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Skiing Pretty - Page 4

post #91 of 111
Looking at the video posted by Holiday above, I had a thought, bearing in mind the Killy videos I've seen lately.
If we dissect Holiday's video into parts, there are some parts that look prettier than others.  Where it looks like the skier wants to go a certain way and the mountain wants the skier to go that way too, it looks prettier than where the skier is deliberately resisting; some of the speed control isn't as pretty as other parts of the skiing. 

I just have to search my memory to last saturday for a better example, unfortunately no video, but it's the thought that counts.  Snow conditions were very good and the snow was pushed into piles of grippy snow, but not what I would call moguls.  As you may know I recently got my old P50 F1s on the hill and they work so much better at speed than my SCs.  I had taken the SCs out of the car as I was skiing with my daughter who skis very conservatively around other skiers.  I was coming up on the last steep drop before the run-out to the lift line, having turned perpendicular to the fall line to give myself a little time to scout it out and make sure I wasn't going to run over a line of ski-school children snaking their way across the entire hill.  Normally I would have just dropped in without thought, but I got to thinking, "These SCs weren't really made for 50 mph turns through clumps of snow."  So, despite the fact that there was a completely open slope below me I decided to dump some speed.  I made two braking turns, before pointing them at the bottom.   I bashed my way through a few piles of snow while braking and turning across the hill (the nature of the surface alternating between big pile of snow and scraped off hard-pack causing a somewhat stataco braking effect), and then pointed my skis down and snaked my way through the crud piles.   The breaking turns were I think technically proficient, but also, I think looked ugly.   The snaking down the hill, I think looked prettier (even though I can only see them in my mind).  Both types of turns done with the same degree of ineptitude, but different levels of aestetic beauty.

Fighting the mountain = ugly.  Skiing in harmony with the mountain = pretty.
post #92 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post




First, Welcome to EpicSki.   Nice to have you.  Skiing effortlessly and smoothly will  come, you have set your goals and they are attainable.  Lessons, perserverance, pratice, and more lessons will help.  However don't forget the most important ingrediant to good skiing:   Time on the snow and having Fun with a smile on your face.  The Fun factor and personal satisfaction of watching yourself progress will bring you back every winter season to a lifetime of winter happiness, challenge and satisfaction of knowing you too can effortlessly ski the mountain.

Thanks, Pete.

I agree completely.  The fun factor is pretty much what life is about for me.  I have several friends who are very experienced and excellent skiers so catching up a bit will be nice but I have no problem wishing them well as they head off for the double blacks and leave me to my groomers :-)

I do envy the grace and ease with which good skiers cruise the mountain but that's true in any sport.  Once you have the equipment right and have an instructor who dismantles the mechanics into individual parts that can be put back together one at a time the learning curve is pretty much exponential.  My only regret is that I didn't take my first lesson until my third trip and 10th day on the slopes but even after three trips I can see that ti will be a matter of time, instruction and practice.  The annoyingly resolute stubborness to do somethign until I have it right was genetic so I am ahead of the game.

Sigh... sucks to look out the window at Dallas after ten days in the Rockies :-)
post #93 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

Definitely, rhythm and flow are the meat and potatoes, if you will, of pretty skiing. I hope the guys who are speaking up here (there aren't many women active on EpicSki, are there? A matter for another thread, perhaps...) understand that I'm not trying to create a gender dichotomy. It's not just women in this group but also seniors, and I reckon with the aging population, instructors of both genders will want to know how to connect with their motivations, aspirations, and self-concepts. 
 


Hear here. I'm a guy and I aspire to smooth and even turns. It's all about timing and pressure control.

