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Should I drill holes at the ends of my SportTube, to drain H2O?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I got a SportTube several years ago.  I towel my skis off after every use, stick them in the tube, come home, and until recently would then just leave them in the tube until my next ski trip.  Well, I started to notice some rust on the edges near the tips and tails :(

I just got new skis, and don't want that to happen to them.  I've gotten in the habit of taking them out of the tube once I get home...but even just using the tube for transit they're still in there for a long time.  For instance, it took me 13 hours of transit to come home from Telluride a few weeks ago.

So, knowing that I can't possibly towel ALL the moisture off of my skis, I'm thinking about drilling a couple tiny holes in each end of the tube, in hopes that that would allow any water to drain out, instead of pooling at the ends of the tube and rusting my edges.  Does this sound like a good idea, or would you recommend against it for some reason (structural integrity of the tube, or that it would defeat the purpose by allowing humidity in, or...)?

Thanks for your input.
post #2 of 15
Welcome to EpicSki.

OK, firstly, I wouldn't leave skis in the sportstube for any longer than is necessary, and would never store them in it for any length of time.
Secondly, if you're getting water pooling in the tube then it sounds like there's either a lot of snow left on your bindings when you come off the slope, or if you're travelling by car, you're putting the sportstube on the roof with the narrower end facing forward (so any rain/snow on the journey is running in to the tube.

Drilling holes in the tube will have little to no effect as there won't be much pressure to force the water out, so I'd have to say no, don't bother.

If you really want to protect your edges from rust, rub some vaseline on them before putting them in the tube.
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post

^ What he said.
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your replies.  I never would have thought of Vaseline in a million years, but it sounds like a great idea - I'll give it a shot.

I don't put the tube on the roof ever.  And I do wipe the skis down as best I can, but there is always a little bit of snow "way up in there" that I can't get, even if I open and close the bindings a few times to attempt to jar it loose.  There is some foam at the bottom of the tube and I think the issue is that that little bit of snow is melting and then soaking the foam.  So in addition to the Vaseline maybe I'll try harder to remove the foam.

I suppose another thing to do could be to bring the skis and tube inside the lodge and let them warm up for a while in order for that pesky bit of snow to melt, rather than trying to wipe them down and tube them while still outside in the cold.

Again, thanks for you answers.
post #5 of 15
 
I have a SporTube and see the same problem.  Or rather saw the same problem, since I've stopped using it in favor of traditional ski bags ( I bought a pair with lifter plates and they didn't fit inside the tube)  The problem is that the container doesn't breathe so moisture doesn't evaporate.  Small holes won't help with this.

The solution is to apply some rust inhibiting material to the edges - WTFH suggests vaseline, I use Toko or Swix paint-on ski wax.  Coat the edges with the wax and they won't rust.
post #6 of 15
I can't help you with the SporTube hole-drilling question, although I completely agree with Fox that it's a bad idea to store your skis in it, either way.

However, from personal experience, I would not recommend rubbing Vaseline on the edges. I used to do that, religiously, every spring before hanging up my skis for the off season. But Vaseline can seep in around the edges over time and discolor the bases, possibly (I do not know this for a fact) also weakening the adhesives that hold the ski together. It was a worse problem with the older "cracked edge" constructions and "your mileage may vary," but I'd still be wary of doing it.

Instead, give them a protective hot waxing or apply a good coat of rub-on or paste wax to the edges, which should protect them at least as well as Vaseline. Yes, that liquified hot wax or paste wax would seem likely to create the same problem, but I haven't seen it. Perhaps it has something to do with longer periods of time in storage.

Just a thought.... But--don't store them in the tube!

Best regards,
Bob
post #7 of 15
With any rack you get turbulent air and ... if .... if .... those holes you drill are on the "wrong side" of one of those little whirl-winds ... like in an area of positive pressure, you could have water entering the holes on rainy days.

George Romney (HUD secy, father of Mitt), then chairman of Rambler (American Motors) actually sent my wife's grandfather a letter about the leaking trunk, telling him to drill holes to let the water out.

