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Waxing Skis - What am I doing wrong?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
So I'm a newbie when it comes to waxing skis and have only done it less than 5 times and can't seem to get it done nicely.

When I waxed my skis last night, I noticed that after waiting 15-30 minutes for the wax to cool, that the wax on some sections of the base primarily near the tip had appeared to be cracked. I didn't touch or remove the skis off the vice before it cooled, thinking that maybe moving it or accidentally applying stress to it will cause it to crack.

I have tried to run the iron over the wax again to have it remelted and noticed that roughly the same appearance.

Does anyone know what's causing this?

I am using a Swix Iron with Green wax w/ the temp set at 300F.
post #2 of 9
Those hard waxes just do that.

Are you sure you need that cold of a wax?

It might help to prep the ski with a slightly warmer wax if they are new or have not been waxed much.  Then wax with the cold brittle stuff and scrape before it cools completely.  Rescrape and brush after more cooling..  Brush and polish the crap out of those cold weather waxes.  There should be nothing left on the surface when you are done, just what soaked into the base.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
We primarily ski in Ontario and Quebec, where the temperatures can range from around -10C to -25C (14F to -13F), hence the green wax. I do have blue wax lying around which I do use when the temperatures do get warmer.

I have yet to scrap the wax off the base, something I'll be doing this evening. But was wondering now, since there are cracks in the wax and it sounds like it's normal for this type of wax to do that stuff... Should I just continue as is? Or should I remove everything, re-wax with the blue, scrape, and than apply green on top?
post #4 of 9
Try warming up the base with an iron and scrape off the excess wax while it's still hot. Then top it with a couple of layers of a warmer wax (hot scrap in between and blue will work).

For your local temp at the coldest, a blend of blue and green might be your best bet anyway. In fact, it's the snow temp that matters and not the ambient.

Good luck.
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

It might help to prep the ski with a slightly warmer wax if they are new or have not been waxed much.  Then wax with the cold brittle stuff and scrape before it cools completely.  Rescrape and brush after more cooling..  Brush and polish the crap out of those cold weather waxes.  There should be nothing left on the surface when you are done, just what soaked into the base.

^ This.   
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberFunk View Post

... Should I just continue as is? Or should I remove everything, re-wax with the blue, scrape, and than apply green on top?
 

Good cold Canadian weather eh?  Don't worry about the cracks, just re-iron the wax and scrape it while it is still warm enough not to chip off.

When skis are in dire need of wax, as in new or neglected, I frequently wax them with a thick coat which I reheat every time I go out to the garage for a beer.

When it it really cold and the glide is like styrofoam you don't want to mix in any warm waxes.  If the skis were prepped with a warmer wax, waxing and hot scraping with a cold wax a few time is a good idea.  Those cold waxes take a bit to work in to the base.
post #7 of 9
 using waxing fleece (kind of paper towel) between the iron and  helps to get the proper distribution of the layer and a bit thinner, less excess to scrape.
If you have this often and wax more, check out rotobrushes they make life a bit easier
post #8 of 9

As a Minesooootan, we know how to wax for cold temps.  What you are experiencing is normal.  Like the other guys have said, any Swix 4 wax, or similar temp in other brands, needs to be scraped warm. Then let it cool, re-scrape and brush out.  A stainless steel brush will save lots of aggravation too.  This cracking appearance is completely normal.  One more suggestion:  Use a little LF3 powder with the 4.  Sprinkle it on, mostly on the edges and underfoot, then drip on your 4 and iron in as normal.  This will reduce edge burn in cold/icy conditions and hold your wax a little longer.  Happy waxing.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post




Good cold Canadian weather eh?  Don't worry about the cracks, just re-iron the wax and scrape it while it is still warm enough not to chip off.

When skis are in dire need of wax, as in new or neglected, I frequently wax them with a thick coat which I reheat every time I go out to the garage for a beer.

When it it really cold and the glide is like styrofoam you don't want to mix in any warm waxes.  If the skis were prepped with a warmer wax, waxing and hot scraping with a cold wax a few time is a good idea.  Those cold waxes take a bit to work in to the base.


Thanks for the advice!

The method of scraping it while it was still warm and than re-scraping and brushing after it cooled worked perfectly!
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