In a lesson a few days ago at the top of a black bump run under heavy snow, our instructor said "ski down these bumps as the water would run down the hill." Our group transformed from a pack of charging gorillas into a school of dolphins flowing downstream. Imagine the lightness of the foot and the ease of the turns in such skiing. I could ski like that all day without getting tired. And now I do. 
post #94 of 111
It sounds boring to ski "Pretty".
post #95 of 111
It is technically challenging to "ski pretty."  Good skiers aspire to it.  Accomplished racers and other high level skiers achieve it.  If you are doing it, you know it isn't boring at all.
post #96 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post



Our group transformed from a pack of charging gorillas into a school of dolphins flowing downstream. Imagine the lightness of the foot and the ease of the turns in such skiing. I could ski like that all day without getting tired. And now I do. 

The real shizzle is skiing pretty and charging.
post #97 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

The other day a male friend, a strong athletic skier, confided that he was puzzled about something his wife had said--that she'd like to become a better skier but she doesn't want to ski like him. What does that mean, he wondered. 

 
I could mean that she has been married a long time.
post #98 of 111
A couple of years ago when I was on the hill training to take my level 3 exam, my mentor, Archie Noon (He's 91 and still skiing and teaching), saw me working on a few things.  He called me over and asked me to take a run and really "rip it up"!   I headed down the hill and skied pretty aggressively all the way down.  He met me at the bottom and said, "that was great, but now I want you to ski (in a pretty crazy french accent) "elegant".  I took a run and really concentrated on my rhythm and flow.  I actually felt like I was dancing!  I had never really thought of skiing in that way and I really enjoyed it!  When I got to the bottom of the hill, Archie came over and gave me a huge bear hug, and said "That was (again in that crazy french accent) Elegant"!  "That's Level 3"!.  I took that experience to my exam at the end of the season and I guess Archie was right because I passed.  So, I guess my answer to your question at the beginning of this thread
Quote:  My question is, can skiing pretty be a kind of good skiing, or is it just good intermediate skiing, since it's done mostly on groomed runs?
is ABSOLUTELY!  When you are on an intermediate run and skiing pretty, things are slowed down which always brings out the flaws in your skiing if you have them. 

In response to your second question: 
    Quote:

     The question for instructors is, can you adjust your values to meet this person's wants    and needs, or are you going to lose her after one lesson?

I would say that if you're teaching Student Centered like we're supposed to, than you're not doing your job right if you don't.  When I first started teaching, I would start my lesson by watching my student ski and then decide what I thought they needed to improve on.  Now when I teach, I ask the student what it is that they're looking to achieve or improve on.  I get a lot more requests as well as repeat customers since I changed to this approach!
 
post #99 of 111
Thread Starter 
Snowmiser, from your post (not to mention numerous others) you are "full cert"!

My belief: Meet your students where they live, and work with them, not on them.
post #100 of 111
Amen to that Nolo!  "Full Cert" or not, it's how you should teach.  Hope you didn't think I was bragging, I was just sharing an experience.
post #101 of 111
Thread Starter 
I didn't think you were bragging at all--grateful for sharing your wisdom is more like it! 
post #102 of 111
O.k. Cool~ Great topic by the way!!! :D
post #103 of 111
 
Edited by Snowmiser - 4/5/10 at 5:01pm
post #104 of 111

Ah, this is the thread I was looking for!  I am someone who skis "pretty", but I want to ski harder terrain.  I am bored.  I've signed up for a clinic where I live, but I was really disappointed in my first lesson.  I feel like the instructor wants to completely dismantle my 29 years of skiing.  I don't want that.  I am willing to humble myself and learn, but I really am not connecting with my instructor.  Do I really have to undo my skiing and build back up something completely different to handle harder terrain with skill and confidence?  Specifically, I really want to ski moguls and not be scared of them.  I've been reading a lot of these threads and this is the first one that addresses the question of what the feminine perspective is and what some/most women want out of their skiing experience.

post #105 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmmountainmom View Post

Ah, this is the thread I was looking for!  I am someone who skis "pretty", but I want to ski harder terrain.  I am bored.  I've signed up for a clinic where I live, but I was really disappointed in my first lesson.  I feel like the instructor wants to completely dismantle my 29 years of skiing.  I don't want that.  I am willing to humble myself and learn, but I really am not connecting with my instructor.  Do I really have to undo my skiing and build back up something completely different to handle harder terrain with skill and confidence?  Specifically, I really want to ski moguls and not be scared of them.  I've been reading a lot of these threads and this is the first one that addresses the question of what the feminine perspective is and what some/most women want out of their skiing experience.


