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Are you how you ski? A ramble...

post #1 of 60
Thread Starter 
Are you a "figure skier," focusing on precision, the finest of tunes, the cleanest tracks in the snow, turn to turn (and PROBABLY somewhat aware of how you might look from the chair)?
Are you more a "bomber," blasting and crashing through, looking for air and the exhilaration of controlled recklessness?
When you're in the chair, are you more apt to soak in the view or wonder what's taking this chair so @#$%ing long to get to the top?
When you fall (IF you fall), is your first thought more likely to be weight back, i should know better or to get up quickly, look around to see if anyone you know saw you?
What stirs you more, someone ripping a cliff, really getting after it, but maybe they let their hands fall back...or someone linking sweet short meticulous turns down a steep?

Rhetorical questions.

Lack of basic technical proficiency will keep anyone from "full" self-expression on skis, but assuming the skills are there, the mountain seems a fine canvas for our respective, personal brushstrokes.

I like to watch people, generally, and no less so on the mountain. Something about skiing - the hazards mixed with the joys - brings out something specific in people, I think. Maybe the odd product that comes from chasing with glee and abandon that thing that might at any time turn around and bite. Thus the shit-eating grin at the same time as wild-eyed fear.

I would think that you long-time instructors have by now witnessed and catalogued for quick reference your own guide to personality types and are probably pretty accurate when it comes to encountering someone, having a face-to-face, and KNOWING how that person is going to ski away from you, as well as how they're going to deal (or not) with "failure" and success. I have no doubt a lot is apparent just watching someone step into their bindings.

Are you excited about Utah, and skiing with other Bears, knowing your skiing will, even under good and honorable intent, be scrutinized, certainly noticed and remembered...or are you nervous about it, with maybe even a half-ounce of dread (which will pass)?

What IS skiing "well." Do you look to that answer from others, based on some quantifiable, visible widget-reference, or do you answer it yourself, based on what you know, what you want from it?

The "either/or" approach is for point-making, of course. The truth is usually more of a blend of skills.
post #2 of 60
Nice soliloquy.

You will know you have achieved mastery as a ski instructor when you can watch someone walk across the parking lot and accurately gauge what level skier they are. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #3 of 60
In my first ever "so you want to be a ski instructor" clinic as a candidate for the Mount Seymour Ski School in 1974 after school, the first thing Wayne Booth said was, "watch these first timers walk to the meeting place...start your D&C now!"
I see everything, sometimes with an eye to MA sometimes with an eye to Guest Service, to Logistic efficiencies of the Resort....I cannot help it...I am a student and product of the industry.
Of course, I spent summers lifeguarding at the beach, and to this day cannot lay down and relax...always scanning the horizon. Pretty scary glimpse into my makeup, eh?
post #4 of 60
I think figure skiing is a great way to put it. I know in my case, I'm all about the technical aspects of this sport. The pursuit, of perfect turns in all conditions.

I'm mindful of technique but not to the point of letting an off day ruin a day of skiing. After all, I'm in the mountains, they're beautiful and they're my home. How could that be a bad day? It never will be.

I love watching smooth skiers. I get excited when I see someone making technically great turns in really challenging situations.

Jumping and all that, really isn't great skiing to me. Like, I watch the Olympics, the bump skiing. Sure, they're ripping. But I'd really like to see rounder turns. I think there's way too much emphasis on jumps and speed and not enough emphasis on skills.

I'm excited about Utah - the skiing, meeting new people, putting faces to text. Nervous? Kinda, but that comes with living in a glass house. It's all really good though.

Skiing well, to me, is skiing the whole mountain with style and grace. Nothing better than watching a smooth skier. My goals, are style and grace. Does mean the rest is wrong? No way! It's just what turns me on.

The mountains, the turns, meeting new people. It's all so wonderful. Thank you, God.

