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going big and what to bring.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
 Hey there, I was hoping i could get some basic equipment advice for a guy always seeking the biggest line on the little mountains.  I never make it out to the US or Canadian Rockies but all over the east i'm looking for those out of the way drops and drifts all over the hill.  skiing 5-20 foot drops and bumps on trail edges,  and carving up the eastern crud and packed stuff on the double diamonds in between.  hitting drops and ramps hard,  and cruising at 40-55mph. i'm 23 and very athletic, been skiing hard all my life, i'm 5'11'' and weigh 165 i have tried a few offerings and really like the stability at high speed offered by some volkls, but now that the season has come in i find myself wanting big all mountain skis like the mantras.  do you have any pointers on skill progression with a freeride style outlook? and what equipment would you recommend for skis, boots, and bindings to check out? i've seen many new wide mounting bindings out now too, are they as good as it seems they would be? and last but not least, i'm on a budget and need the one ski quiver!

thanks a bunch-
post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrdimarco View Post

 Hey there, I was hoping i could get some basic equipment advice for a guy always seeking the biggest line on the little mountains.  I never make it out to the US or Canadian Rockies but all over the east i'm looking for those out of the way drops and drifts all over the hill.  skiing 5-20 foot drops and bumps on trail edges,  and carving up the eastern crud and packed stuff on the double diamonds in between.  hitting drops and ramps hard,  and cruising at 40-55mph. i'm 23 and very athletic, been skiing hard all my life, i'm 5'11'' and weigh 165 i have tried a few offerings and really like the stability at high speed offered by some volkls, but now that the season has come in i find myself wanting big all mountain skis like the mantras.  do you have any pointers on skill progression with a freeride style outlook? and what equipment would you recommend for skis, boots, and bindings to check out? i've seen many new wide mounting bindings out now too, are they as good as it seems they would be? and last but not least, i'm on a budget and need the one ski quiver!

thanks a bunch-

freeride style skll progression explain?

Freeriding is well free but the most technical proficient skiers can freeride where other less technically proficient cant freeride. So style is dictated but what works best unless well you like sucking.

whats mountain do you ski at most?

on advice highly consider rockered skis for tree skiing, go alittle shorter than you would think you would need, and get boots that you can bend easily. Dukes or baron help to access where other cant go.

skis I would consider

Volkl  Katana. 
Amarda JJ 
K2  OBseth
Atomic Bent chentler
O3PW - Billy Goats 
Rossi S7 and S3
Elan 1010
Dynstar - Huge Trouble

back up any of the above with a mid fat softer twin Extreme and whatever the dynstar new name scheem is are great.

notice all of the above are softer easier going fatter ski most with rocker. True eastern freeriding isnt that fast. Big mountain skis arent designed for Vermont or New hampshire but rather freeriding in huge wide open space. Lose the ego to get a big mountain ski and youll be better off the east coast. 
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
When i mentioned skill progression, i'm looking for pointers on what to do on the smaller mountains that will help my freeride ability should the time come i get on those big mountains(i'm looking into moving to colorado).

for locations, my local hills are hunter and windham in the catskills, and i take trips up to jay, stratton, and whiteface.

my slower speeds are through the trees, off the kickers, and over some drops.  maybe half my runs i encounter serious bumps, but generally i'm looking for a srtaighter line that carries speed and flies over the biggest drops i can find, and any scraps of deep snow. i also like to tuck down a groomed double sometimes and achieve some rediculous speed though. 

thanks for the ski recommendations, out of those i have a feeling that most are a little too powder oriented.  it seems like the jj or the huge troubles might be more versatile for the east. 

how bout boots?  something siff but comfy, and shock absorbant for the landings. maybe banshee, blaster pro, or shogun?  any helps appreciated.
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrdimarco View Post

When i mentioned skill progression, i'm looking for pointers on what to do on the smaller mountains that will help my freeride ability should the time come i get on those big mountains(i'm looking into moving to colorado).

for locations, my local hills are hunter and windham in the catskills, and i take trips up to jay, stratton, and whiteface.

my slower speeds are through the trees, off the kickers, and over some drops.  maybe half my runs i encounter serious bumps, but generally i'm looking for a srtaighter line that carries speed and flies over the biggest drops i can find, and any scraps of deep snow. i also like to tuck down a groomed double sometimes and achieve some rediculous speed though. 

thanks for the ski recommendations, out of those i have a feeling that most are a little too powder oriented.  it seems like the jj or the huge troubles might be more versatile for the east. 

how bout boots?  something siff but comfy, and shock absorbant for the landings. maybe banshee, blaster pro, or shogun?  any helps appreciated.

