New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Pseudo Hop turns?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
There is a turn, which I do not possess, that I'd sure like to learn.  Skiing with friends in the trees,I notice the two guys I was with, doing a mock hop turn.  They'd seem to hop the tail of ski around very quickly, but the tip didn't leave the ground.  Very effective turn in this tight situation while I seemed to struggle to control speed and not smack a tree, they just sort of boogied through. Very impressive What was that and how do I do it??

I didn't get the chance to ask them, after the run we parted ways and didn't catch up again.  Can someone help me with this??
post #2 of 10
 did you try it?

its doesnt matter what it is its just turn with alot of tail unweighting maybe even a mid air pivot.

tree skiing aint a science its an art.
post #3 of 10
 Do you have a hop turn? How do you do in bumps?
post #4 of 10
Sounds like they're pivoting the skis around the tips rather than under the feet.  Effective in a tight spot, but not very efficient.
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Sounds like they're pivoting the skis around the tips rather than under the feet.  Effective in a tight spot, but not very efficient.

eh could be a dolphin turn or a turn where the pivot is under their foot with the tips tracing the snow.. or you could be right. In the end its just schematics. its important to realize though that effective and staying up right is better than efficient and falling.

basically effective and efficient tree skiers have some pretty basic requirements....

1. Strong core motionless upperbody never ever follow the skis in tight trees. I would actually contend that if you can follow your skis at all your not in 'tight trees" 

2. a strong retraction transition 

3. COM moves  down the hill no matter what 

4. the ability to use different amount of skidding and carving to make different size but other wise complete turns

5. redirecting hop turns with varying pivot point and amount of actually turning.

6. never stop moving 

7. the ability to improvise when all of the above fails.
post #6 of 10
If I'm understanding this correctly, you would need a softer ski?
post #7 of 10
"Ruade" , a maneuver accomplishedby pressing the knees forward and hoping using the skis tips as a pivot point for the turn ( introduced by Emile Allais ).
Don't know if this is what they were doing , but sort of sounds like it .
post #8 of 10
"pressing the knees forward and hoping...."

That sums it up pretty well, for most skiers, spinoza! Unless, of course, you mean "hopping."

Quote:
1. Strong core motionless upperbody never ever follow the skis in tight trees. I would actually contend that if you can follow your skis at all your not in 'tight trees" 

2. a strong retraction transition 

3. COM moves  down the hill no matter what 

4. the ability to use different amount of skidding and carving to make different size but other wise complete turns

5. redirecting hop turns with varying pivot point and amount of actually turning.

6. never stop moving 

7. the ability to improvise when all of the above fails.

Good stuff, BWPA!

And, to the point of the original post, I especially agree with your point #5 about the ability to create varying pivot points, at will and as needed, for maneuvering in tight spots. Just hopping the tails around (with or without hope!) is a defensive movement pattern that can stop your momentum quickly, but is of limited use for quick, offensive direction changes. Consider that it involves moving your skis right to start a left turn. And consider the consequences if there is a tree in the way....

Best regards,
Bob
post #9 of 10
Hop and hope , Yikes !
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Very useful, and I just read a post by Bob Barnes on another thread, discussing runs through the trees.  Good stuff.

Thanks all.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching