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Skiing crud Do you enjoy it?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
We went out last night , and being in the Carolinas the weather is a bit warmer then some places in the country and exposes us to spring like skiing throughout the season.
As we came down the hill last night at our usual moderate ( our moderate speed and others may differ) speed in about 6-8 inches of soft porridge I remembered how nice it is to be able to get your feet way out to the side and just glide through it and feel the constant resistance against your ski.
I love spring type snow somtimes  ( can I say it??? ) as much as powder!!
(of course this all took place on the bunny hill)
post #2 of 32
I love skiing anything.  I don't like ruining my skis on gravel. Here in Sudsbury we haven't had enough snow.
post #3 of 32
Roller skating in hot mud, how can you not love it?
post #4 of 32
 At Mt. Baker we get lots of new snow on a regular basis (this year excepted) and everyone is a powder hound.  The whole ski area is shreded by 20-30 minutes after opening and then the crud skiing begins.  I love it.
post #5 of 32
You got to love the one you are with.  Even in Utah if you are waiting for perfection, you will miss most of the season.

Hell yes, I enjoy skiing crud!
post #6 of 32
Crud = cut up powder, so yes, I like it a lot.  With the right ski and skills, it can be as good as skiing powder in my experience.

Spring snow is also loads of fun with the right skis, but it usually signals the end of the season for me (or a mid-season thaw) so it's not always a joy.  But fun, yes.  Bumps with spring snow are fun as heck.
post #7 of 32
 Id rather ski any sort of soft snow than hardpack any day of the week.
post #8 of 32
 Just like powder and/or any poor snow condition, crud will expose one's poor technique pretty quickly.

I like it anyway.
post #9 of 32
I like most stuff other than frozen ruts.
post #10 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13 View Post

 Just like powder and/or any poor snow condition, crud will expose one's poor technique pretty quickly.

I like it anyway.

eh ice wil expose poor technique faster than anything, I like crud cause its a breeze to ski.
post #11 of 32
I didn't enjoy crud until today. It wasn't too fun on 172 Prophet 100's, But the 182 Sir Francis Bacons put a huge smile on my face every where I skied today.
post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




eh ice wil expose poor technique faster than anything, I like crud cause its a breeze to ski.

I guess here in the good old Mid-Atlantic we just get more practice skiing ice than crud.
post #13 of 32
 Old Boot, the porridge you enjoyed is not crud. I love the wet granular we get here in the south. I would much rather ski powder/crud, but spring conditions are great fun.

skier219, slush bumps don't always mean the end of the season. Mid-winter thaws and end season skiing are joyous events to be celebrated not bemoaned!
post #14 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




eh ice wil expose poor technique faster than anything, I like crud cause its a breeze to ski.


I don't know. One thing about ice, it's consistent. How hard is that?
clarification: smooth ice, not frozen ski tracks and frozen clods.
Edited by davluri - 1/23/10 at 6:07pm
post #15 of 32
 As hard as it gets. Rock hard. Inpenetrable. I think it's icier up in New England than mid-A though.
post #16 of 32
 Crud, guys.  This thread is about crud.
post #17 of 32
Crud is one of those words that means different things to different folks. If you mean soft cut up powder, relatively soft slab or spring granular, I like it lots. If you mean refrozen death cookies, thick breaking slab, frozen crust or avi debris... not so much.
post #18 of 32
Warm frozen (semi frozen that is) granular=hero snow
Mashed taters=skied out powder
Crud=skied out powder that got wet then re-froze as chunks

I prefer crud to mud.  But, I prefer hero snow to crud.  The best day would be powder in the morning and hero snow with slush bumps in the afternoon
post #19 of 32
The ski technology has changed crud skiing at least as much as front side skiing. 

Skied Crystal Mt. yesterday on some 10 Gotamas, and the snow was all over the charts except pow (we had about 18" in the last week and some 100+ mph winds).  Today's skis will let you play with turn shapes and type, older straight skis not so much.  In my youth the quality way to ski loose snow was rhythmic short turns, like skiing 8's today, now it is however you like it.