Cheers to all,

[ June 07, 2002, 08:55 AM: Message edited by: SCSA ]
post #5 of 60
Nolo-
Got you beat-. Tell what level they are while just standing in boots! Hell- carrying skis is a dead give away!!! HAHA

And of course- those lost souls just wandering around looking for the rental shop are just TOO easy to pick out!

(EDIT)- Nolo- I was under the impression they were carrying skis across the parking lot, but I just re-read your post. (humbled, bowing, scraping as I back away...)

:

[ June 07, 2002, 08:46 AM: Message edited by: vail snopro ]
post #6 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by nolo:
Nice soliloquy.

You will know you have achieved mastery as a ski instructor when you can watch someone walk across the parking lot and accurately gauge what level skier they are. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
You are not serious are you? I see some overweight, out-of-shape instructors at my local hill and they certainly do not inspire grace, power, balance or athleticism. Yet they ski, and ski well. But when they walk in the parking lot, they are no different than the overweight, out-of-shape individual who cannot ski at all. :
post #7 of 60
Tom,
Are you suggesting I could pass as a ski instructor when in a parking lot?

Woohooo!
PSIA here I come....

S
post #8 of 60
Wow, GREAT thread! Just reading the opening brought back exquisite memories for me. I could post pages, but I'll keep it short.

Skiers that swivel my head, and I DO watch from the chair, have that elusive "it" factor. An commanding blend of both technique and artistry, of both reckless abandonment and poise. It has nothing to do with equipment, clothing, age, or gender. It's just skiing like a rock star.

Don't judge someone in the parking lot. I still carry my skis like a gaper.

I'm really looking forward to reading the posts on this one.
post #9 of 60
I'm a figure skier. At least 97% of the time.
post #10 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by SCSA:


Like, I watch the Olympics, the bump skiing. Sure, they're ripping. But I'd really like to see rounder turns. I think there's way too much emphasis on jumps and speed and not enough emphasis on skills.
you have got to be kidding. mogul skiing, imnsho, is the MOST difficult and creative aspect of skiing. the timing, quickness, coordination, balance and guts it takes to rip a mogul run at the olympic level are just plain phenomenal.

do you honestly believe there's no skill involved in mogul skiing, much less that those skills can't be applied anywhere else on the mountain?! i guarantee that the vast majority of great mogul skiers are equally great all-around skiers.

[ June 07, 2002, 10:47 AM: Message edited by: Adema ]
post #11 of 60
Thread Starter 
i'm not sure scsa was going after the bumpers but i will echo that watching great bumpers is pretty impressive. it just seems so many light-years away from my skills. and at the competitive level, it's just scary-good.
post #12 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by ryan:
i'm not sure scsa was going after the bumpers
maybe you're right. it's just that i love mogul skiing, both watching AND doing.
post #13 of 60
Here's something I thought I'd never say: I go both ways! :

I like to split my time between precision technique based skiing and blowing out carbon, with a little goofing off thrown in for spice. For me, it's all about versatility and FUN. I see too many people stuck in their ruts. They forget that they got so into skiing because it was fun, and it's just turned into some uncompromising pursuit of the perfect turn or the biggest huck. But hey, who am I to say what other people consider fun?
post #14 of 60
Hey you guys, I was kidding. That's what the smilie is supposed to tell you.

However, as in all humor, there is a smidgen of truth there too.

A good skier (Weems' definition) is a good skier in a bathing suit lounging by the pool. I meet some skiers lounging by the pool and I can tell you what kind of skiers they are by how they move. They got the walk: confident, rhythmic, graceful, unselfconscious, animal comfort-and-joy in the movement--that stuff is part of the package that is a signature of a skilled athlete despite the context or activity.

I'm adding a few thoughts about that Powdermag thread that SCSA started, because Ryan opened the door with figure skiing. What's the deal between these two boards? I understand how the Israelis and the Palestinians are fighting over the sliver of desert on the West Bank (well, sort of), but what is the "turf" that the powdermaggots are defending so zealously? Bragging rights? My way or the highway? I just don't get what's at stake...

