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Edge and wax from ski shop

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
      I wonder how ski shop ( general one like Rei, sportsbasement) do their edge ? would it do more harm than good to my ski, when I ask them what bevel angle they do, the answer is " standard" and can not really tell me the degree.
      I do have simple tuning tool from slideright, but feel I should invested in a better edge tool.
post #2 of 10
Quote:
when I ask them what bevel angle they do, the answer is " standard" and can not really tell me the degree

That would certainly worry me. It may be the guy you're talking to at the counter isn't the guy who operates the machine ... if he is, and he doesn't know what he's setting it to, he may do more harm than good.

If he's not the guy who actually does the tuning, you could hopefully assume that guy who does do it is a little more clued in, I guess I'd still be worried. Possible courses of action:
- Make the guy at the desk write the bevels you want clearly IN BIG BOLD WRITING on the order tag; write them yourself on tape and attach it to the ski; etc.
- Only work on the edges yourself.
- Take the skis to a shop where the guy you talk to sounds like he knows what he, and his cohorts, are doing.
post #3 of 10
Either find a good shop where you know its not done by some drunken idiot or learn to do it yourselve. Have had to many skis f-up by a ski shop to trust them with my gear. Try to find some amateur racers in your neighboorhood and ask where they are going or ask them to do it for double the ski shop price. 

How far you want to go with your own wax/edge kit is up to you and your skis. El cheapo you should be able to start on them around usd 100 (some shops have starter kits). If you are serious or want more exotic tuning/waxing well then there is no limit.
Will you save money? Not on waxing/edging but definitely in buying skis because the skishop ruined them.
Will you save time? Bringing and getting my skis back costs me 2hrs and a week in between and diy 2-3hrs in a lazy afternoon.
post #4 of 10
Some shops have a "standard" configuration that meets the requirements of a large portion of their customers.  This lets them tune larger batches of skis without resetting their machinery. 

A shop that doesn't know or won't tell what their settings are doesn't inspire a lot of confidence in their results.

Try to find a shop that deals with racers.  These shops will be used to dealing with different settings. 
post #5 of 10
The shops the OP is talking about are REI, and some place called the 'Sports Basement'... I'll give you two guesses how this will turn out, the first guess doesn't count.

95% of the skiers out there could never tell the difference between a ski with a .7* base and a 2* side and a ski with a 1* base and a 3* side but 100% will wonder what the f*ck happened if there is a hanging burr left on the edge after a tune. I'd suggest: 1) don't get too concerned with edge angles, a well executed tune is much more important. 2) take your skis to a ski shop that has a clue and can accomplish #1... I'm betting the Sports Basement ain't it. 
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

The shops the OP is talking about are REI, and some place called the 'Sports Basement'... I'll give you two guesses how this will turn out, the first guess doesn't count.

95% of the skiers out there could never tell the difference between a ski with a .7* base and a 2* side and a ski with a 1* base and a 3* side but 100% will wonder what the f*ck happened if there is a hanging burr left on the edge after a tune. I'd suggest: 1) don't get too concerned with edge angles, a well executed tune is much more important. 2) take your skis to a ski shop that has a clue and can accomplish #1... I'm betting the Sports Basement ain't it. 

the Sports Basement in San Francisco is very very good at what they do. i used to take my skis to them before i got a job at a ski shop that was closer.

when edging skis, i always to the side edge first so any burrs that are left on the skis are taken off on the base edge grind.
post #7 of 10
 Funny, I was going to post and ask what the factory side/base bevel was on the Kastle FX84.  Guess I'm probably not good enough to know the difference so I should just throw any tune on it and be happy.
post #8 of 10
Why be concerned about the factory bevel?  Get the skis tuned to the shape that best suits your skiing style and the type of snow you use those skis on.

I like my carving skis with 3° side edge bevel and .75° bottom edge bevel feathered to 1° near the tips & tails.  Of course, sharp all the way from the front curve to the rear curve.

I like my powder skis with 2° side edge bevel and 1° bottom edge bevel.  I have no idea, nor no interest, what bevels the factory claimed they had when they were manufactured.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

Why be concerned about the factory bevel? 
 

Nice to know where you're starting from, so you have an idea about how much work you have to do to get your preferred configuration.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

The shops the OP is talking about are REI, and some place called the 'Sports Basement'... I'll give you two guesses how this will turn out, the first guess doesn't count.

95% of the skiers out there could never tell the difference between a ski with a .7* base and a 2* side and a ski with a 1* base and a 3* side but 100% will wonder what the f*ck happened if there is a hanging burr left on the edge after a tune. I'd suggest: 1) don't get too concerned with edge angles, a well executed tune is much more important. 2) take your skis to a ski shop that has a clue and can accomplish #1... I'm betting the Sports Basement ain't it. 

Probably True.   However, I would bet 85 % of the skiers I know and have skied with (some Bears too) would know when "that ski is just not running/turning right - something is amiss.  Whether it is  .7 base and 3 edge  vs. 1 base and 2 edge may not always be the point.  Can I tell something is wrong - absolutely - could be concave, convex, wrong angles, changing degrees or may be more simply put just a bad tune, stone grind etc.  Different tunes work for different skiers and it is usually important if that particular skier knows why a ski is working for him/her.   Personally I would care less about carving on groomers, don't race anymore; so run 1 and 2 on everything-works for me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 Funny, I was going to post and ask what the factory side/base bevel was on the Kastle FX84.  Guess I'm probably not good enough to know the difference so I should just throw any tune on it and be happy.

You are definitely good enough to FEEL the difference.   Point MADE.
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