Without seeing you ski, there is no way to say for certain, but in all likelihood you do need to undo your skiing and start over.  To ski with finesse, you must let the ski turn you instead of you turning the ski.  The vast majority of skiers do the latter because the ski itself is a completely counterintuitive tool.  Without accurate instruction, the movements you will naturally develop on your own are generally going to be exactly the opposite of what you should be doing.  Unless you come from a race background or have otherwise had access to high quality coaching, it would be surprising if you have developed an understanding of and a mastery of the fundamental movements that you need for quality skiing.

 

This thread is a bit misleading in premise.  If you understand how skiing works and implement those movements in your skiing, you will be able to ski anything with finesse and low impact.  If you do not wish to ski fast, you will have the skills to ski slow.  Ironically, in many ways, being able to ski slowly is more the mark of a true expert than someone who skis fast.  Slow skiing requires precision and eliminates the external forces that most skiers use to compensate for technical deficiencies. 

 

The difficulty lies in finding an instructor that can accurately convey the principles that will deliver the kind of skiing *everyone* is looking for.  The starting point should be teaching you how to stand properly on your skis.  You must be able to balance on your outside ski, which means that one footed skiing should be the starting point (you graduate to two feet only after you can manage balance).  From there, you need to learn how to transition from one set of edges to the other; releasing your current edges, transfering your balance and engaging the new ski.  To do this, you must learn to tip your skis using your feet.  Foot tipping is the most important skill in skiing and very few skiers actually do it. Tipping requires you to flex your legs and manage your fore-aft balance through ankle movements and moving your feet forward and backward underneath you.   Once you know how to change edges, you need to learn how to control the arc of the ski and the shape of the turn by continuous tipping throughout the turn.  Finally, you need to learn the correct upper body movements and pole management that will complement what you are doing with your feet.  Only after you own all of these movements are you ready to move into the bumps.

 

If that sounds like what you were getting from your instructor, then he or she has got you on the right track.  Otherwise, I'd look around for a different instructor who explains skiing in a similar fashion as the above. 

post #106 of 111

I've found (with 40 years of skiing) that of course I am full of 4 decades of "hup" turns, feet close together, A-framing, excessive up and down, arms spread out like I'm flying, on and on.  My daughter is a former racer and now a race coach and she knows better than to even bring up with me all my "failings".  It just results in me being pissed. Face it, for 40 years, I've been skiing in a manner than is currently considered "wrong".  Some of the pointers I get I work on, in hopes of at least lessening the impact of the "trained-in" faults.  I am currently working on trying to pull back my inside leg on turns to get closer to eradicating the A frame.  Last year I worked a lot on letting the ski do the turning and rolling in a relaxed manner from one edge to another.  The year before I worked on getting down steeps/deep powder/treed areas (as in, all at once) by "walking my poles" down the hill.  I.E., every time I completed one turn I went into the next turn immediately.  See, I know that when they start taking you all apart that sometimes you give up and end up not "put back together".  It happened to my husband and now he has no confidence at all in his skiing so he has basically STOPPED.  I prefer to work on ONE THING at a time.  With the "at home" instructor available, if I want help about what to work on first, I can get it.  Or, I can read about something here on Epic that interests me and then try it.  But, when I was taking weekly classes (Ladies Day), it just wasn't working.  Most of the time I don't GET what they are saying anyway.  I mostly want what I call "tactical" advice, i.e, the "walking the poles" thing.  I personally don't care about my A frame.  So, like you, I want to know how to approach skiing a mogul field...where to turn, how to turn, etc.  (I have found that keeping my shoulders parallel to the slope of the hill sort of works in certain steep situations with getting down the hill and being ready for the next turn).  But this stuff has to be SLOWLY fed to me.  Taking me apart?  Forget it.  Give me ONE TIP to make me better in whatever situation we are encountering.  That's all I want. 

