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any help on information about yamaha downhill skis?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
i thought i was in the know when it comes to skiing after being involved for over 30 years, but when i ran across a pair of yamaha downhill skis in a second hand store i was floored. i'm 39 years old and have been snowboarding for most my life and skiing for about 25. i currently ride the 2009 fischer rc4 worldcup rc in a 180cm and a never summer premier snowboard in a 168cm. just wanted to clarify i wasn't riding old second had gear. i used to race motocross and my weapon of choice was the yamaha along with snowmobiling. so when i saw the yamaha skis i had to have them. they were dirty but in mint shape. they are a yamaha racer in a 180cm with cubco bindings. i paid $2.50. over the past 2 years i have only been able to come across 4 more sets. i have a yamaha hi-flex in a 185cm with cubco bindings, a set of all-round 1 180cm with rosemount lotorks, 1 set of all-round 2 with old salomon bindings and 1 set of all-round 3 with spademan bindings. i have less then $10.00 dollars into this collection and can't seem to find any info anywhere on these skis. they seem to not exist on the net. my collection is in good to mint shape. not interested in selling, just wonder where i can find info on these and what they are worth for insurance purposes. great to look at and hope to be a good conversation piece some day. on display inside the house. thanks in advance for the help. only info on the net i can find is the occasional pair for sale on craigslist. thanks again.
post #2 of 22

Chris,

About 15 years ago I lived in Stowe, VT and my good friend (and landlord) was Bob Quinn. For many years he was the North America Sales VP for Yamaha Skis (I think during the 1970s and early 80's). Some of Bob's kids and grandkids still live in the Stowe / Waterbury area. I am certain that you can track one of them down and maybe get some information from them. If not, try the Stowe Ski Museum or even his friend Ed Morrison of Moriarty Hat Co.

I have not talked to Bob in years. If you reach him, please say hello for me.

Chad Klever

Centennial, CO

post #3 of 22

I have a 1966 Skiing magazine with an ad for and a review of Yamaha skis.  They go back a way.

post #4 of 22

I skied a pair of Yamaha HiFlex's from 1972 to 1978.  They were 195cms with Marker bindings.  I loved those skis and rode the pi$$ out of them as a very active teen/young adult with season pass at Blue Knob, PA.  Took them on my first trip west to Colorado in 1976 and remember jump-turning through deep crust/crud all day in Vail's back bowls.

 

I won them in a contest when my number (actually it was my mom's) was drawn by late Olympian Spider Sabich.  He presented them to me at a ski store give-away in Tyson's Corner, VA. I skied them about 30-50 days a season until 1978 (they outlasted poor Spider).

 

Although Yamaha skis did not enjoy an elite reputation, I read here on Epicski once that Finn Christian "Finken" Jagge (born April 4, 1966 in Stabekk) a former Norwegian Alpine skier won the gold medal in the slalom competition at the 1992 Olympics in Albertville on Yamaha skis.  Yamaha discontinued making skis a long time ago, and if above is true I'm surprised they would have still been in the business as late as 1992.

 

Thanks for the very pleasant blast from the past.

 

With the Hi Flex's at Killington in the mid-70s:

bfa7dce8_old+ski+photos+005.jpg

 

My Hi Flex models looked a lot like your All Arounds, except with the words Hi (High) Flex instead of All Around.  IRRC from the contest, the Hi Flex was a top of the line recreational model from Yamaha at the time.  I suspect the price you paid for your skis is about correct for insurance, i.e., virtually nothing.frown.gif  

post #5 of 22

I have a pair of Red Yamaha Skis that say All-round I on them. They were my Dad's and he gave them to me when I joined the Ski Club in High School... in the 80's. Now they are collecting dust in my garage. My Husband was just cleaning out the garage and wanted me to throw them away... I didn't and was wondering if they were worth anything???

post #6 of 22

WOW do "Yamerhammers" bring back memories...I skied Yamaha Freestyles in the mid 1970's. They . were a "cheap"  ski...Yamahas were a mostly wood ski with fiberglass "core"  all their skis were a laminated wood ski with a very thin fiberglass "tape" running smack down the center or "core" of the ski....they were "fair" at best.....broke tips and delaminated at the  center fiberglass "core" repaired mine many times with Elmers wood glue and the "new" Krazy  glue..man did I just age myself.....I remember when Krazy glue was invented.....sheesh!!!

post #7 of 22

I rented a pair of Yamaha All Round III from Hecht's department store in Washington DC for a weekend at Blue Knob in 1972. I wonder if Jim was there that weekend. The "Fiberglass" skis were much advanced from the metal Head Standards I had used (borrowed from my mom) or my old wooden Northlands (outgrown). I finally managed parallel turns with these modern skis. A nice sensation to turn both skis at the same time, a hard won skill for me. Great skis!

post #8 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MN Gal View Post

I have a pair of Red Yamaha Skis that say All-round I on them. They were my Dad's and he gave them to me when I joined the Ski Club in High School... in the 80's. Now they are collecting dust in my garage. My Husband was just cleaning out the garage and wanted me to throw them away... I didn't and was wondering if they were worth anything???