 

honestly learn to turn anywhere anytime, if your looking for skill building straightlining just shows you have some balls. If you truly freeriding in the east you shouldnt be skiing groomers except to drill yourself for stuff off the trail. 

your alittle misguided, The best freeriders in the world usually have some sort of technical background. They only straightline stuff whenever its the easiest or only way or the exception for comps. Tucking a groomed doubleblack isnt cool its pretty fing dangerous with how crowded the runs are around here. In fact anything thats groomed IMO isnt Doubleblack....

Boots whatever fits your foot. I like Krypton pros but others make like full tilt, Langes, or race stock boots. In the freeride community out west the most common boots you see are Kryptons, Full Tilts, and Race stock lange, and nordicas. Different stokes for different folks.

take some video of your self making turns whereever you want and come back to us and someone on here can help you out. Or come up to stowe and Ill take a couple runs with ya. the steep technical tree skiing here with drops is something Jay wishes it had. Beside the fact we dont get tracked out as fast as Jay since our woods runs arent on the map....
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrdimarco View Post

for locations, my local hills are hunter and windham in the catskills, and i take trips up to jay, stratton, and whiteface.

Your hills have bumps. Go ski them all day.
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
My technical background is super g and downhill racing when i was young, so the need for speed comes from there most likely.  as far as turning, i feel like everyone can improve their mogul riding ability, so you're right there.  as far as safety is concerned, you would be surprised how unbelievably empty windham is on a weekday.  i have yet to ski down a double with another person on it at the same time...the entire run!! i love midweek skiing, i never go on the weekend period, can't afford it anyhow..

The other thing is that all of the skis i've owned are narrower racing style volkls.  which are a blast early and late season in the east, but when the snow does come, they're like lead sinkers.   the only way to float them is to maintain 30mph or better.  i'm in the market for some cheap twintips that compliment my stiff racing ski background.  something along the lines of the head mojo 90 or the prophet 90's used a season or so.  what do you guys think about that?

i'm goin up to stratton in a week and a half, so i'll be spending my time in the trees finally.  at the local hills, we really need a big dump that we haven't had to get the few tree runs at hunter going.  when there's real snow the trees are where i like to be, and the bumps will certainly help there. 

oh, and if i wasn't poor, i'd certainly take you up on those runs at stowe, thanks!
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
wow, you guys are good! thanks for the heads up on the kryptons!! i think the rampage is the boot for me.  see i have a very narrow foot, and with a last of 98mm these are perfect! i'm used to having to wear two pairs of socks AND crank the buckles full tight, but these babies are just right. 

is the flex change effective and noticable?  these seem reasonably priced too...

thanks-
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrdimarco View Post

wow, you guys are good! thanks for the heads up on the kryptons!! i think the rampage is the boot for me.  see i have a very narrow foot, and with a last of 98mm these are perfect! i'm used to having to wear two pairs of socks AND crank the buckles full tight, but these babies are just right. 

is the flex change effective and noticable?  these seem reasonably priced too...

thanks-

ehhhh 2 pairs of socks? the kryptons have a 98mm last but you sound like you need a 95 lange fit with some sort of moldable liner. 2 pairs of socks means the boot doesnt fit right...
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
 no no, the fit is great.  i'm midway on the kryptons, and one sock.  i said i used to have to crank em and have two pairs of socks.  see old school liners get beat, and to get the same fit, over time they need to be tighter because the liner compresses.  

kryptons great-
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