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Better?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I've been so fortunate I was able to go skiing 2 weeks ago. I tried to calm down the transitions as I was told last time. I think it's better now. I also tried to remove all unnecessary arm movements, but I'm not sure I got it right. You be the judge.

After seeing the first 2 videos (in the camera) I decided to use my shorter poles in the next session. Better right? The longer ones are perfect length for resting on them. :)

If I'm able to ski some more this winter, what should I focus on in terms of improvement?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkWCKVQFjMw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOU0vrAE5wA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ey0PqeQ8B_c

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qubt9ZnF9ls
post #2 of 28
A telephoto lens?

I like the strong edge angles you develop . I also like the right turns for the amount of the turn on edge above the fall line compared to the left turns. The shoulders matching the pitch of the slope is also better on the the right turns than the left ones. I would start you out with trying to add a forward component to your turn initiations (they are pretty lateral), then work on strengthening the outside leg (you lean a lot on the inside ski and lose the outside ski in a couple of spots).
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Hi Rusty!

It's filmed with a bridge camera (Fuji S2000HD). The steep parts were filmed by my wife with the kids waiting, and it was so cold I just couldn't ask her to do it again.

The difference between left and right turns, is that most of the time or just in some parts?

How should the forward component be executed? Are there some good excercises to get the correct feeling?
post #4 of 28
 Practice moving the skis forward and back under you on a flat pitch to develop the feel - then build the same motion with the hips and feet working together and add some edge. Add pitch - I usually have to remember to throw my hips down the mountain to get the skis back to power the initial part of the turn. I've also started to be more patient during the transition AND turn phase - letting the energy of the ski build more gradually than forcing them into the more sudden final shape you have here. THoughtS?
post #5 of 28
 btw, I am no ski coach, so take the above with a grain of salt! Just home with a shoulder injury - lol!
post #6 of 28
Lets look at a few frames from your first Video.




What do you see?
post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
Sorry... I don't know. 

On the last image I see the arm straight out. I got some air in the transition upsetting the rhythm. I'm keeping the balance with the arm, stabilizing.
post #8 of 28
 I got some air in the transition upsetting the rhythm. 
There's the first answer. The transition is the start of a strong or weak turn.
Keep your skis on the Snow! Then you can tip quick and clean.
Next.....SLOW down and work on your edging/pressure skills till you have a better grasp on your movements. Build your edge/pressure into the turn,don't rush it.
If your still with me think about where your Hips/Hands are while your moving down the mountain. 

I'm keeping the balance with the arm, stabilizing.
 For every out of balance movement there is another out of balance movement to recover. Collect your limbs towards your core.

How am I doing?
post #9 of 28
Carl, very nice skiing. Especially in the third clip. I like the way you are able to get that impressive vertical separation. And how you close the turns. You ride them all the way to the end. Shooting across the hill. Not many are able to do that. Congrats. Poles too long? No, just angle them out to the side more. Arms all over the place? Check out Bennie Reich or Byggmark for extrem windmilling. Air in the transition? Kind of cool to have that much rebound. That is for sure not a flaw. The reason for you being lauched off into the air is because you are up-unweighting as you come into your transition. IMHO offcourse. I could be wrong. Check out the retraction turn consept for a more modern SL type of transition. Did not read any of the postings before so I could be repeting or contradicting whatever I say.

BTW, I remember you from a few years back. Good to hear from you again.
post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

 I got some air in the transition upsetting the rhythm. 
There's the first answer. The transition is the start of a strong or weak turn.
Keep your skis on the Snow! Then you can tip quick and clean.
Next.....SLOW down and work on your edging/pressure skills till you have a better grasp on your movements. Build your edge/pressure into the turn,don't rush it.
If your still with me think about where your Hips/Hands are while your moving down the mountain. 

I'm keeping the balance with the arm, stabilizing.
 For every out of balance movement there is another out of balance movement to recover. Collect your limbs towards your core.