 

All-round I was more of an entry level ski. Collectors of vintage gear are usually interested in the more advanced models. The value of your skis is likely a small fraction of the value of the Yamaha Racer w/ Cubco that Chris Johnson bought for $2.50.

post #9 of 22

I had a pair of Yamaha Paramount Combi skis in 1975. I think they were black with red lettering. They were 195 and a race ski. I was a teenager at the time and they were almost impossible for me to ski in the bumps. I sold them and bought some 180cm Atomic ACS "freestyle" skis. I wish I still had the Yamahas. Three years after I bought the Atomics and after I started to fill out I bent the Atomics skiing bumps. They became the first rocker ski I ever saw.biggrin.gif

post #10 of 22

I skied the same pair on Thursday. I love them. Had to update bindings to an older 727.

I take them out once in a while when I get board on the shape skis.

post #11 of 22

I still ski these once in a while. They are fun and hold well on Ice. Quick turning. I skied them last Thursday.

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by VT Turns View Post

I still ski these once in a while. They are fun and hold well on Ice. Quick turning. I skied them last Thursday.

How about a picture. It would be nice to see if I actually remember what they looked like.

post #13 of 22

Dear friends

Happy new year

I've got a pair of Yamaha All round I with Marker bindings & I still ski on them once in a while.

 

Here is the picture:

http://www.8pic.ir/images/74174000353212799602.jpg

post #14 of 22

For the OP. Yamaha is/was a very diverse company. They actually started out as a manufacturer of high quality pianos. That is why the insignia is made of three crossed tuning forks. My youngest son played a Yamaha Alto Sax when he was in the high school band a few years back.

Quite a few ski patrollers used Yamaha skis in Michigan in the late 60's thru the early 70's as they were offered a great discount on Proform.

 

Karl

post #15 of 22

I picked up a pair of Yamaha 210 skis at the thrift shop in the early 70s. They were awful on the snow for me - but I certainly had insufficient skills at the time to work them. I figured they were too long so I cut about 20 cm off the tails and tried them. Still awful but honestly my skills hadn't improved much. To the back of the garage! A couple years later, when my skills had developed a bit, I took them to the local quarry and did some to "down to earth" skiing on the gravel walls of the quarry. Great fun! I'm not sure the Yamahas would ever work again on snow but I have fond memories of them rocking the rocks.

Eric

post #16 of 22

Skied the Paramount GS for a month or so around 67 in CO.  Very stiff and thought they were a pretty good ski.  They were one of the first glass skis I had skied so a very different feel to the metal.  

 

They were the first Japanese ski of note I remember, Kazama and Swallow to follow.  Are there any left on the market?

post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by CKlever View Post
 

Chris,

About 15 years ago I lived in Stowe, VT and my good friend (and landlord) was Bob Quinn. For many years he was the North America Sales VP for Yamaha Skis (I think during the 1970s and early 80's). Some of Bob's kids and grandkids still live in the Stowe / Waterbury area. I am certain that you can track one of them down and maybe get some information from them. If not, try the Stowe Ski Museum or even his friend Ed Morrison of Moriarty Hat Co.

I have not talked to Bob in years. If you reach him, please say hello for me.

Chad Klever

Centennial, CO

I skied/raced Yamahas supplied by Bob Q in the late 70's- early 80's. The race skies were amazing and for some time and a sizable amount of the professional skiers in Stowe were using his 2nd hand race skies. That was something that din't go over really well at the time and eventually Boots and Boards carried yamaha for a while.

 

Apparently Yamaha had some proprietary manufacturing techniques at the time and their skies were the best I'd ever used at the time and were used by a number of USST members.

 

Lost touch with Bob and his two boys James and Rob. His daughter [Mary Beth] is still in the ski business out west I believe.

 

Sorry to say I threw the last pair I owned away a few years ago [212 GS]. They had custom color Dynastar graphics screened on them from my day working for them anyway.

post #18 of 22

 

215's  Not the most user friendly skis I've been on...

post #19 of 22

Yamaha all rounds used to be the rentals at Manning Park B.C. 70's - skied on them once after breaking my own ski. Soft easy turning and very forgivable for beginners. Bought a cheap used pair when I started a girlfriend skiing. Passed them onto others later, good for the first step. 

post #20 of 22
I have a pair of all around II 175's somewhere in my barn, had em when I was 11 or 12. They were purchased from a shop in aspen, abt. 1971 or so.
post #21 of 22
My friend was the Midwest rep for Yamaha skis in the 70s. I bought a pair of SL racing skis for my teenage son. Unfortunately, he broke his leg wrestling and outgrew them the next year. Others I knew skied and raced them and thought them good.
post #22 of 22

bought a pair of hiflex secondhand around 69 or 70- put miller bindings on them- with long thongs (Dumb#$$ teenage kid) don't remember how they skied but remember the ads they had said they would guarantee  them if you accidently ran over them with your car.  I was rough on skis back then broke several jumping and hitting trees- was told I could tear up a iron anvil with a rubber mallet!  The skis were white like the OP's- 205's

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › any help on information about yamaha downhill skis?