math.

If someone, of their own volition, wants to ski a higher setting, then so be it.

The point is that the OP got hosed by a supposed professional trusted to do his/her job right.  bootfit has nothing to do with his DIN setting.  No chance in the world a type 2 is set at 10.  
post #33 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by E.J. LEVY View Post


So no one read my previous note. Have I missed all the comments about how his heel came up?  How about making sure the boot fits well. Snug it up with a good foot bed and perhaps a heel lift.

EJL

That is possible.  I have a friend help me, he really tightens it up.  It is real tight, like a male reproductive organ in a virgin's der poopenhausen.  Like a firm handshake.  Like a pair of levis a couple of sizes too small that take you half an hour to wiggle into.  The only reason my heel came up, was because it was either
1) come out of binding
2) break leg
3) heal starts moving up because 1) doesnt occur.  If 1) hadnt occured when it did I would of either had my foot come further up, or would of broke my leg (at tibia plateu)
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by E.J. LEVY View Post

140 pounder and a DIN of 11?  Why?  Do you always come out at a 7 or 8 DIN?  It always seems that the smaller guys need to crank it up! Have not figured that out yet except for the Napolean mindset. 

So no one read my previous note. Have I missed all the comments about how his heel came up?  How about making sure the boot fits well. Snug it up with a good foot bed and perhaps a heel lift.

EJL
 

I come out at 8 in the sollys and come out at 9 in the Markers too often. I don't want to come out. With a small BSL you can get a lot of torque.

I do release with my current settings but only in a big event.
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveys View Post

That is possible.  I have a friend help me, he really tightens it up.  It is real tight, like a male reproductive organ in a virgin's der poopenhausen.  Like a firm handshake.  Like a pair of levis a couple of sizes too small that take you half an hour to wiggle into.  The only reason my heel came up, was because it was either
1) come out of binding
2) break leg
3) heal starts moving up because 1) doesnt occur.  If 1) hadnt occured when it did I would of either had my foot come further up, or would of broke my leg (at tibia plateu)

A more likely reason your heel came up excessively is that, even though you feel you have an extremely firm fit, the 'fit' may not right.
'Heel Hold down' is accomplished by a number of things. Primarily if there's too much room or compressible material over the instep, your heel will come up beyond the holddown the heel pocket can provide. If the hellpocket is not well defined by the boot structure (as many boots still have poor heel pockets in the shell and rely on the liner to do the work.
Too long of a boot (with space over the instep) can exascerbate that whole scenario, by allowing the foot to first slide forward a slight amount and THEN start lifting out of the heel pocket.
So your boot may still not 'fit' properly.
Based on your 'description' of your mishap, here's my interpretation.

going into your forward fall/movement, your foot starts pulling up the inside of the boot, due to excessive clearance or soft material at the instep (or not enough shell closure at the instep area). binding doesn't get loaded with the full force of your forward movement, much is dissipated by the movement in the boot. Thereby puts your body structure/leg in a compromised position.
Foot finally stops moving within the boot as the instep is eventually trapped by the boot shell. Now, your bindings are finally loaded with the full force of your body's movement/weight. The binding finally releases... you did state that you eventually released, right ?
In the meantime you've tweaked 'parts'. Be happy you didn't break any bones in the foot, those are tough and longterm healers.

This in no way infers anything about the bindings release settings - that's another issue.
And given a lower setting you may have never reached this scenario above, and never found out how critical boot fit is to proper binding function.

BTW, your metaphors are poopenhausen
post #36 of 47
it seems you've been skiing for several years now, bought your own skis and such, by now you should start setting your own DIN so there's no error or doubt.

of course get it tested by professionals when necessary.

Also by now you should know what DIN you require, are comfortable with, and prefer.

Not everyone goes strictly by the chart.

You know best how you ski, you also know what kind of skiing you do, and what kind of falls you are most likely to take. 

I think by now you can figure out what level DIN you'll need out of your bindings when you go skiing and also how much higher or lower you want them for your balance of convenience/safety.
post #37 of 47
Thread Starter 
About 30 years.  I have set my own DIN before, this time I figured I would help out the local shop and have the din as well as wax done by them.  Funny that when I did things myself I had no problems, but when I paid to have professionals do it I strained my knee, and almost had it broken :(
Quote:
Originally Posted by juhocha View Post

it seems you've been skiing for several years now, bought your own skis and such, by now you should start setting your own DIN so there's no error or doubt.

of course get it tested by professionals when necessary.

Also by now you should know what DIN you require, are comfortable with, and prefer.

Not everyone goes strictly by the chart.

You know best how you ski, you also know what kind of skiing you do, and what kind of falls you are most likely to take. 

I think by now you can figure out what level DIN you'll need out of your bindings when you go skiing and also how much higher or lower you want them for your balance of convenience/safety.
post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveys View Post

It has been a week and my tibea plateu is still "strained".  If it was broken instead of sprained I probably would be in talks with them.    

How do you know. I broke mine last year. It didn't hurt very much and X-rays didn't show anything. MRI did. I kept skiing on it while waiting for the MRI. If it's broken, don't ski on it!
post #39 of 47
43 years old, 5'8" 175 LBS Dins all 7.5.. Ive been setting my own bindings since the 70's.. My favorite test is to chop the tip of your ski into the snow like a twisting fall.. you should pop out without too much trouble but you shouldnt be falling out of your skis in the bumps etc..Knee injuries suck
post #40 of 47
The problem with field tests is that if the bindings are set too high, you risk injury performing them. I used to twist out of my bindings to 'dismount' until one time I tweaked my knee.
post #41 of 47
 Absolutely.. as always test at your own risk.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

The problem with field tests is that if the bindings are set too high, you risk injury performing them. I used to twist out of my bindings to 'dismount' until one time I tweaked my knee.
post #42 of 47
Wow, yea 8 is way too high, definantly with a busted up knee. Im 5,10 210 and my dins at 7, which is the expert setting from the shop/chart, never had a premature release and never had any problems with them not releasing, never tore my knee up anymore than it already is. Tore my acl in HS football so im real carefull with it. Dont wanna screw my knee up again and if i was you id look up the chart online. As far as the price for the ski work that sounds about right
post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowyphil65 View Post

Wow, yea 8 is way too high, definantly with a busted up knee. Im 5,10 210 and my dins at 7, which is the expert setting from the shop/chart, never had a premature release and never had any problems with them not releasing, never tore my knee up anymore than it already is. Tore my acl in HS football so im real carefull with it. Dont wanna screw my knee up again and if i was you id look up the chart online. As far as the price for the ski work that sounds about right

Traditional bindings won't protect your knee, so it's a moot point.  In fact there are some ACL-busting backward twisting fall scenarios where the binding probably wouldn't release even at the lowest setting.
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

Quote:


Traditional bindings won't protect your knee, so it's a moot point.  In fact there are some ACL-busting backward twisting fall scenarios where the binding probably wouldn't release even at the lowest setting.
 They wont completely protect your knees but there not bear-traps.
post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by polariso View Post



 They wont completely protect your knees but there not bear-traps.
 

Good point (looking at a pair of bear trap bindings hanging on the wall right now).
post #46 of 47
 I have an old pair of wood Northlands with bear traps leaning in the corner of my living room.. My knees hurt just looking at them ..lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post




Good point (looking at a pair of bear trap bindings hanging on the wall right now).
 
post #47 of 47
A friend of mine demonstrated the safety feature inherent in those bindings.  They required purely wooden skis with no metal in them except of course for edges; he skied into a rock face and the ski broke, thus saving his knees. 
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