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Best Mid-Atlantic Skiing? - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonrpen View Post


That's the way I see it. How is it working out for you?

I don't go there enough to really notice anything.  It is definitely a local joint and probably where most junior high and high school kid's parents buy passes for since it is right across town from the schools.  That also attracts the ski clubs from local schools.  I have to admit I was one of those local kids at that age at the local bump every day after school and most weekends skiing on the Freestyle Team.  Not much has changed, only the tools we put on our feet.
In all fairness though, I was one of the better behaved kids and had respect for my elders, but a lot of other kids I hung out with did not.  I guess that is why Appalachian seems quite normal to me.  Still the terrain (<400 vert) is also typical of an suburban Midwest dump so I usually only go there at then end of the season when they are the only place left with decent coverage.  And, by then most of the local punks are at the skateboard park.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euripides33 View Post

I am organizing a ski trip for presidents day weekend to somewhere in the Mid-Atlantic, and I was wondering what the best bet would be. My initial thought was Snowshoe, as I think it has the best terrain, but the crowds there are insane on holidays. Does anyone know of some good alternatives? I have heard some talk about Canaan Valley and Timberline, but I have never been to either. Any suggestions for a mountain with decent terrain and managible crowds about 8 hours or less from Cincinnat would be great.

http://www.dcski.com/articles/view_article.php?article_id=988&mode=search
Earlier I said Canaan Valley/Timberline WV was a good choice.  But now providing link to trip report for President's weekend at Blue Knob, 2007.  It wasn't too crowded even though conditions were primo.  Not sure of your definition for "decent terrain", but if you mean true black diamond challenge, Blue Knob is the place for that in the mid-Atlantic.  It's a couple hours east of Pittsburgh via the PA turnpike.  I'm partial to Blue Knob because I've skied there since the 1960s, but a recommendation for it comes with a caveat.  Not known for "resort" amenities although there are some basic mountaintop condos with pool and hot tub.  AND you have to monitor carefully that snow conditions are reasonably good for date of your visit, their snowmaking capacity is not the best. But it can be considerably less expensive to visit than places like Snowshoe or Seven Springs.  Truly the best skiing in the mid-Atlantic when the snow is there.
post #33 of 42
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone to all the input. I think I am going to decide between Timberline/Canaan and Blue Knob. I have been to HV, Seven Springs and Snowshoe already, so I want to branch out a bit.
For those who asked for more information: I will probably be going with a group of 6-12 people with skiers of all abilities. Two of us are very strong and I dont really see being challenged at any of these mountains (I could be wrong here, but I've never really found anything at Snowshoe diffacult), but there is also a friend of mine who has maybe skied 8 days in his life. We are all over the map.
I'm thinking that the deciding factor is going to be crowds, so if anyone has first had experience with either of these areas on President's Day, I would love some info. Thanks
Edited by Euripides33 - 1/22/10 at 10:55pm
post #34 of 42
I'll go with Jamesj on this one. Blue Knob has the best expert terrain of all the resorts mentioned but the amenities are spartan. There is a lodge and they serve mediocre food. I think there is a better restaurant at the condo complex (which is down mountain but shuttle served) but I never ate there. There is a bar in the lodge which is smoke free. There are two double chairs, the second is only used when the crowds grow. There are 2 triples but one serves only the beginners area and the other can get real crowded.If you're looking for challenge and the snow cover is good, you can't beat Blue Knob.

Folks here have been rather harsh on Seven Springs but they have the most snow making coverage, over 200 acres worth. I always thought the staff was good but crowds can be a problem. Keep to the lifts on the far left as you look at the mountain from the base and you should be able to find reasonable lift lines. Start skiing over there at 8 am on weekends and you'll have a few hours of relatively empty slopes. Seven Springs also has a lot to do off slope too, even some shopping in the small retail shops in the hotel complex plus several restaurants and all of this is under one roof. The only complaint I have with Seven Springs is there is no really steep terrain but they do allow bumps to grow on Goosebumps and on parts of Avalanche and Stowe. Backside has 750 ft. vertical and the front about 550 ft. maybe a little more.
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euripides33 View Post

Thanks to everyone to all the input. I think I am going to decide between Timberline/Canaan and Blue Knob.

The skiing at Blue Knob is good, but Timberline can be just as good. Given the crowd concern and the fact that you have skiers all over the ability range, I'd head to Timberline/Canaan.
post #36 of 42
I've been to Canaan, Timberline, and Wisp over the 3-day weekends.  The lines and crowds at Canaan and Timberline will be less.  Often there are a lot of people at the resorts, but groups and families seem to spend more time standing around and in the cafeteria than skiing.  At Canaan there is a ridiculous flat section between the top and the Far Side of the Moon run, a moderate black that requires poling to reach.  The cafeteria at Canaan is only 4-6 years old, but basic.  Timberline has better terrain than Canaan (longer and steeper in spots) but the lodge is a dump.