How am I doing?

 

I don't think I understand yet. I'm very rusty in thinking skiing atm. Forgive me, but I don't know how to slow down the transitions on the skis I'm using. On a more gs kind of ski I think there is more time to react and work the start of the turn. Maybe it's just something to learn over time?

I'm saying that I put out the arm at that instant to counteract. I don't follow...?
post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 
tdk6, thanks for your kind words. :)

Retraction turn, google tells me that is cross under. I think that is what I'm trying to do. Is it more pronounced on the first clips? If it is, I have a hunch that I'm moving up to be able to plant the pole. That's the reason I'm going back to the shorter poles.
Maybe there's some way to plant the poles differently?

It's nice to be back here, and on skis. I haven't been on snow since last time I was here, but meanwhile my daughter got a brother and my better half and I finally got married. :)
My daughter 3,5 learned to ski during the week we were there btw. It was such a joy to follow her steps. I think that is my happiest moments on skis ever actually.
post #12 of 28
transition is the start of a strong or weak turn.
Keep your skis on the Snow! Then you can tip quick and clean.

SLOW down and work on your edging/pressure skills till you have a better grasp on your movements. Build your edge/pressure into the turn,don't rush it.

I'm saying that I put out the arm at that instant to counteract

 Balance is key, Collect and Project your body. I see imbalance in your skiing not just at that frame time. You are a strong skier with good turns. Just need to get dialed in. Keep honing your moves it will come.
post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
Now I get it I think. :)

Working on collecting the body by practicing in slower (more controlled) speeds. I know that you aren't talking about a specific speed, but a funny thing is that I'm going quite slow in comparison to many other skiers. I had my gps in my pocket and the speeds were most of the time in the range of 50-58 km/h.

I think it's difficult to ski slow. I tend to a-frame if I don't consiously divide weight and ski both feet. I think it's visible on the flat part on the third movie.

You probably know it already but my skis are 11m radius, and they get hysterical(lly funny) quite early. :)

I'm taking your advice with me, focusing on collecting the body more and staying on the snow.
post #14 of 28
 I'm working with a coach now and he has been pushing me to ski slower during technical work. It really forces you to correctly pressure the ski at each point of the turn - ski slow to improve and train, then up the acceleration! Cheers
post #15 of 28
Carl, good to hear about your successfull family business. Soon you will all be skiing together. Anyway, why are you skiing? Freeskiing or gates? Your skis suggest you are an all mountain skier that likes to carve. But if you really wanted to carve and maybe get into racing or modern racing technique then you should get SL skis. Technique vise if you cannot ski slowly you need to rethink. Everything you can do when you ski fast you can do when you ski slower. Speed coveres up flaws in skiing. Since the old style of skiing was to extend into transition to un-weight your skis to initiate the next turn you now have to reverse that movement. This is the hard bit. This you do with simple drills on easy groomers.

Your A-frame problem..... did you ever try to cant your boots? This is something that helped me get away from A-framing.
post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
I'm just freeskiing. I would love to run gates (i have sg and dh skis) but it seems I live in the wrong part of the country, and that senior n00b racing is frowned upon in my country.

