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Bottled Oxygen Question

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Are the small portable cans of oxygen practical? I'm referring to the small "aerosol cans" with oxygen in them. When I skied Snowbird last year I did suffer from the high altitude.  Digging myself out of the deep powder was exhausting. Anybody with any experience or recommendations with the various portable oxygen bottles? Thanks. (Negative comments will provide comic relief for me and will be expected)
post #2 of 18
I saw a guy at Alta last year with one of those plastic tubes under his nose, but I didn't see what kind of bottle he had. 
I'll be shopping for one of those soon.

BK
post #3 of 18
Air brush propellant cans FAR cheaper and contain Air, so 20.9% O2 which is all you need
post #4 of 18
I'd be very cautious about breathing anything not meant for human intake - assorted aerosol cans or welding oxygen etc. can contain harmful contaminants. This site http://www.princeton.edu/~oa/safety/altitude.html has some good general advice for altitude, hydration and acclimatization would be more important than oxygen at altitudes seen at ski resorts.
post #5 of 18
Oxygen is a great way to pass out from hyperventilation.  I would recommend trying other things before resorting to carrying oxygen because of the risks.
post #6 of 18

I would suggest increasing your fitness. It's amazing how that helps.

post #7 of 18
I'm with with lungdoc ,,( a VERY appropriate name for this thread btw. )

Digging yourself out of deep powder is always work ,even more so when your skiing partner is laughing his/her ass off at you !
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post

I saw a guy at Alta last year with one of those plastic tubes under his nose, but I didn't see what kind of bottle he had. 
I'll be shopping for one of those soon.

BK
 

Was his name Frank Booth?
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by madmole View Post

Air brush propellant cans FAR cheaper and contain Air, so 20.9% O2 which is all you need

That is one of the dumber things I've read on the internet.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post




That is one of the dumber things I've read on the internet.
I could say that about this thread in general. If your "suffering" from altitude at a place that tops out at 11k feet then that is a sign of poor fitness. Doing a little excercise before your annual ski trip is always a good idea.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post



I could say that about this thread in general. If your "suffering" from altitude at a place that tops out at 11k feet then that is a sign of poor fitness. Doing a little excercise before your annual ski trip is always a good idea.

 

Thats a pretty broad brush you are painting with. Healthy athletes will suffer a lack of performance at elevation.

Altitude sickness goes beyond just a person's fitness level. It is a physical reaction to a change in physical surroundings. Some can just handle it better than others.
post #12 of 18
You know how football players, especially visiting Denver, sit on the side and take oxygen? Maybe the OP is in reference to that type of therapy. I could imagine an old guy, say 75 years old, skiing deep snow, having a tank at the bottom of the lift for a little recovery therapy. If it was that or not ski, I'd give it a shot. Some people lose a lot of cardio fitness with age, no matter what they do. I didn't catch the age of the guy posting the question.

Does this make any sense?
post #13 of 18
I remember something in Stein Eriksen's book about coming out to live and train in Colorado in the 50's to get in shape at altitude for either the Worlds or the Olympics.
post #14 of 18
Cyclists focus on aerobic fitness and sellect a training base for that benefit some times.
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Pretty good info. I'm nervous about using the bottle O2 after reading the comments, so I started daily 1 hr peddling sessions on the Schwinn Airdyne. I've about 40 days before I go so I think it will help. Even if it doesn't help, it's better to be in Utah skiing breathless, than not skiing in Utah. Thanks
post #16 of 18
I've used canned oxygen a bunch of times, I don't use it to get acclimated, haven't had a problem with that. Mainly use it when I need to hike up at high altitudes to get the fresh stuff. Works great for that, my lungs just can't handle the altitude like the guys that live out there. But it would work great for doing anything up there where you get winded.
 
 
 
post #17 of 18
Westcat
Where do you get canned oxygen?

BK
post #18 of 18
I've bought it on ebay in the past, a guy used to sell Sansomania, it's a Korean brand, small bottle with a lot of oxygen. I don't see it on there anymore though. I tried a couple others that were larger, worked ok, but not as good as the Korean stuff.
 
 
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