Both Canaan and Timberline have very slow lifts.  Their advantage is that for this area they are the best bets for fresh snow.  Average 150 in. a season

Wisp is the best run of the three.  I skied Wisp this past Monday (MLK Monday) in very dense fog in the AM.  Greatly appreciated that the resort reduced the lift tickets to $39 given the conditions.  Wisp does a better job of making snow and opening trails than the two WV resorts.  The crowds are bigger, but it has three aspects and once you get past the front lodge side, the other parts of the mountain are much less crowded.  Also, better amenities at Wisp.
post #37 of 42
whiteface duh! upstate New york isnt really mid atlantic i guess, but people are talking about michigan so why not head up to lake placid its probably just as close and has the more vertical drop than anywhere else mentioned here
post #38 of 42
Not "just as close".  Whiteface would add about 4 or 5 hours to the trip each way vs. the WV or PA resorts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by juhocha View Post

whiteface duh! upstate New york isnt really mid atlantic i guess, but people are talking about michigan so why not head up to lake placid its probably just as close and has the more vertical drop than anywhere else mentioned here
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurel Hill Crazie View Post

I'll go with Jamesj on this one. Blue Knob has the best expert terrain of all the resorts mentioned but the amenities are spartan. There is a lodge and they serve mediocre food. I think there is a better restaurant at the condo complex (which is down mountain but shuttle served) but I never ate there. There is a bar in the lodge which is smoke free. There are two double chairs, the second is only used when the crowds grow. There are 2 triples but one serves only the beginners area and the other can get real crowded.If you're looking for challenge and the snow cover is good, you can't beat Blue Knob.

Folks here have been rather harsh on Seven Springs but they have the most snow making coverage, over 200 acres worth. I always thought the staff was good but crowds can be a problem. Keep to the lifts on the far left as you look at the mountain from the base and you should be able to find reasonable lift lines. Start skiing over there at 8 am on weekends and you'll have a few hours of relatively empty slopes. Seven Springs also has a lot to do off slope too, even some shopping in the small retail shops in the hotel complex plus several restaurants and all of this is under one roof. The only complaint I have with Seven Springs is there is no really steep terrain but they do allow bumps to grow on Goosebumps and on parts of Avalanche and Stowe. Backside has 750 ft. vertical and the front about 550 ft. maybe a little more.
Agreed. BK is great when they get good snow, which is really about 1 month every 3rd year. Also early march when they typically get extrovert open its worth a visit.

I used to have a pass at 7S for like 4 years. They get the crowds from pittsburgh. But the good news is that they are alot friendlier than the DC locals and their lift system and snow making are beefy enough to support even large crowds. I never had a major problem with crowds so long as I avoided the polarbear and gunnar lifts any time between 10am and 3pm. All other lifts are reasonably uncrowded. The Giant steps and norht pole lifts on the backside and tyrol and wagner on the front being the best options during crowded times IMO.
post #40 of 42
Mid Atlantic Ridge?
post #41 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post



Agreed. BK is great when they get good snow, which is really about 1 month every 3rd year. Also early march when they typically get extrovert open its worth a visit.

I used to have a pass at 7S for like 4 years. They get the crowds from pittsburgh. But the good news is that they are alot friendlier than the DC locals and their lift system and snow making are beefy enough to support even large crowds. I never had a major problem with crowds so long as I avoided the polarbear and gunnar lifts any time between 10am and 3pm. All other lifts are reasonably uncrowded. The Giant steps and norht pole lifts on the backside and tyrol and wagner on the front being the best options during crowded times IMO.
 


Tim, since you moved up to the big leagues 7S replaced the old Gunnar triple with a high speed six and it still draws a crowd. The Giant Steps triple is almost always empty but it is so slow the mob at the high speed Gunnar lift might still beat you to the top. I still count that powder day we shared at a Mid-Atlantic GTG  there as my most fun day ever at Seven Springs. I still smile when I ride the Polar Bear six over the lines we poached... too short but  what a hoot!

By the way, we just had that 1 month every 3rd. year:






post #42 of 42
My home mountain is 7 Springs but I will tell you that it does get crowded on the weekends and I can't disagree that the others on the board about safety and debauchery near the slopes on weekends.   

If you are looking for a resort with an opportunity to party apres-ski, 7 Springs and the Foggy Goggle (great name for a bar at a ski resort) are a good place to hang out.  There is a good amount of greens/blues that are nice, but crowded.  

If you are more serious about getting some serious skiing in, the snow would likely be better at Holiday Valley (which has plenty of night-life as well).   7 Springs is also more likely to get rain instead of snow from time to time, which is bad, and then it turns cold creating some serious ice, which is worse.   

From what I remember, Holiday Valley has more blacks to ski, but not by much. 
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