Because JohnH is 100% correct--what's fun about skiing is that it allows us to express all sides of our personalities. Sometimes I take after Geoff Bruce, sometimes Suzy Chapstick, sometimes a 5 year old kid. There's probably a powdermaggot in there somewhere. I don't get to exercise multiple personalities in normal life. That's the free in skiing.

Maggots dine on rotting flesh. They're kind of the Goths of skiing aren't they?

[ June 07, 2002, 11:44 AM: Message edited by: nolo ]
post #15 of 60
I certainly make forays into the realm of technique, alignment, and equipment. However, my ultimate goal is, without a doubt, to "Feel the Force." From my point of view, all else is there in support of this end.

I have gotten both applauded and blasted in a clinic situation when, having actively participated in deep, heavy technical discussions, I later suggest we need to find the flow. There are definitely those who seem to think that a technical approach is the way to nirvana, my feeling is that it's good for a start but there's a time to move on.

Editorial comment: I have met very few instructors who can easily switch between a technical approach and "find the force." Even fewer who can switch back and forth to produce an optimal learning experience for a particular client. In my book, those who can really do this well get the title of coach (as opposed to instructor).
post #16 of 60
I honestly don’t have any idea how I ski. I have never been video taped and I have seldom asked for or received criticism about my skiing. I believe my style is a cross between an F-14 Tomcat and an A-10 Warthog, big, powerful, fast, aggressive, and nearly indestructible. Age is lessening the Warthog/indestructible aspect, since the injuries now take so much longer to heal. I would love to have the ability to convert to the grace and elegance of a figure skier, but I seem to have missed out on that instructional software during my programming.

Twenty years ago I “hucked big air” just like all the other kids. But how much "big air" can you “huck” before it becomes just more air? Not much. I still huck air but only once in a while now. My current gig is really bad snow. You know, the stuff where there is one set of tracks in 500 acres of snow. Those are my tracks. Deep sun pits, deep wind etched powder, death cookies, asteroid fields; anything bad is a good challenge. Yeah, I still love powder, but when it’s gone, I look for challenge snow. After all there is no bad snow, just snow you can’t ski well.

My falls have traditionally been in two categories, not paying attention, the 5 mph fall, which occurs while attempting to calculate whether a 6.35% mortgage at 2.5 points is better than the 6.5% at o points, thud, oops; or the fast, steep rag doll. These are my wife’s favorite, kind of a life insurance lottery deal. This year I was reintroduced to a fall, which I thought was long in the past, the binding prerelease. My new Solomon’s released in hard snow, moguls and just about everywhere they should not have released. They are now back at Solomon for a “look see.” For those who have forgotten, the binding release fall in the moguls is a treat best left for others, perhaps maggots? At first I thought it was technique, but my markers never prerelease. Now that is counter to popular opinion.

From the chair I either talk with seat mates or watch for someone doing something really well, bumps, carving, short turns, racing, half pipe/park, big air, anything. I never analyze the skills of beginners or intermediates, unless I am pointing something out to a seatmate who is trying to improve. But for the truly gifted, I try and understand what they are doing and whether I can learn something from them. I have much to learn about skiing.

The only reason I watch skiers walking in from the parking lot is to avoid those who I can tell will whack me with a ski or stab me with a ski pole, ha, ha, ha. But it has happened, more than once; live and learn.

“Are you excited about Utah, and skiing with other Bears, knowing your skiing will, even under good and honorable intent, be scrutinized, certainly noticed and remembered...or are you nervous about it, with maybe even a half-ounce of dread (which will pass)?”

Yes. But I never thought about being scrutinized, or being nervous about it. I am the skier I am. I am somewhere on a continuum between the rankest beginner and histories single most talented skier. Even that most talented skier was where I am at some point. Just because someone’s skills are less than mine today does not mean they are inferior; that belief has come back to haunt many people. I know people who now work for former subordinates, for some it is destabilizing, for others it is satisfying to know that someone they mentored has truly excelled. I greatly respect the latter.

