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Backflip question

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
 Please don't flame me about how dangerous this is I am aware. 

Anyways I am very proficient at flips on diving boards and trampolines and have been thinking about transferring it to my skiing and had a quick question. Its not so much about the mechanics of the flip itself but about how the skis affect my rotation.

From a physics stand point the extra weight from skis and boots will cause a slight lowering of my center of gravity. Is it enough to notice and if so is it enough to cause any changes in the feeling/mechanics. My experience from spins is that it will affect it a little but not enough to worry about. Any help is appreciated.   

Lonewolf
post #2 of 13
As much as I'd love to, I never got to the point where I was doing aerials in the park. That being said, I think many of us here on the forums have seen training videos for the freestyle and aerials competitors who take their skis and boards onto trampolines to practice with the extra weight and rotation there before going out onto the snow. That sounds to me like a smart plan.

Maybe you could find a training area near you or near your home mountain, or at least ask around to find out what you need to set up a trampoline so you can safely practice. I'm guessing lots of crash pads...

Good luck!
post #3 of 13
 I have never done this in park to freaking scared....

but I have done this in utah the skis do add weight you need to throw its slight harder than on a trampoline. As you know 100 percent commitment and nothing less or youll get hurt.

I would honestly find deep snow to jump into with a steep landing IMO. 
post #4 of 13
 Don't you know how dangerous this is?

Better have your helmet on!
post #5 of 13

If you are dialed in on the trampoline, the next step would be train the trick on a water ramp or a foam pit.  The consequences are considerably less severe in those environments.  Master the trick there and you are ready to try it on the snow--and you will know exactly how your equipment is going to affect how the trick feels in the air. 

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
 were can I find a foam pit or water ramp near Colorado Springs? 
post #7 of 13
Colorado Springs?  Is that one of those cities I've heard about that are supposed to exist East of the mountains?   

Can't help you with that, but the next time you are up in Summit County, you should check out Camp Woodward at Copper: http://www.woodwardatcopper.com/site/ourprograms/barnsessions/index.html.  You'd need to sign up for the One Hit Wonder (orientation) first and then you could do Drop In Sessions to get your back flip perfected.  Alternatively, you could do a winter camp in lieu of the One Hit Wonder: http://www.woodwardatcopper.com/site/ourprograms/campday/index.html

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
 that one hit wonder seems pretty cool i might hit it up this weekend if i can finds a car to get up there
post #9 of 13
I went through this myself in about 1976 in Vail.  My friends had built a kicker on the hillside up above their condo and one of them was doing backs and Mobius's - thought it was my turn.

No one else was there.  I put on my skiis, walked up about 60 feet above the kicker and stood there for 45 minutes staring at the kicker and thinking about it (visualizing).  I finally went, threw myself up and back, looked for the landing and hit it.  I WAS REALLY LUCKY.

Yes, your center of gravity is lower (you pivot maybe around your belly) and you come around more slowly.  First, you need the right kicker - steep.  Next, a steep landing so you don't hit hard.  Truly, I would try it on water first, if you can.  Next best would be a trampoline, but that's rather dangerous too with skis (use a rope spotter).  A helmet won't help you if you land short - its your neck.

Eventually I used to go upside down a lot, but what these guys do today scares the heck out of me.  Just do what you're capable of - please don't risk your whole life for the sake of a stupid video clip.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

 Please don't flame me about how dangerous this is I am aware. 

Anyways I am very proficient at flips on diving boards and trampolines and have been thinking about transferring it to my skiing and had a quick question. Its not so much about the mechanics of the flip itself but about how the skis affect my rotation.

From a physics stand point the extra weight from skis and boots will cause a slight lowering of my center of gravity. Is it enough to notice and if so is it enough to cause any changes in the feeling/mechanics. My experience from spins is that it will affect it a little but not enough to worry about. Any help is appreciated.   

Lonewolf
post #10 of 13
The Olympic park in Park City, UT has a great water ramp. 

I skied with the Australian Aerial development team for about five years teaching them skiing.  These ladies are all world class gymnasts before entering the aerial ski arena.  For them it is a multi-year process to graduate to flips on the snow.  Perfection on the water is the pre-requisite.
JF
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 


Eventually I used to go upside down a lot, but what these guys do today scares the heck out of me.  Just do what you're capable of - please don't risk your whole life for the sake of a stupid video clip.

 


 

I appreciate the concern. Good news is its not for a video clip just something I want to try. I have really enjoyed doing flips and inverted stuff. Between rock climbing, diving and a very very small stint in parkour I have become very comfortable with heights and inversion. The doing what I am capable of is the part I am trying to maintain. I have bad habit of thinking of something and than just doing it. I have had more than one friend think I was little crazy because of that. So far I have been able to judge my abilities well but I don't want to get in over my head.   
post #12 of 13
Yes, that's the part that's hard for a 3rd party to judge.  Even at my age, I also do things that my friends say are really stupid (especially doctors), but having skill / natural coordination and the ability to visualize does make a difference.  Going upside down, though, is very risky so just build in an extra safety factor.  In the 70s people just went for it, but its not what I would advise.  Once you learn the "feel" of it in a safe way, then the real thing on snow will be much easier.

Good luck,

Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

So far I have been able to judge my abilities well but I don't want to get in over my head.   
post #13 of 13
Good luck and go for it! 

I was a gymnast before skiing and always wanted to try some of this stuff but I never got up the money, resources and nerve to just try it and at 45 I still sort of regret I never went for it.  I didn't start skiing until I was 17 and I had my first child and got married before 20, so I had a family to look after and worried about getting hurt too much. 

Sounds like you're doing it sensibly and those camps look like a great idea.  I hope you let us know how it goes when you finally make that leap.
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