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What gear do you need for MT. Wshington??

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
What gear do you need for MT. Wshington??
post #2 of 23
Which Mt. Washington?
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
NH
post #4 of 23
I haven't been to that one.  Going on hear-say, I would bring racing skis with sharp edges, and warm clothes.
post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 
If i will need it what type of avalanche gear will i need?
post #6 of 23
It is advised to bring a beacon, probe, and transceiver like always when in avalanche terrain. You might realize that many others don't have this, but it's recommended since there still is a considerable chance of a slab.
post #7 of 23
When and where are you going to ski on Mt Washigton?
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
i dont have that planed yet
post #9 of 23
Well, most people who do it ski the Tuckerman's Ravine section and this is the page you will want to check out:

http://www.tuckerman.org/

Good luck.
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkuhn View Post

i dont have that planed yet

Mt Washington, NH is known for three things: tallest mountain in the north east, the "worst weather on earth" and the "deadliest small mountain in the world"... think about what you want to do there and go prepared. Think it through before you go. Be prepared when you go. travel with some experienced people when you go.
post #11 of 23
Bring knowledge, care, and a full avi kit.

http://timefortuckerman.com/
post #12 of 23
I've skied a bunch of different routes up  at Mt. Washington.....including Tucks ( the bowl)...and Heldsmans Highway.....although the avi danger is pretty low...(there were 3 slides at tucks the day we left last year) most are caused by inexperienced mountaniers who choose an incorrect approach path.
If you plan on staying in the leantos its really not that bad in late march , and april. Your definitely going to need an ice axe, crampons....and a light pack with the essential survival gear. I recommend skinning up the ski down path from the base lodge at the bottom. Even the though the trail is pretty short......the weight of your pack with skis and boots attached is going to make you miserable for 2-3hrs. Also bring a good stove and container (1-2 gallon expandable bladder)  for lugging back water from the well. A 15 degree synthetic bag and matt, and plenty of freeze dried food. And pick your days wisely according to the weather....it gets pretty crazy up there. 
post #13 of 23
The avalanche hazard can be severe in and around Tuckermans during the winter. There is an avalanche ranger stationed by the USFS at Tuckermans and the current conditions are regularly posted online. Skiing on the major routes can be pretty horrendous prior to the Spring skiing season which typically begins early April or possibly late March. The weather can be everything up there hence the significance of the "when" you are planning to ski. Up above the ravine especially, winter conditions can be especially severe. Plan on Himalayan assault type winter gear for any above timberline outing during winter and plan to carry bivouac gear in your pack including sleeping gear, shelter, stove and fuel as well as extra clothing. You can ski up there and there is an auto rd to the summit which is travelled by snowcats which transport people and equipment to the weather observatory on the summit. Skiing down it is pretty unexciting as you might expect although relatively safe but even so people have become lost in whiteouts and succumbed to the often brutal weather conditions. Other routes up there are possible in Winter including the East Snowfield and down Lion's Head or possibly East Gully but you had better be knowledgeable and prepared for avalanche terrain. There are other winter routes possible including traverses but I would not recommend these to anyone in Winter unless they have Winter mountaineering experience and equipment. There are several cabins including the Harvard cabin which is over toward Huntington's Ravine and another on Mt Adams to the North of Washington but these are normally used by mountaineers and iceclimbers in winter. There is a ski trail which descends from Hojos below the ravine bowl as well as another one that descends from the Gulf of Slides that are frequently skiied during the Winter. These can be day trips.

As you may be thinking, skiing really doesn't get going up there until Spring. By then it is an entirely different story although conditions can still be extremely variable depending upon the weather.
post #14 of 23
I haven't skied the mountain, but I've climbed it.

Avalanche hazards are marked by the rangers and they do get dicey. In fact, we were not able to climb Huntington Ravine technically because of avalanche risk in January. We ended up have to take a different route.

That being said, the weather on that mountain is just insane. Below the treeline, it can be absolutely gorgeous, but 20 feet higher can be a different world weather-wise. I have a photo of me on the summit fully planted with trekking poles leaning into the wind just to stay upright in near whiteout conditions. Below the treeline, it was a gorgeous 20º sunny day with barely a whisp of wind.

You can get into SERIOUS trouble by being under prepared. Don't disregard the mountain just because it's only 6000 feet. It's a REAL mountain...

Have fun...it would be great skiing.
post #15 of 23
Out of curiousity, how often do avalanches happen from skiers each season in April and May in Tucks?
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post




Mt Washington, NH is known for three things: tallest mountain in the north east, the "worst weather on earth" and the "deadliest small mountain in the world"...
 