Which brings me to a side bar about maggots. While I know many maggots also post here, I don’t like the true, hard corps maggots because I believe some of them are egotistical and cruel to the point where they would steer an unsuspecting intermediate into a dead end double black diamond trap. Leaving the poor kid with a two-hour hike up or down to get out. All for a laugh, because they are a superior skier, smarter, better. But they are none of those things they are just small petty people with little to say, and no legacy. Their mark on the world is like the crater they leave after “hucking big air”, quickly and irreversibly filled by the next snowfall. The EpicSki crowd is different; yes even the double identity posters qualify for the most part. I suspect that the legacy here can be a real and significant change to skiing on a personal and industry wide basis. Lets keep it that way. There is no better legacy.

Adema:

I agree with you. The most all around skilled skiers I have ever skied with are the great bump skiers.

Nolo:

The puffery and one-ups-man-ship of the maggots usually means insecurity, fear of failure, or just testosterone talk. Some of the guys over there will be exactly what they advertise; most will be a pale version of their puffery. For every claim of “hucking” 80’ you will see 50 “hucks” of 20’. Considering the gear they have to ski on today, they all would have to be skiing to the limit of their bragging rights to impress me. We did what they are doing 25 years ago on much inferior equipment, and Stein and company did the same 25 years before that on unfathomably crude equipment. Who do you think I respect? Stein and his generation – full on, my generation somewhat, but the new guys much less, they are just doing the same old thing a little bit better on vastly superior equipment. It seems to me they should be humble, learn from the true masters, ride with dignity, leave a full legacy, and have fun. But that is way too much to ask from many of the flaccid little carrion eaters.

If this generates some sort of interforum, bandwidth eating flame war, I will be very disheartened. I frankly would like to ski with some of the more reasonable and skilled maggots, but not the trolls.
post #17 of 60
[quote]Originally posted by ryan:
[QB]"Are you a "figure skier," focusing on precision, the finest of tunes, the cleanest tracks in the snow, turn to turn (and PROBABLY somewhat aware of how you might look from the chair)? Are you more a "bomber," blasting and crashing through, looking for air and the exhilaration of controlled recklessness?"

I'm wondering what it says about my personality given that the skiing I seem to like best involves the junkiest snow out there. I seem to gravitate to the chopped-up, half-frozen, how-come-nobody's-skiing-over-HERE? kind of stuff. It's certainly not I've mastered all the "normal" conditions 'cuz God knows that's not the case. I just like weird snow. Does that mean I'm strange?

"When you're in the chair, are you more apt to soak in the view or wonder what's taking this chair so @#$%ing long to get to the top?
When you fall (IF you fall), is your first thought more likely to be weight back, i should know better or to get up quickly, look around to see if anyone you know saw you?"

Neither. Looking for the most interesting place to make the next run.

"What stirs you more, someone ripping a cliff, really getting after it, but maybe they let their hands fall back...or someone linking sweet short meticulous turns down a steep?"

Yes.

Or a two-year-old with a huge grin on her face just learing to pizza-and-french-fries.

"I would think that you long-time instructors have by now witnessed and catalogued for quick reference your own guide to personality types and are probably pretty accurate when it comes to encountering someone, having a face-to-face, and KNOWING how that person is going to ski away from you, as well as how they're going to deal (or not) with "failure" and success. I have no doubt a lot is apparent just watching someone step into their bindings."

When I was a guide, I was often misled by appearances. I learned from experience that I couldn't *really* tell how good a skier was until I'd seen them make ten turns on Rendezvous Bowl.

"Are you excited about Utah, and skiing with other Bears,"

YES!

"knowing your skiing will, even under good and honorable intent, be scrutinized, certainly noticed and remembered..."

Uh huh.

"or are you nervous about it,"

A bit, but then I know perfectly well that there's lots and lots of better skiers around.

"with maybe even a half-ounce of dread (which will pass)?"

No dread. These people all seem too nice. They'll watch me, smirk into their neck gaiters, and then politely make suggestions on how to cure all my ills.