 

Yeah, I know, I'm a terrible student.  So sue me.  I get out there, I have fun.  I try to do a "challenge" run at least once a day, whether it's trees, steeps, whatever.  Fortunately there is plenty of stuff here I have yet to ski and plenty that I know I can handle on SOME days, but not on others, so I am not bored.  I'm just a donkey when it comes (after 40 years) to re-learning how to ski. 

post #107 of 111

Acknowledging that beauty (as in "Wow, that's skiing!") is in the eye of the beholder, my gold standard is Stein Eriksen. Here's a short sample.

Can it be that the "Wow factor" in skiing also involves the skier's "feel" for the slope and the mountain? Eriksen certainly manifests those intangibles.

post #108 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmmountainmom View Post

Ah, this is the thread I was looking for!  I am someone who skis "pretty", but I want to ski harder terrain.  I am bored.  I've signed up for a clinic where I live, but I was really disappointed in my first lesson.  I feel like the instructor wants to completely dismantle my 29 years of skiing.  I don't want that.  I am willing to humble myself and learn, but I really am not connecting with my instructor.  Do I really have to undo my skiing and build back up something completely different to handle harder terrain with skill and confidence?  Specifically, I really want to ski moguls and not be scared of them.  I've been reading a lot of these threads and this is the first one that addresses the question of what the feminine perspective is and what some/most women want out of their skiing experience.


As someone who started learning to ski 47 years ago, I know right where you're coming from and can appreciate the fact that you want to improve your skills without having to reinvent the wheel.  As a ski school trainer, if we were skiing together I'd be thinking "boy, I'd like to have her do this, then this, and then that... then she'd really be skiing" but I'd adapt to what you wanted to achieve.  My one suggestion:  start with small changes, and focus on stance and balance, as that is foundation of good skiing!  Getting in balance on you skis in an athletic stance will give you the best start on gaining the new skills you need to improve your skiing in the bumps.

 

Mike

post #109 of 111


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffda View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by nmmountainmom View Post

Ah, this is the thread I was looking for!  I am someone who skis "pretty", but I want to ski harder terrain.  I am bored.  I've signed up for a clinic where I live, but I was really disappointed in my first lesson.  I feel like the instructor wants to completely dismantle my 29 years of skiing.  I don't want that.  I am willing to humble myself and learn, but I really am not connecting with my instructor.  Do I really have to undo my skiing and build back up something completely different to handle harder terrain with skill and confidence?  Specifically, I really want to ski moguls and not be scared of them.  I've been reading a lot of these threads and this is the first one that addresses the question of what the feminine perspective is and what some/most women want out of their skiing experience.


....  To ski with finesse, you must let the ski turn you instead of you turning the ski.  icon14.gif  (let the skis do the work)

 

....  If you understand how skiing works and implement those movements in your skiing, you will be able to ski anything with finesse and low impact.  If you do not wish to ski fast, you will have the skills to ski slow.  Ironically, in many ways, being able to ski slowly is more the mark of a true expert than someone who skis fast.  Slow skiing requires precision and eliminates the external forces that most skiers use to compensate for technical deficiencies. icon14.gificon14.gif  (so true as well as answering Nolo's original question.  Yes good skiing can be slow)

 

....  The starting point should be teaching you how to stand properly on your skis.  icon14.gif  (stance)

 

You must be able to balance on your outside ski, which means that one footed skiing should be the starting point.  th_dunno-1[1].gif  (balance)

 

From there, you need to learn how to transition from one set of edges to the other; releasing your current edges, transfering your balance and engaging the new ski.  To do this, you must learn to tip your skis using your feet.  Foot tipping is the most important skill in skiing and very few skiers actually do it.   (working on this)

 

Tipping requires you to flex your legs and manage your fore-aft balance through ankle movements and moving your feet forward and backward underneath you.     (need advice on this)

 

Once you know how to change edges, you need to learn how to control the arc of the ski and the shape of the turn by continuous tipping throughout the turn.  Finally, you need to learn the correct upper body movements and pole management that will complement what you are doing with your feet.  Only after you own all of these movements are you ready to move into the bumps.