Maybe I should give a little background about my skiing history? Well here it goes like i remember it:
When I was a kid, (the early eighties) I refused to go to instructors, and didn't like gates. I was skiing with the feet together leaning backwards. I jumped a lot. Then one winter I got some minor moguls practicing and removed at least the some of the leaning backwards stuff. Then me and my brother tried some of the first snowboards that came and I found them lacking and somehow I got a huge monoski which I had for years. Then the snowboards got better and the first burton Air series came, and from then I was snowboarding.
When the Burton PJ carving boards came I realized I had to have one, and then I started carving. (My first one was dark green with circular saws printed and some gold flake stuff on the tail.)
From there I started running gates, and competed for a few years. I had a gf for a while who had been competing on skis who's father gave me some clues on how to use the poles and the general stance. I think he also taught me telemark on thin skis and low leather boots. During that time -94 I was finished with school and had just done my military services so I got myself a job as a snowboard instructor. The requirement was that I should take the first instructor course level, so I was skiing again for one week.
We did all sorts of, well you know.. And I realized that skiing is fun. However the skis were still without waist (imo) and I could never agree with anybody on skis what a carved turn was.
I ran a lot of "shape of the ski" down the hill when there was less people.
Techniquewise to be successful in alpine snowboard one had to go board flat, rotate into the turn and then stick it. Well just like most skiers does. However, I never liked that kind of turning and it made my lower legs sore. So one day I decided to quit.
At that time the first (working imo) carving skis had just arrived and I got a pair Atomic Beta something and stuck with them. R28 or something like that, but I used them with ess superflex plates so I could cant them plenty. I also got the DH and SG skis before realizing there was nowhere to practice or compete...
Well after that, I kind of drifted away from skiing for years. I'm a proper "never was" one could say.
Then a few years ago I started go skiing with my gf (wife now), and when we rented skis I always got the shortest radius skis I could find, and I started enjoying skiing again. The shorter radius, the less dangerous I am in the slopes.
I'm in it for the g forces, and getting inverted, that's all.
It would be fun trying gates again, but I'm kinda afraid that I'll be dissapointed.

Well that's my story. :)
If you check out my other youtube videos there are some alpine snowboarding there, if you want to see where I come from. I carved/raced snowboards years before carving on skis.

Regarding canting the boots, I read the boot instructions at some time and did what it said, and I came to the conclusion that zero was correct.
post #17 of 28
Great back ground information. An interesting note would be that in your third clip you ski like a snow boarder. You carve a turn and then you go across the slope. You dont see this often done on skis as well as you do it in your clip. I like it.
post #18 of 28
Carl,

I went up today for a short session and worked on constantly moving\projecting my Hips into the transition. This enabled me to be balanced into the transition and make a lighting fast edge change to the next turn. But then you slow your movements down,gradually arch the skis around you and keeping your balance\body moving through the turn.
Tip & Rip.
post #19 of 28
I agree with TDK's view on your skiing. It is refreshingly dynamic and inventive.

Your CoM (center of mass) resides in your torso. When you are skiing now, your CoM is going up and down as well as side to side. You can't keep your skis on the snow because the CoM is tugging your feet up. The vertical motion of your CoM also makes it much harder to be balanced and harder to effectively control your skis as eventually the CoM comes down and when it does it adds pressure to the skis adding effectiveness to whatever you are already doing. This exagerates the effects of your movements.

Imagine a plane (the geometric kind, not the the flying kind) that exists about hip high above the snow when you are in an athletic stance; the stance you land in when you jump up and land on dry land. When you ski, imagine keeping your hips at or below the plane, particularly in the transition. To do that you will have to flex your legs into an athletic stance in transition. Your legs will flex at transition, extend through the turn and return to flexed at the next transition. The flexion and extension is progressive, not abrupt. Keeping your hips at or below the plane will prevent the CoM from going up and down nearly so much.

Let the energy of the skis transfer your skis arcross the hill rather than move your torso up.
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Carl,

I went up today for a short session and worked on constantly moving\projecting my Hips into the transition. This enabled me to be balanced into the transition and make a lighting fast edge change to the next turn. But then you slow your movements down,gradually arch the skis around you and keeping your balance\body moving through the turn.
Tip & Rip.

What exactly do you mean "moving/projekting" your hips into the transition? Where are your feet in relationship with your hips "in the transition"?
post #21 of 28
Actively moving your CoM into the transition before you get there. The legs are flexed and the feet are under your Hips. The more you use alignment of your weight in a balanced theme of movements the stronger & faster you can make a desired turn shape.
post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 
One thing that might be relevant (or not) is that when I go on steeper slopes I don't ski any particular fall line. I just stay in the turn until I feel the speed is matched for leaning the body the other way. Then I just let go of the skis and actively move the hips down the fall line and into the turn so I can get enough edge angle for the edges to catch me.
This is going on subconciously, so I can't say I'm planning any turns in any other way than looking out for obstacles and other skiers.
I don't think I provide any more forward pressure than the knee flexion gives. I have quite even weight distribution under my feet with a tad more just behind the big toe.