"What IS skiing "well." Do you look to that answer from others, based on some quantifiable, visible widget-reference, or do you answer it yourself, based on what you know, what you want from it?"

I think that changes with age. I'll admit that years ago I counted on others to tell me if I was skiing well. Eventually, I could tell for myself when I was skiing well (and when I'm not). Now, even if others may say I'm skiing well, I know it could be better.

Bob
post #18 of 60
I'd like to make a few of observations about what I'm reading.

1) Firstly, I don't know the history of this site vs. the powdermag site, but after reading a few of the posts on the thread SCSA started over there, I have to agree that there is more ego than ability. Those that have to talk about it, usually can't do it!

Leading me to a second point.

MD'59 is talking about how different generations of skiers have been doing the same things , on various types of equipment. I agree with you MD-.

During the 70's and early 80's, I was competeing on the various freestyle tours, and my friends and I would "huck" (new word) ourselves off any thing we thought that we could survive. The biggest difference today, is that the $$$ are bigger. In my group, we'd jump just about anything for the price of a six-pack, and a copy of the photo! Now, look at the group which "will jump for $$$". Offer me that money, pay my expenses to get me there, and I'd still probably do much of what we see in the current crop of ski films. (I hope Vail won't discontinue my health insurance!!!) Are they really any better than past generations? Not really.

Give me Stein, or Tom Leroi throwing a beautiful back layout, or Eddie Lincoln throwing the first Moebius(full-full) anytime. Totally artistic! Complete grace! Does Jeremy Nobis look awesome, sailing over rock ledges in the Chugach? Sure, but it's been done already! Just not in the exotic locations which are used as backdrop scenery now.

Another point brought up by Adema.
I will not argue that the current crop of WC bumpers are fantastic athletes. Fast, balanced, great air, etc. And with it's own special types of grace. I'm a little jealous of their youth!

But as an ex-pro bumper and turn judge on the now extinct pro-mogul tour, I really miss the grace of a carved, round turn in the bumps. Quite a few of the local "hot" bumpers in Vail wouldn't know an edge if it cut them! And at the WC level, with speed being so important, turn shape no longer exists!

Watch slow-mo footage of a current WC bumper. Do you see anything but heel push / displacement? An incidental edge, merely deflecting off the top of the next bump? Again, wonderful to watch, but very unrealistic for the average skier to emulate! But don't insult me by calling what they do "carved turns".

Take the clock away from bump skiing at the competitive level, and watch real quality turns re-emerge!

With the full intent of participating at the BB Academy next season, I'm going to offer a special session on bump skiing for the average skier. Want to learn to ski the fall line in 1 day? I can show you how. It isn't hard!

Uh-oh-. I'm starting to sound like HH, and soon SCSA will be singing my praises... I had better quit now....

:

[ June 07, 2002, 06:47 PM: Message edited by: vail snopro ]
post #19 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by vail snopro:

Another point brought up by Adema.

Watch slow-mo footage of a current WC bumper. Do you see anything but heel push / displacement? An incidental edge, merely deflecting off the top of the next bump? Again, wonderful to watch, but very unrealistic for the average skier to emulate! But don't insult me by calling what they do "carved turns".

Take the clock away from bump skiing at the competitive level, and watch real quality turns re-emerge!

admittedly, modern competitive bump skiing has only a passing interest in carved turns per se. but to imply that a good bump skier is not keenly aware of his edges is just wrong. i doubt if even a great ski racer, let alone any recreational skier, has the "feel" for the snow that's required to be competitive in the bumps. having a good feel for the snow requires a good feel for your skis, including the edges. set an edge at the wrong time in the bumps and you're pretty much done.

again, the point of my post above was simply that a great bump skier is usually a great all-around skier. a truly great bump skier has tremendous control, balance, power, agility, timing, etc., all of which make for a great all-mountian skier.

i don't know about those local mogul guys to whom you referred, but every great bump skier i've known can rip a groomed run a new one, if he's so inclined.