 

 


Jan 25, 2011

 

Hi Geoffda and Fellow Bears:

 

I agree with everything Geoffda said above.  This season I've been working on "letting the skis turn" instead of "twisting" the skis at the top of the turn (high C).  Also practicing all moves on "blue" trails as well as at a very slow (speed wise) tempo.  I would just like to add to your excellent comments, that whenever one starts to change/correct/improve any of our old movement patterns on skis, it would be advisable to practicing on a slope with a gradual angle of descent which one feels comfortable on and is not skiing in intimidation mode.  

 

I do have two questions for you, the first question, I agree with your point of view, but would find it hard for most skiers to perform, the second one is something which I have been working on and would like your advice.

 

(a)  One footed skiing should be the starting point.    I agree with the fact that one footed skiing is an important skill which one should be able to perform in order to get into more advance skiing.  As a skier who has spent some time on the master's program of my local race club, I do have some of these skills such as outside edge to outside edge, whitepass turns and skiing on one ski.  However, I would think that for most skiers it would be (1) difficult (2) requires a lot of time and practice to obtain these skills, although, these two items should not be construed as viable excuses not to put in the time and effort.  But as a starting point, isn't this drastic and might it not be an impediment to most skiers to develop higher advanced skiing skills?  Can you suggest any other ways/means for the rest of us to develop good balance and stance on skis, instead of starting out mastering one footed skiing?  Or does one footed skiing not only develop good balance and stance but also imparts other important skills which a good skier should possess?

 

(b) moving your foot forward and backward beneath you.  Could you expound on this statement as well as how one would move one's foot forward and backward beneath one's core.  Would you move it backward by a "backward pull" and forward by a "frontal shove", or by "dorsiflexion" or by a combination of the two moves?  I've been working on this coupled with "patience" to round out the top of my turns and let the skis turns instead of helping them turn with a pivot move.  Also, could you clarify how this helps in "tipping" the foot?

 

Thanks, and think snow,

 

CP

post #110 of 111

Hi CharlieP,

 

One footed skiing, while useful in the literal sense, is simply about learning to balance on the outside ski.  A simple. non-threatening way to learn that is: (from a relatively narrow stance) lift the tail of the inside ski slightly and then tip.  It is helpful if when you do this, you pull the lifted ski back and try to touch the edge of the lifted ski to your other boot.  If you think about this as a dry land exercise, the equivalent would be lifting (for example), your right foot and trying to touch the sole of that foot to your left ankle.  Ultimately instead of lifting, you progress to flexing down onto the tipped ski.   At that point you start to build angles. 

 

One footed skiing develops balance and balance awareness; both of which are required before you can learn how to properly use your skis.  If you want to ski difficult conditions, you must be able to balance on your outside ski.  What I have described above (otherwise known as "the Phantom Move") is a very basic, non-threatening and user-friendly way to develop this skill (and it teaches other things as well).  In terms of just daily skiing, linking Phantom Moves (which involves one-footed releases) is the best way for anyone who is truly wishing to develop skiiing skills to start.  As I mentioned earlier, this is the entry-level; eventually the movements of the intermediate Phantom Move get refined and you end up with high level carved turns with inside ski loading and performance.

 

Moving your skis back and forth underneath you is as you say.  Think of pulling your feet back to move forward.  I don't generally think of shoving your feet forward to move back though.  Simply think of pressuring the heel. The reason for this is that getting in the back seat is a common problem for everyone, and it requires an aggressive movement to recover.  Getting too far forward really isn't an issue (unless you are skiing in soft boots) so typically when you are making an aft adjustment, you are just trying to shift leverage; i.e. you want to be aft balanced but not in the back seat.  Even in the case of being extremely forward, it isn't so much that you need to push your feet forward as you just need to stop holding them back.  Just allow your boots to rebalance you (which they should if they are stiff enough and set up correctly).  Hard to describe, but it makes sense when you do it.

