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which ski has superb carving performance, perfect ice hold, and wider turn radius??

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
hello,
i am 6'1" 210 pounds and in pretty good shape. (former hockey player)
most of the times i ski medium to long turns on hard pack snow or even on artificial snow.

at the moment i am skiing on a völkl racetiger worldcup sl in 165, which by the way is a really cool ski for my carving preferences, even though sometimes the radius could be a bit higher.

now i am looking for a ski which has superb carving performance, holds perfect on ice and has a wider turn radius (around 18m).
also i prefer skis that you feel on your legs and that you have to ski active.

my problem is that i would like a ski which i can use when there is a bit softer snow as in march and april or when there is new snow and the slope is not in perfect condition. i guess i have to get some wider skis.

i would be really happy if someone could give me any recommendation. is there any ski, that would fulfill my requirements or does this ski not exist and i have to get two skis. (if so, which two skis.)

i tested the nordica hot rod top fuel which i really liked. but this was a couple of years ago. so i am looking in that kind of direction.

i also tested the rossignol radical r9x which i think is not a great gs cheater ski but if you ski them in softer snow whith 80mm wide it was pretty cool. now i don't have any comparison to other skis.

thanks for any feedback and br,
marc


i used to ski on atomic betaride 10.20...my first carver and a great all time ski.
then on head xrc 1100 worldcup which i did not like that much.
then i bought the fischer rx fire which in my opinion was one of the best carving skis (the real rx fire). it had the same construction then the fischer rc4 sc worldcup but with smaller radius.
and now i have the völkl racetiger wc sl.

additional i own a rossignol b2 in 190cm which i sometimes use in bumps and between trees.
post #2 of 24
Well the good news is that there are a number of wider skis available today that work better in the crud and softer snow while still retaining the ability to rail GS turns down the hardpack.  I think something in the upper 70's to low 80's would work for ya.  Some really solid options are

  • The aforementioned Nordica Hot Rod series (Ignitor or Jet Fuel)
  • Volkl AC-50
  • Blizzard Magnum 8.1

Nothing's going to hold like your Racetigers, but these are all pretty burly skis and can hold an edge in the hardpack while giving you a bit more float in crud and softer snow.
post #3 of 24
Atomic D2 VF82 - Superman ski. Great edge hold, silky & great top end, but can still sleep on them if you like. Can be a bit planky in the bumps, but still softer than an SL.
post #4 of 24
Elan 82xti
post #5 of 24
"Perfect" ice performance and wider skis don't mix.

If you want superb ice performance, you want a full-on race ski.  The Head World Cup iSpeed would be one choice in the 18m turn radius category.

Just just my opinion, of course.
post #6 of 24

what's your budget for said perfect ski.

post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
thanks for all the replies.

i am from austria, you can get skis for pretty fair prices so budget does not really matter. i want a ski with sandwich (wooid) construction though. (so most of the atomic line is not in scope).

the best solution would probably be to buy two pair of skis, which i might go for.
then i would look for the head worldcup i speed as bob peters suggested. i would also look on fischer rc4 worldcup rc or the nordica doberman gs pro.

has anybody experienced the rossignol r9x wc os. i kind of liked the wider waist, but since i have not been on a good gs skis for very long i have no idea how good it would compare to them.

on the other side, my wider ski which i will try to test:
elan 82xti (according to some reviews here this might be the ski i am looking for)
nordica hot rod ti series
head monster im82
völkl ac50
blizzard magnum 8.1

i guess i wont be able to test all of them, so any feedback to the mentioned skis would be cool.

should i also look on skis with around 78mm waist?

br,
marc
post #8 of 24
Why do people keep listing all mt. skis for carving skis. There are some great carvers out there.
Fischer Progressor+ 9, Fischer Worldcup RC Pro ,Volkl Racetiger GS Racing Titanium , Volkl Racetiger RC Titanium , Atomic Race D2 GS , Blizzard GSR Magnesium , Nordica GS Pro Xbi , Kastle MX 70 to name a few.
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by backroom View Post

Why do people keep listing all mt. skis for carving skis...

