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Quick Question RE: Kids with cold feet.........

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
My daughter loves to ski, but she has - quite possibly - the coldest feet/worst circulation ever. She's 5 and tiny......Any thoughts on things y'all have found to keep your kids' feet warm...Aside from the adhesive toe-warmers that invariably get jammed-up into the toe box?

Thanks!
post #2 of 18
 1 thin, clean, dry sock goes in the boot. Nothing else! Hike up the bottoms of her long underwear, etc. The adhesive footwarmers are good if you are really careful helping her put the boots on. Pull the tongue out and help her slide in. It can be done without turning it into a wrinkled mess.
post #3 of 18
Boot Gloves
post #4 of 18
 Bootgloves are great, but I've never seen one that small. Do they make them?
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 1 thin, clean, dry sock goes in the boot. Nothing else! Hike up the bottoms of her long underwear, etc. The adhesive footwarmers are good if you are really careful helping her put the boots on. Pull the tongue out and help her slide in. It can be done without turning it into a wrinkled mess.

quote for truth. more than 50 percent of kids cold feet are due to long underweat and or sweat pants and or snow pant tucked into the boot.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
She wears Smartwool ski socks. 1 pair. Thin. And no capilene in the boots.....Pants snugged down over the boot, so no snow gets in. Now that we've dispensed with all the sanctimony, any chance anyone has any suggestions that don't involve condescension?
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrambledawg View Post

She wears Smartwool ski socks. 1 pair. Thin. And no capilene in the boots.....Pants snugged down over the boot, so no snow gets in. Now that we've dispensed with all the sanctimony, any chance anyone has any suggestions that don't involve condescension?
 

warmer layer on her body will make her hands and feet warmer.

didnt mean to talk down but I see one person every day that has stuff tucked in their skis boots.
post #8 of 18
 Maybe check with a bootfitter. If she has a higher than average instep, maybe the tongue is pressing and cutting off circulation or something like that.
post #9 of 18
I've found the following game plan works:

Good socks - put them on at the hill.  They lose their warmth if they wear them to the hill and they get sweaty/wet.

Adhesive footwarmers.  You may have to put a new pair in at lunch.

Make sure that the boots are dry ... it amazing how wet/damp the boot liners can get.
post #10 of 18
Well you can experiment and children have a little more room then adults in their boots and far more room then I do.  I teach, I have poor circulation, I wear one pair of medium or thick smart wools socks. I also have thin ones for warmer weather and comfort in my boots.  I do not mean wearing awful thick hockey socks, don't double up but it might be worth a try if you can find a good fitting merino wool sock that fits her foot snugly.  Try the boot liner on to be sure she has room for them before you buy them.  Don't make her boots to tight or it will make her feet colder.  I always felt terrible for my boys when they were young and buying quality children's boots made a big difference also.  The cheaper rear entries they had at first always seemed to end up a little wet inside some how.  Too short maybe, I don't know.  But when I switched to higher quality children's front entries their feet seemed warmer.
post #11 of 18
For my 5-year old daughter I have her in a thin pair of ski socks (chilis), toe warmers, and Bootgloves.  I also make sure she has plenty of layers on so her core stays warm and continues to circulate blood to her hands and feet.  On her head she wears a balaclava and a neoprene face mask under her racing helmet.  If I keep the whole "package" warm, she is always the last child in her Nancy Greene group to complain of the cold (and we ski in sub -20°C temperatures quite regularly in Quebec).  I dress my 9-year old boy in I2 the same way with similar results.
post #12 of 18
Pull the liners every night after skiing and make sure they dry completely for the next day.  After you've done this half a dozen times, you'll find it pretty easy, especially with kids' boots.

Make sure the boots are warm & dry when they go on in the morning and they'll stay warm & dry longer.

Check for cold & dampness at lunchtime.  You can't really dry the boot out in the lodge mid-day, but a fresh and dry pair of socks can make the afternoon a lot more pleasant.
post #13 of 18
I would just add this: all boot liners are not created equally.  When you buy or lease, have the saleman take the liners out of all the boot options you are considering. Then inspect them and consider getting the boot with the best (warmest) liner.
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogulmuncher View Post

Pull the liners every night after skiing and make sure they dry completely for the next day.  After you've done this half a dozen times, you'll find it pretty easy, especially with kids' boots.

Make sure the boots are warm & dry when they go on in the morning and they'll stay warm & dry longer.

Check for cold & dampness at lunchtime.  You can't really dry the boot out in the lodge mid-day, but a fresh and dry pair of socks can make the afternoon a lot more pleasant.
 

best advice here. Plus the fact, I always put fresh socks on my boys as they put their ski boots on. Reason being? Chances are the boots they wore to the resort were wet from playing in them the night before. Another tip, having ski pants with gaitors tight enough to keep the snow out of their boots count just as much.
post #15 of 18
This is pretty common amongst many liitle kids and boot manufacturers don't make liners that insulate too well in order to keep the cost low. Those little feet just don't generate enough heat to keep up with the amount lost while being out in the cold. There isn't really too much you can do for long outings.

Here are some keys that can help (some already mentioned):
  • start with everything warm; socks, liners, shells; put them on at home. that way they keep warm in the car on the way there
  • start with dry with well fitted socks (Eurosocks are very good IMHO) and liners; and keep them dry
  • boot gloves help to slow down the heat loss; put them on while warm. they are worthless if they are cold to start with
  • toe warmers can be stuck to the top of the liners below the shell; it's not as warm as directly adhered to the sock but they stay on much better and heat is still trapped as it rises upwards; change to a new pair during lunch
  • a thin layer of tin foil can be used under the liner (places on or around the footbed) to reflex heat back to the feet
  • try boots with warmer liners; some Lange and Rossi jr boots are known to have better and warmer liners
  • use duct tape to seal the front of the boots from snow
  • Most importantly, come inside often
 



 
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 Maybe check with a bootfitter. If she has a higher than average instep, maybe the tongue is pressing and cutting off circulation or something like that.

Any chance her boots are buckled too tight?  I found my feet stay warmer when I backed off my ankle buckle one notch.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
  • start with everything warm; socks, liners, shells; put them on at home. that way they keep warm in the car on the way there
 

Good idea for short drives (e.g. less than 20 minutes); not my preference for longer drives because the feet can start to sweat inside the ski boots.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogulmuncher View Post




Good idea for short drives (e.g. less than 20 minutes); not my preference for longer drives because the feet can start to sweat inside the ski boots.

Good point. I thought of that too after I posted. I still think less than an hour is fine. Of course, I never warm up my car for anyone, my kids included. Also, I lower the heater after the car is heated to just above comfortable temp (about room temp). Being too warm in a car creates another problem much more serious than sweaty feet -- me nodded off at the wheel.
 
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