  

For those wishing to learn what forward really means, try this.  Standing in your skis on the flat, try to slide your feet back behind you enough so that you actually cause the tails of your ski to lift.  If you can, have somebody hold your head while you do this, so you ensure that you are really doing a pull back.  Once you can do that, try doing it while moving straight on a gentle slope.  Pull your feet back to lift the tails, then let yourself move back to neutral, then repeat. Then try some garlands where you start in a gentle traverse, and incorporate tipping at the same time you pull your feet back.  Doing this drill will get you in touch with where forward really is and most importantly, it will show you how to get out of the back seat when it happens.  Most skiers experience a pretty big confidence boost once they understand the mechanics of getting out of the back seat.

 

Along with pulling both feet back, simply pulling (or holding) the inside ski back can have a profound effect on fore-aft balance.  Often, that movement may be all that is necessary as a recentering move.  Which is one of the reasons why the intermediate Phantom Move works so well.  If you focus on the cue of touching your boot with the edge of the lifted ski (under the lifted boot) then you will have been forced to pull your inside foot back.  Not to mention the fact that the lifting forced you to both release your old turn and caused a balance transfer to the new outside ski...

 

Dorsi-flexion/plantar flexion are good fine-tuning movements.  If you are aft balanced and want to move forward, just flex your ankle (some people think about feeling the top of the boot with their toes).  Likewise, to pressure the heel, you just open the ankle.  You can also combine dorsiflexion with a foot pullback to move immediately to a forward balanced position.  I tend to do this a lot when bump skiing.

 

In terms of the effect on fore-aft with tipping, it is pretty easy to demonstrate.  Stand perpendicular on a slope with your skis together and tip your uphill ski as far as you can.  Then slide your uphill ski forward a foot or so and try to tip it.  What you should see is that you have a significantly decreased ability to tip from that position.  Tipping the skis works best when your feet are underneath your hips and your legs are slightly flexed.  In terms of the effect of fore and aft generally on ski performance, if you are forward balanced, the tip of the ski will get pressure and will bite and bend more aggressively, tightening the arc.  If you are aft balanced, the tail will bite best, allowing a clean finish to the arc.  So to get the most performance out of your skis, you would typically want to move forward as you establish the arc and then allow the skis to come forward (with your balance therefore moving aft) to finish the turn.

post #111 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffda View Post

Hi CharlieP,

 

One footed skiing, while useful in the literal sense, is simply about learning to balance on the outside ski.  A simple. non-threatening way to learn that is: (from a relatively narrow stance) lift the tail of the inside ski slightly and then tip.  It is helpful if when you do this, you pull the lifted ski back and try to touch the edge of the lifted ski to your other boot.  If you think about this as a dry land exercise, the equivalent would be lifting (for example), your right foot and trying to touch the sole of that foot to your left ankle.  Ultimately instead of lifting, you progress to flexing down onto the tipped ski.   At that point you start to build angles. 

 

One footed skiing develops balance and balance awareness; both of which are required before you can learn how to properly use your skis.  If you want to ski difficult conditions, you must be able to balance on your outside ski.  What I have described above (otherwise known as "the Phantom Move") is a very basic, non-threatening and user-friendly way to develop this skill (and it teaches other things as well).  In terms of just daily skiing, linking Phantom Moves (which involves one-footed releases) is the best way for anyone who is truly wishing to develop skiiing skills to start.  As I mentioned earlier, this is the entry-level; eventually the movements of the intermediate Phantom Move get refined and you end up with high level carved turns with inside ski loading and performance.