[ June 07, 2002, 08:00 PM: Message edited by: Adema ]
post #20 of 60
Wrong! Sorry Adema...but I am with VSP! In the late 70's early 80's GREAT bumpers like Stu O'Brian and Robbie Huntoon had evolved carved falline "carving" from their predecessors Wong, Fergie, Salerno, Jumpin'Jack! Then the rules changed...FIS came in to "save" freestyle and guys like Nanu Portier et al started the heel push-no air between the knees-speed control through friction excuse for bumping that we see today.
I was one of those kids with a Midas "Muffler" on too, VSP! We cut our own bumps and aired the "endo lines" where the zipper ran into a "garage door". Now, they even throw in a "safe land" zone after airs, before the zipper restarts! (A friend of mine was the SLC freestyle designer in DV (Jeff C.), we giggled about the egg carton bumps and fluffed landings...now, there was a guy who could....but I digress from my hopefully not to offensive rant!)
They are rarely doing anything that could be remotely construed as modern carving! They are pure flex and extend pivoting. Of course if they used a complete range of motion their itty-bitty poles would be useless. I have rarely seen any modern bumpers "carving the groomers"
They are exciting, talented, one-dimensional skiers and exquisite aerial acrobats and gymnastics with incredible fast twitch....but carve...SORRY!

[ June 07, 2002, 08:49 PM: Message edited by: Robin ]
post #21 of 60
A voice in the back seat once said, "you drive like you ski".

I find a long winding mountain road with a few corrugations and the odd unpredictable kangaroo keeps my soul quietly smiling.

Feeling not thinking…...

Oz [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #22 of 60
Oz,
I can relate to that.
I have a bigger car than I need.
It is stylish (in my opinion)
It has all the latest gadgets in it, most of which I don't use (or haven't worked out how to!)
It has a top speed way faster than I'll probably ever go.
It wasn't the cheapest car that would have fulfilled my needs.
I'll probably change it in a couple of years, and lose a small fortune in the process.

The only differences between me on my Axis X Pros, and me in my Laguna, is that the Laguna has stability & brake assistance programs (which can be switched off), whereas, when I ski, I could do with assistance for stability & braking.

S
post #23 of 60
What the heck is a Laguna? Just a little humor. I realize cars have different names across the pond.