Depending on exposure on the high ridges you skied some pretty icy stuff, by WA standards, to get into chutes and bowls.  The Goats with their rockered tip said 'okay fine'.  The old stuff would have let you do one or the other in relative comfort but not both.  It was really fun kinda sorta good snow with modern equipment.

The down side of this ramble, like fresh stuff the chop doesn't last like it did either. 
post #20 of 32
We've had the "hero snow" style of what you might call crud here lately - at first I hated it but the more I skied it the more I loved it. Very spring like. So slow and soft - really had the opportunity to try new stuff without worrying about picking of too much speed.

Also you can really carve that stuff. I was getting angles I never get on the hard pack. Next week it's back to winter but I enjoyed this little mini spring. As long as it doesn't keep that up. =P
post #21 of 32
i think its the opposite.. take someone skiing powder with rockered skis and put him on the frontside with normal cambers and that will be where the poor technique of carving is exposed
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13 View Post

 Just like powder and/or any poor snow condition, crud will expose one's poor technique pretty quickly.

I like it anyway.
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by juhocha View Post


i think its the opposite.. take someone skiing powder with rockered skis and put him on the frontside with normal cambers and that will be where the poor technique of carving is exposed

 

and the person skiing rockers could probably care less. I would rather ski powder or soft snow poorly than ski ice well any day....


Although I can do both pretty well, just saying the person using the new tech to enjoy soft snow doesnt care what you think of their groomer skiing ability.
post #23 of 32
Different strokes for different folks.  I would rather win the Kitzbuhel DH than a powder 8 competition. 
Nevertheless, when it comes to skiing, I enjoy skiing anything.  Each has it's own sensations and rewards, provided you're doing it right.
post #24 of 32
As said, the new skis have changed the game. breakable crust was considered virtually unskiable 25 years ago. now it's kinda' fun and I love the tearing sound it makes. Same with crud, 9let's assume crud is a little damp, slightly set, heavy, chunky, un-even, at least 8 inches deep, maybe mixed with avi debris). Powerful, driving, 95ish skis handle this stuff adequately, and again, it used to be terminal.

basically, now days, with so many powder skiers, heavy powder will be crud in an hour or so, so skiing it is prerequisite to enjoying powder, as the two conditions are adjacent in time and in space.

Skiing crud well and enjoying it is an impressive skill and experienced off piste skiers recognize it as such.
post #25 of 32
Not until I  bought my Mythic Riders a few years ago.
post #26 of 32
Assuming you're definition of crud is chopped snow and ungroomed,......
 The more skill I develop, the more I seek "varied terrain".

Fun times, eh!
post #27 of 32
Skiing mashed potato crud - no problem if you carve your turns - if you skid your turns you pay. I would rather ski 6 to 8 inches of creamy powder but I am not gonna wait for it. I only get a chance to ski 24+"  bottomless every couple of years and I am not gonna wait for that day either. I just like to ski. But I don't like skiing rockhard frozen piles I just wait till the sun hits'em and makes them into mashed taters, then I ski. O'yeh then there is cordrury; carve, skid, wedge everything works.
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

As said, the new skis have changed the game. breakable crust was considered virtually unskiable 25 years ago. now it's kinda' fun and I love the tearing sound it makes. Same with crud, 9let's assume crud is a little damp, slightly set, heavy, chunky, un-even, at least 8 inches deep, maybe mixed with avi debris). Powerful, driving, 95ish skis handle this stuff adequately, and again, it used to be terminal.

basically, now days, with so many powder skiers, heavy powder will be crud in an hour or so, so skiing it is prerequisite to enjoying powder, as the two conditions are adjacent in time and in space.

Skiing crud well and enjoying it is an impressive skill and experienced off piste skiers recognize it as such.
25 years ago my SGs cut through that crud stuff like a walk in the park.  Making short turns has changed, quite a bit, blasting Long radius turns through whatever was in the way, not so much.
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve2ski View Post

Skiing mashed potato crud - no problem if you carve your turns - if you skid your turns you pay.


That's funny - I haven't carved a turn for years and I still manage to get by.
post #30 of 32
Seek out weird conditions and go enjoy them! ~ Charlie MacArthur
 
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