 

Moving your skis back and forth underneath you is as you say.  Think of pulling your feet back to move forward.  I don't generally think of shoving your feet forward to move back though.  Simply think of pressuring the heel. The reason for this is that getting in the back seat is a common problem for everyone, and it requires an aggressive movement to recover.  Getting too far forward really isn't an issue (unless you are skiing in soft boots) so typically when you are making an aft adjustment, you are just trying to shift leverage; i.e. you want to be aft balanced but not in the back seat.  Even in the case of being extremely forward, it isn't so much that you need to push your feet forward as you just need to stop holding them back.  Just allow your boots to rebalance you (which they should if they are stiff enough and set up correctly).  Hard to describe, but it makes sense when you do it.  (yes, makes a lot of sense, very much like the foot squirt which Epic started a thread on).

  

For those wishing to learn what forward really means, try this.  Standing in your skis on the flat, try to slide your feet back behind you enough so that you actually cause the tails of your ski to lift.  If you can, have somebody hold your head while you do this, so you ensure that you are really doing a pull back.  Once you can do that, try doing it while moving straight on a gentle slope.  Pull your feet back to lift the tails, then let yourself move back to neutral, then repeat. Then try some garlands where you start in a gentle traverse, and incorporate tipping at the same time you pull your feet back.  Doing this drill will get you in touch with where forward really is and most importantly, it will show you how to get out of the back seat when it happens.  Most skiers experience a pretty big confidence boost once they understand the mechanics of getting out of the back seat.

 

Along with pulling both feet back, simply pulling (or holding) the inside ski back can have a profound effect on fore-aft balance.  Often, that movement may be all that is necessary as a recentering move.  Which is one of the reasons why the intermediate Phantom Move works so well.  If you focus on the cue of touching your boot with the edge of the lifted ski (under the lifted boot) then you will have been forced to pull your inside foot back.  Not to mention the fact that the lifting forced you to both release your old turn and caused a balance transfer to the new outside ski...

 

Dorsi-flexion/plantar flexion are good fine-tuning movements.  If you are aft balanced and want to move forward, just flex your ankle (some people think about feeling the top of the boot with their toes).  Likewise, to pressure the heel, you just open the ankle.  You can also combine dorsiflexion with a foot pullback to move immediately to a forward balanced position.  I tend to do this a lot when bump skiing.  (agree)

 

In terms of the effect on fore-aft with tipping, it is pretty easy to demonstrate.  Stand perpendicular on a slope with your skis together and tip your uphill ski as far as you can.  Then slide your uphill ski forward a foot or so and try to tip it.  What you should see is that you have a significantly decreased ability to tip from that position.  Tipping the skis works best when your feet are underneath your hips and your legs are slightly flexed.  In terms of the effect of fore and aft generally on ski performance, if you are forward balanced, the tip of the ski will get pressure and will bite and bend more aggressively, tightening the arc.  If you are aft balanced, the tail will bite best, allowing a clean finish to the arc.  So to get the most performance out of your skis, you would typically want to move forward as you establish the arc and then allow the skis to come forward (with your balance therefore moving aft) to finish the turn.  (exactly what another Bear told me in a PM.  If one is not forward but even centered or back, one loses the a lot of ability to tip the ski)

 

Jan 26, 2011

 

Hi Geoffda:

 

Thanks for your detailed reply.  About the one footed skiing, the Phantom move is something which I can do and it does help is making my turns fluid.  Again, I agree that one footed skiing is a crucial skill for one to be able to perform for balance, stance and many other reasons.  I remember that once on a stretch of ice, my down hill ski gave way from under my body, but since I was also carving on my uphill ski, it took over and got me through the problem.  

 

About a skier "can't be too far forward", I remember an article which your Coach Olle Larsson wrote for Ski (or Skiing) maybe 15 years ago.  He mentioned that a skier could never be too far forward and suggested that one should ski like the "cowboy drawing his gun and rushing into a saloon"biggrin.gif.    Working the skis so that one uses the front edge at the top of the turn one while using the tail edges at the bottom is certainly the mark of a good skier.  I'm working on getting the ski to edge (not pivot) at or close to the top of the turn.

 

Thanks again and Think snow,

 

CP

 

 

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