Well, because the OP says:

Quote:
Originally Posted by marcaurel_121 View Post

...at the moment i am skiing on a völkl racetiger worldcup sl in 165, which by the way is a really cool ski for my carving preferences, even though sometimes the radius could be a bit higher...

...my problem is that i would like a ski which i can use when there is a bit softer snow as in march and april or when there is new snow and the slope is not in perfect condition. i guess i have to get some wider skis...

...i tested the nordica hot rod top fuel which i really liked. but this was a couple of years ago. so i am looking in that kind of direction...
post #10 of 24
Consider this off choice:

The Hart Phoenix (with plate based binding like the vist) in a 180cm

One of the best ripping skis I've ever been on-wider range of use then most would think.

Liam
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
i agree with backroom that some of the sl and gs skis are best for carving especially if the slopes are in perfect condition.

but sometimes the slopes aren't and this happens this winter here in austria quite offen. when i tried skiing on wider skis the performance was pretty cool as my legs kind of don't get caught in the snow all the time. also the snow slows you down a lot so i want a wider turn radius.

that is why i came up with the idea of buying some wider ski. but since there are quite a bunch of them, i wanted to know which one of them have great edge hold and great carving performance.
post #12 of 24
Any racing GS ski should give you longer radius and ice hold.  Soft-snow performance?  Not so much.  You need a different ski for soft and hard snow.  You ALSO need a LR radius ski for long radius turns and high speeds,  which won't work as well as a SR ski when you are going slowly or making short turns.  Unless you want to compromise, you need 4 skis.  If you don't see too much soft snow, I would get a SL and GS ski for the hard snow and a softer wider long radius ski for the softer snow.

I second the Head i. speed as a good "around 18 m"  hard snow ski.
post #13 of 24
Stockli Stormrider XL

this ski has great rebound, but doesn't toss you at the end of a carved turn like a race ski. for a race ski you really would be honing some special skills. JMO

noticed your turn radius requirement: this years line up is different that what I'm totally familiar with, but look for the Stormrider model with around 30mm difference between waist and tip rather than 42mm; a couple years ago that was the Stormrider Scott Schmidt.
post #14 of 24
If you are from Austria and want wood core, check out the offerings from Stockli and, of course Volkl, HEAD and Nordica.  Stoekli's (Swiss) Laser series includes world class race skis (the FIS models are identical to what is used on the World Cup) and their Stormrider series, some of which are GS-type boards with differing side-cuts.  Some of the Stormriders will likely meet your needs (like the XXL).  The FIS Laser models are likely to be too stiff for anything but racing (I own a pair), and the regular GS skis will be too skinny for all mountain use.  Demo the Stormriders.  They are wood core with straight sidewalls, sintered bases, etc.  Lay them on edge and they will carve.
post #15 of 24
would a person from Austria get good prices on a ski made in Switzerland? just wondering.
post #16 of 24

Good question since the Swiss are not part of the EU. 

post #17 of 24
Just weighing in on the Stocki Stormrider XL. Not familiar with the current lineup. I tried a pair of the XL's a number of years ago, the model with the red, white and blue "flames" graphics. That ski has a wood core, and I think three layers of metal. I bought a pair. Then bought a second pair of the next generation, with a bit softer core, and one less layer of metal. I ski them in a 184cm, they are 116/75/102 with a 20m radius. Prior to this, I had never skied a thing on firm snow, or groomed, other than race skis. I did have powder skis, and still do.

I ski the Stockli's 90% of the time, and I just bought another leftover pair, as I love this particular ski. I think they're about as good an allround ski for me as there is. I'm in New England, and normally ski a mountain that has a lot of wide open steep cruisers. They're almost as solid on the real hard as a GS ski, not quite but close. They are great on a groomed surface. Pretty decent in a bit of crud. Not so great in any deep fresh....but a lot better than a GS ski. They are a touch more forgiving than a real race ski, but they still reward a good balanced stance and they want you to to be on top of things. They'll lock into the 20m shape, and they will easily skid in a smaller shape. Can't comment on bumps, as I hate bumps unless they are real soft. I can muscle them around just fine in the trees. I have a few pairs of GS and SL skis, but most days I ski the Stormriders. I'm 230 lbs., by the way.