Great post folks. No one has mentioned something that I find of interest. The shape of bumps. I am amazed by the way moguls are shaped these days and the impact it has had on my skiing. The obvious cause for the change involves snowboards. I also thinf that shorter skis are making a difference on steep terrain.
post #24 of 60
Yes I have skied bumps with Carl...this year though he has had that nasty back thing. And yes, the technique they use in the bumps has evolved to it's most effective and efficient form...but it is manufactured just like the terrain!
I believe the Rotary skill to be the most misunderstood, misinterpreted and underappreciated skill....after balance it is the master skill. I know when to pivot, how steer etc....I am merely saying, (and I believe I have the eye to say so) that on the edge/pressure-rotary continuum....it's pretty left of "centerline"....can I say such things now?! The skis barely deviate from the falline and turn shape, if any is a result of deflection and terrain more than intent...
Actually, I am just pissed I can't run the "hammerline" anymore and hope to have my vertabrae stack up again.
post #25 of 60
I don't know about that, Robin. During the last few seasons I have had the opportunity to watch tons of bumper types freeski. Guys like Moseley, Dorian, Cussan, Szocs, etc... can all carve turns all over the hill. These guys all competed on the WC, and they are all great all-around skiers. Yeah, they get most of their publicity from air, but these guys F**kin' rip everywhere. Yes, the dominant turn in bumps is flat and pivoty, but there is more carving going on than meets the eye. This is one reason skis like the Rossi Mogul have quite a bit of shape. I belive Moseley spent several days the summer before Nagano doing nothing but skiing in a wedge, working on carving.
You talk about safe/fluffed landings. Have you checked out the size of those kickers? They had better have a landing zone besides the rutline. Yeah, natural bumps are more "free" but the built-in kickers allow some truly amazing airs.
Are moguls the "final word" in skiing? I guess it depends on whom you talk to. Every great skier can rock the bumps. Moguls, like racing, is a great background for all mountain expert skiing. I remember living in Santa Barbara, Ca, and driving to Big Bear every weekend. I would lap the "Wall" (Snow Summit's bump run) all day. Why? It was the most challenging skiing available. With man made snow, there was no off-piste, but there were bumps. Not every hill has cliffs/chutes/cornices/etc, but most have moguls, and the people who ski them are going to improve more there than on the groomers. Bumps and my determination to ski them well gave me the skills to pass my Level III my third season teaching, on the first try.
These days, the carved turn is pretty much a gimme for anyone on a 170 Rossi Cut rental. There is a whole new kind of intermediate. This skier can carve the heck out of the groomed, but has no idea how to flatten and pivot their skis. They are totally lost in bumps, crud, and real steeps. Is carving the "final word" in skiing? After watching Swiss full certs on 150s hack down Mammoth's steeps, I would say "no". Good skiers are above all else versatile. Sure, they can carve; but they can also pivot. Have you been on a bump clinic with D Teamer Carl Underkoffler? If you have, then the chances are you spent some time working on a flat ski turn. Why? It is very effective. I wonder if he can carve a turn?
We skied together at last year's Ed Core session at Mammoth, and I know you know when to carve, and when to pivot. Skiing short turns in bumpy crud up top, you used lots of flat pivoty turn initiations, as did I. These turns were very similar to what bumpers do. Not surprising considering the terrain and snow. Did our skiing change on the groomed? Of course it did, and so does the skiing of bumpers.
post #26 of 60
VSP's thing touched a nerve in me, too. I often see - mostly young men - these bump/freetylers going down a normal, bumpless hill. You know they are a bump/freestyler because of the way they move. They move their legs almost as one unit, with a lot of hip swivel and heel-pushing. They seem to use a combination of guts, balance and strength to make it work. I sometimes wonder what happens to them as they get older, do they get lessons and change their style, or give up because it's not fun any more?
post #27 of 60
Adema,

I skied with Jeremy Bloom. We rode up on the chair and he introduced himself. Then he invited me to take a run with him. I did and followed behind him. He's all about twisting his skis to turn.

Are the Olympic bump skiers great skiers? Maybe at what they do, but technically, as defined by the turns we talk about here, no. Not in my opinion anyway.

Cheers,
post #28 of 60
Adema,
You make an observation that maybe WC racers couldn't do as well in the bumps as a full time bumper. I'm not sure I agree with that!

Before Jonny M and Bode M left K2, we used to get together every spring at a major resort for what was called the K2 Pro-Staff Games. It gave a lot of retailers the opportunity to ski with the top athletes sponsored by K2.

I had the pleasure of spending quite a bit of time with both of them, together! We ripped around Vail for almost 4 hrs one day, and regardless of the conditions, Bode outskied Jonny, hands down. Faster, stronger, and more technically. And we skied it all! P,P,L,H, back bowls, frontside, Nastar, the terrain parks, the half pipes, you name it!
Don't get me wrong-. Jonny is an awesome skier and a pretty good guy, but not a match for a top WC racer.

"It's easier for a civilized man to act as a barbarian, than it is for a barbarian to act civilized". Capt. J.T. Kirk to Mr. Spock



:
post #29 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by man from oz:
I find a long winding mountain road with a few corrugations and the odd unpredictable kangaroo keeps my soul quietly smiling.
For years there's been a core contingent of us in our club at Guthega who go up every weekend, ski like hell, do Masters, and leave on Sunday night. The road is pretty windey, and a few of us noticed that quite often, we were driving as we'd been skiing a few hours before! Taking similar lines and rhythms, mentally moving as when skiing.
post #30 of 60
vail pro - are you telling us Bode outskied Moseley in the park and pipe?
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