Wonder why they went outta' bidness .... ?? 
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by chase View Post

I don't put the tube on the roof ever.

So where do you put it?  I had originally assumed you used it for flying / checking baggage, which is how I used mine. If your skis are riding on the inside of your vehicle, why do you bother putting them in the tube to begin with? Why not just let them travel loose like everyone else?

Something I'm not getting here....
post #9 of 15
My guess is it's as likely to be condensate as it is snow. I would not drill a hole. I think it would make it worse. Don't worry about the 13 hour ride. Concentrate on the time after they are stored. Take off one end off the tube when you get home and store in a warm dry place. It should dry out overnight.
post #10 of 15
I've always just run an old piece of ski wax or even an old chunk of candle down the edges to prevent rust, never heard of vaseline for this.
post #11 of 15
For in car travel, I always used a soft bag and made sure that was well lashed down (in the case of a wagon), the damage skis or any gear can do in an accident is pretty gawd-awful.

I figured he was using a sport tube lashed to a rack or a home made PV one?
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

My guess is it's as likely to be condensate as it is snow.

It's both.  It starts out as snow. The snow evaporates and then condenses on the cold steel rails. Instant rust - it only takes a couple of hours.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by chase View Post

I don't put the tube on the roof ever. 

Why not?   
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by lungdoc View Post

I've always just run an old piece of ski wax or even an old chunk of candle down the edges to prevent rust, never heard of vaseline for this.
+1 on the old candle to fill any gaps that the slathering of hot wax might not be covering.  I put a couple of strategically placed holes at the bottom of my Thule box which allows the small amounts of water from the snow melt or incidental leakage to escape. I don't scrape until I arrive ready to ski,  And, I dry the skis and rub wax on the edges immediately when I arrive home because I might not get around to waxing them again for a day or two..
Vasaline prevents wax from sticking to your edges.  Petrolium based lubricants might also seep in and break down the contact cement holding your ski laminate layers and edges together so I don't use any lubricants on my ski bases anywhere.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

But Vaseline can seep in around the edges over time and discolor the bases, possibly (I do not know this for a fact) also weakening the adhesives that hold the ski together.
Oh!  Good to know - thanks!  I will use wax instead, as you suggested.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

George Romney (HUD secy, father of Mitt), then chairman of Rambler (American Motors) actually sent my wife's grandfather a letter about the leaking trunk, telling him to drill holes to let the water out.

Wonder why they went outta' bidness .... ?? 
 
Hah, tell me about it.  My high school/college car was a 1983 AMC...piece of junk.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post

So where do you put it?  I had originally assumed you used it for flying / checking baggage, which is how I used mine. If your skis are riding on the inside of your vehicle, why do you bother putting them in the tube to begin with? Why not just let them travel loose like everyone else?

Something I'm not getting here....
Good point.  I bought the tube for flying, but then got it in my head that it was for anytime the skis are transported.  So yes, I do put the skis in the tube and then just put the tube inside the car.  But I guess you're right - this isn't really necessary.  I do always have a lot of tools and such in the trunk, so I guess my mental process is that the tube protects the skis from getting scraped on the tools, but there's a more obvious solution to this - remove the tools!


Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Why not?   
I drive a VW Jetta, and I don't have a roof rack to put them on.


Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



+1 on the old candle to fill any gaps that the slathering of hot wax might not be covering.  I put a couple of strategically placed holes at the bottom of my Thule box which allows the small amounts of water from the snow melt or incidental leakage to escape. I don't scrape until I arrive ready to ski,  And, I dry the skis and rub wax on the edges immediately when I arrive home because I might not get around to waxing them again for a day or two..
Vasaline prevents wax from sticking to your edges.  Petrolium based lubricants might also seep in and break down the contact cement holding your ski laminate layers and edges together so I don't use any lubricants on my ski bases anywhere.
 
Thank you for the detailed explanation!
Edited by chase - 1/24/10 at 5:21pm
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Should I drill holes at the ends of my SportTube, to drain H2O?