Always been impressed with the quality and the fit and finish on the skis. I ski them with a VIST 10mm lifter {not a plate....the separate lifter/spacers} and Salomon 916's. For me they really work in a variety of terrain and snow surfaces. Any ski is a compromise of sorts, and normally is designed for a specific purpose. These have proven to be pretty versatile for me.
 
post #18 of 24
I would concur with muleskis observations about XLs. Like a GS ski but much more versatile is the way I always think of them. A great ski for the east and one that works surprisingly well in softer snow. It has appeal to those of us who remember the days when there were fewer categories of skis.
post #19 of 24
I have to agree with you guys about Stockli's Stormriders, although I have a slightly different take on them.  Most of their skis aren't really good for slip/sliding turns.  They seem to be made for laying them on edge and carving them through just about anything.  I guess it is kinda like skiing in the Alps, where you can have everything from ice to crust to wide swept snow all in one long run.  They will carve through it all .  There are exceptions.  The TT is the easiert powder ski I've ever demoed.  I could ski slowly through the trees with it, which is what I have to do when skiing with my little kids (they have their own powder skis).  They were also OK skiing with speed and actually held an edge on the frontside.  I did not like the Rotor even though a lot of people raved about it.  It arced great but you couldn't change the natural radius of the ski without a ton of work (I guess "Rotor" means steering and not carving).  Regardless, I've owned some Stocklis throughout the years and they are consistently well made.
post #20 of 24
the XL is hard to slip due to the 42mm sidecut waist to tip, the tip and tail want to hook up. the Scott Schmidt of a couple years ago has less side cut, therefore slide better when pushed laterally.
post #21 of 24

Maybe I should have said the XL's are "adequate" at sliding a smaller turn. They want to carve in that 20m radius, maybe a touch a smaller, or larger. The ski is clearly made to carve, and I agree that it's very much like a wide waisted GS, with a wider tip. My point is that if I find myself in terrain where I need to make {slide} some small turns, it's quite doable. I agree...slipping is not a forte, at all. The softer the snow, the less it is. But it's not like I'm saying to myself, "WTF do I have these under my feet for?" when I do need to make some short turns, though. They sure as hell don't turn like my Nordica and Elan SL's, skis built for an entirely different purpose. The XL's will carve and be rock solid on a lot of different surfaces. For me, in New England, great ski. Keep in mind that most of what I ski is "firm". And, almost all of my skiing before these was on race skis {a lot still is}....other than a variety of powder skis. Keep reaching for my XL's.

 

My opinion is that for the right skier, this general design of ski....regardless of the company....seems to be a multi-tasker. Nordica, Fisher, etc.  Not a cheater GS, but a streched out model with race construction and lay-up. Just my $.02. I agree on demoing or borrowing. Get on them before you buy. I'm also guessing that it might be tough for an Austrian to be sporting a Swiss ski in the homeland!

 

post #22 of 24
I agree Mule, that the Stormrider XL can perform well any kind of carving OR sliding turn, especially on firm snow, but also on wind buff or chalk or skier packed powder. Any stiff ski can take you for a ride if you f-it-up.
post #23 of 24
True dat. I don't want to sound like a jerk by stating that it's a ski for somebody who knows how to ski it, with good balance a good stance, and good tehnique...but that's the case. I don't think that ski's in their lineup anymore, either. By the way, I have skied the first generation in a 194, and it's not so versatile.....GS ski with a fatter waist. Pretty much wanted to just carve at screaming speed, big turns. BTW, older SS is a great ski.
post #24 of 24
fire away on the good skiers only ski, elitist slant. this place is full of beginner level skiers aking stupid questions today. what a bore!
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › which ski has superb carving performance, perfect ice hold, and wider turn radius??