See, it doesn't matter that it's only 6388 ft.  It'll still get you!  That's a little taller than the Mt.s in Florida anyway! :-)
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiking4 View Post

Out of curiousity, how often do avalanches happen from skiers each season in April and May in Tucks?
 

I can't answer this question but I think these are rare by April and May because snow conditions are usually quite different by then. Falling ice t hen can become a serious problem. Nevertheless Tuckermans can receive substantial snowfall during those months and this can alter the situation. I recall a year not long ago in which they got about 10 ft of snow during the month of May.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by skibum83 View Post

I've skied a bunch of different routes up  at Mt. Washington.....including Tucks ( the bowl)...and Heldsmans Highway.....although the avi danger is pretty low...(there were 3 slides at tucks the day we left last year) most are caused by inexperienced mountaniers who choose an incorrect approach path.
If you plan on staying in the leantos its really not that bad in late march , and april. Your definitely going to need an ice axe, crampons....and a light pack with the essential survival gear. I recommend skinning up the ski down path from the base lodge at the bottom. Even the though the trail is pretty short......the weight of your pack with skis and boots attached is going to make you miserable for 2-3hrs. Also bring a good stove and container (1-2 gallon expandable bladder)  for lugging back water from the well. A 15 degree synthetic bag and matt, and plenty of freeze dried food. And pick your days wisely according to the weather....it gets pretty crazy up there. 
 

Considering I was there in May when it went into single digits and dumped 18 inches of snow overnight, maybe a 0 degree bag would be better, and yes a mat is essential.   I only go there in April/May so this is based on that time of year. I bring crampons and ice axe, but have only used them on 3 trips in at least 20 trips, they were never essential. We do bring avy gear, but usually leave it in the car depending on the advisary.As for picking your days by the weather forecast, I've left 70 and sunny in Pinkham and climbed into 25 and overcast at Hojo's, weather is totally unpredictable on that mountain so be prepared for everything.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregDi View Post

I haven't skied the mountain, but I've climbed it.

Avalanche hazards are marked by the rangers and they do get dicey. In fact, we were not able to climb Huntington Ravine technically because of avalanche risk in January. We ended up have to take a different route.

That being said, the weather on that mountain is just insane. Below the treeline, it can be absolutely gorgeous, but 20 feet higher can be a different world weather-wise. I have a photo of me on the summit fully planted with trekking poles leaning into the wind just to stay upright in near whiteout conditions. Below the treeline, it was a gorgeous 20º sunny day with barely a whisp of wind.

You can get into SERIOUS trouble by being under prepared. Don't disregard the mountain just because it's only 6000 feet. It's a REAL mountain...

Have fun...it would be great skiing.
 

Dont underestimate the Presidentials even in the summer either!

Even in the middle of July its not unheard of to get caught in a snow storm (when its 80 degrees down in Crawford notch).  I was up on the summit of Mt Madison (only a few peaks over from Washington) on July 3rd three years ago when I started noticed some white stuff flying around along the 50mph winds.  Washington summit the next day wasnt much better. 

The place can smack you down in a heartbeat at any time of year.  Especially in winter where climbers look like they are preparing for an ascent of Everest. 
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post




See, it doesn't matter that it's only 6388 ft.  It'll still get you!  That's a little taller than the Mt.s in Florida anyway! :-)
 
Actually, 6288 '. And the meanest 6288 ' on the planet. And probably my favorite place on earth. Broke my leg skiing Tucks a week after my 13th birthday. Two weeks before my Bar Mitzvah. Didn't that piss off my mother. Forty years later I think she is still steamed.
post #21 of 23

It's a real general statement to say you want to ski Mt. Washington.  This mountain will kill you, regardless that it is only 6200 feet high.  If you have to ask the question what skis to use or what gear you need to bring, you should re-think your decision.  I lived in NH for a few years so don't let my current location fool you. 

You should start by joining the spring ritual and ski Tuckermanns.  It's a lot of fun and you'll need to prepare minimal gear. 

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

It's a real general statement to say you want to ski Mt. Washington.  This mountain will kill you, regardless that it is only 6200 feet high.  If you have to ask the question what skis to use or what gear you need to bring, you should re-think your decision.  I lived in NH for a few years so don't let my current location fool you. 

You should start by joining the spring ritual and ski Tuckermanns.  It's a lot of fun and you'll need to prepare minimal gear. 

I"m glad someone finally said this.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post



I"m glad someone finally said this.

 


I didnt think about it but you are right.  Sometimes it needs to be said outright and as explicitly as possible.  Dont underestimate it just because its 6288'.  It will kill you if you are unprepared no matter what time of year you go.  It *has* killed many people who thought they were headed just for another easy peak...
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