On the gentler slope I'm in more of a rhythm and I think it's easier to work on transitions.

One thing that comes to my mind thinking about pure cross under (and I don't know if I'm making this up or not) is that the combination of having the skis turning already in the latter part of the transition and still having the legs in their semi relaxed state, or maybe weak angle, feels uncomfortable to me. I *think* (at the desk) that I prefer to delay the pressure until I get the legs a little straighter.
Does this make any sense?
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

I agree with TDK's view on your skiing. It is refreshingly dynamic and inventive.

Your CoM (center of mass) resides in your torso. When you are skiing now, your CoM is going up and down as well as side to side. You can't keep your skis on the snow because the CoM is tugging your feet up. The vertical motion of your CoM also makes it much harder to be balanced and harder to effectively control your skis as eventually the CoM comes down and when it does it adds pressure to the skis adding effectiveness to whatever you are already doing. This exagerates the effects of your movements.

Imagine a plane (the geometric kind, not the the flying kind) that exists about hip high above the snow when you are in an athletic stance; the stance you land in when you jump up and land on dry land. When you ski, imagine keeping your hips at or below the plane, particularly in the transition. To do that you will have to flex your legs into an athletic stance in transition. Your legs will flex at transition, extend through the turn and return to flexed at the next transition. The flexion and extension is progressive, not abrupt. Keeping your hips at or below the plane will prevent the CoM from going up and down nearly so much.

Let the energy of the skis transfer your skis arcross the hill rather than move your torso up.
 

I'll try. :)
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Actively moving your CoM into the transition before you get there. The legs are flexed and the feet are under your Hips. The more you use alignment of your weight in a balanced theme of movements the stronger & faster you can make a desired turn shape.

Im very puzzled by your statemets here. CoM is YOU. How can YOU move into the transition before YOU get there?

Also, how can you have feet under your hips while legs are flexed? This is something that comes up quite frequently and I dont understand why people think this is possible when its obviously not. Pulling your feet back under your hips is an extention move. Flexing your legs always moves your hips back. But if we talk about CoM then we have to take our upper body into account as well. By folding it over forwards we shift lots of mass forwards and we can compensate for hips dropping back.
post #25 of 28
By projecting your mass in a desired direction you will be balanced when you actually get there. If you jump towards a certain area don't you look/point/move your body in that direction first? In Skiing you are always moving/pointing your body towards a place you intend to go to. Does that make any sense at all? As for the flex in a transition yes the Hips are behind your feet for a short time but you are moving down an inclined plane @ angles to it's fall line. That creates a Centripetal force that will substain your balance. I don't like to think of folding the upper body or pulling the feet back but instead driving the CoM forward and keeping my Hips  

skeletonly aligned w/ my feet. Your thoughts?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post




Im very puzzled by your statemets here. CoM is YOU. How can YOU move into the transition before YOU get there?

Also, how can you have feet under your hips while legs are flexed? This is something that comes up quite frequently and I dont understand why people think this is possible when its obviously not. Pulling your feet back under your hips is an extention move. Flexing your legs always moves your hips back. But if we talk about CoM then we have to take our upper body into account as well. By folding it over forwards we shift lots of mass forwards and we can compensate for hips dropping back.
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thank you guys for the feedback! :)
Now I have stuff to work with 'til next time.

Cheers!
post #27 of 28
 Hi - also, pull your inside knee back a bit to parallel
post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by csr_jr View Post

 Hi - also, pull your inside knee back a bit to parallel

I can try, but I'm worried that it will make me more vulnerable for unseen bumps by shortening my platform.
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