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resources for an intermediate

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
This is actually a double post from "ask a ski pro"- I wasn't sure the eact differences categories.

Hi all am a frequent lurker, and have gleaned quite a bit from some you folks.  I am looking for some advice.

My father in law is 73, and started skiing in his mid 60's.  He is a Brit, and comes over once a year, skis probably 10 days a year.

He loves it.  he retains his skill level by watching videos and thinking about and visualizing skiing. 

My wife and I are both primarily telemark, and not instructors, so we are limited in how much help we can be.

I am looking for advice on resources- books or online videos.  A disc would be fine as well, but it would have to brit format.  He is watching some online stuff, and I am concerned that some of it is not the best quality. 

I would appreciate any suggestions.  He skis like this: 

post #2 of 12
The video is a great example of a skier compensating for being ‘overedged’.
 
Your father in law would benefit greatly from having his ski boots properly aligned. You will be amazed at the results, it would give him much improved balance and control (that means more fun for him and you).
 
If you are skiing in the Tahoe area you should contact Bud Heishman and have the boot work done, there is no need to waste another day compensating for alignment issue that can be corrected.
post #3 of 12
 If he only skis 10 days/year and has the zeal that you describe about his skiing I would suggest that he take a lesson from a qualified instructor. This would allow him to learn a more efficient technique as well as be evaluated for his boot fit and alignment as mentioned above. At his age his current technique requires more energy and stamina than necessary to fully enjoy his limited number of days on skis. Learning a few simple techniques will allow him to better utilize his skis to decrease the required physical input. 
But if he is happy and thrilled with his skiing at this point, why make a deal out of getting better. 
post #4 of 12
 HHTele, I just posted to you over in Ask A Pro.  
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input.
And Rick, thank you for responding in both threads.

The only point to his skiing is fun.  However, he is the kind of guy who get's satisfaction from improvement.

If he was happy skiing the way he skis, neither of us would ever mention a thing, or point him toward lessons, etc.

We are incredibly psyched to have turned him on to skiing.

hhtele
post #6 of 12
Quote:
The video is a great example of a skier compensating for being ‘overedged’.
 
Your father in law would benefit greatly from having his ski boots properly aligned.

HI- trying to follow, I assume by overedged (and "aligned") you are talking about canting and using a footbed? 

Len
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenkearney View Post




HI- trying to follow, I assume by overedged (and "aligned") you are talking about canting and using a footbed? 

Len
 

Len,
Yes, I am referring to alignment issues. The term ‘overedged’ is used to describe a problem of ‘canting’ in which the ski would come onto edge to early. The skier then must compensate to maintain balance.
 
The 'footbed' and 'boot cuff' deal with a different aspect of alignment and compensations are seen in the transverse plane of movement and the inability to maintain pressure on the first metatarsal (ball of the foot).
 
post #8 of 12
Why not get better? Just because he is older? I find that reasoning condescending. Also, safety comes to mind. Better boot fit and better skill usually equals better performance and avoidance of dangerous scenarios such as a boot not releasing because of an improper fit.
The son is asking for advice and skiing better with an improved fit combined with better technique makes sense.
EJL
post #9 of 12
Wow, I must need to find a ton of resources myself!  I thought your father in law was pretty decent.  I am surprised no one mentioned him turning his shoulders as he turns, instead of keeping them faced towards the fall line.  In my experience turning your shoulders makes it so you have to expend much more energy to turn. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHTELE View Post

This is actually a double post from "ask a ski pro"- I wasn't sure the eact differences categories.

Hi all am a frequent lurker, and have gleaned quite a bit from some you folks.  I am looking for some advice.

My father in law is 73, and started skiing in his mid 60's.  He is a Brit, and comes over once a year, skis probably 10 days a year.

He loves it.  he retains his skill level by watching videos and thinking about and visualizing skiing. 

My wife and I are both primarily telemark, and not instructors, so we are limited in how much help we can be.

I am looking for advice on resources- books or online videos.  A disc would be fine as well, but it would have to brit format.  He is watching some online stuff, and I am concerned that some of it is not the best quality. 

I would appreciate any suggestions.  He skis like this: 

post #10 of 12
I think your Father inlaw is doing great. My mother called me meny years ago at age 65 and said I want to learn to ski.
A few things to remember is at 73 we arnt as plyable as we are at 20.
Looks to me like hes ready to learn a bit of seperation ( keeping the upper body a little more down hill) I think that will help his turn initiation greatly, and give him a slightly better feeling of ballance over the ski instead of against the ski. It really looks great right now , remember musle memory is learned over time and is easier learned when we are younger and have little to change. Little bits at a time is important.
Great job
post #11 of 12
One lesson from a qualified instructor would have your father initiating his turns smoother.  He has a slightly forced initiation.  An instructor can teach him to let his skis initiate through a proper weight transfer from one turn to the next.  He needs to release the edge a little sooner in the turn, while he's crossing the hill on edge, allow the ski to flatten and then start the new turn with a gradual edging (the edging starts from the pressure needed against the centrifical forces of the turn, wait to feel the need).   Learning some upper body separation will help this weight transfer to happen smoothly and gradually through the turn and smooth out his appearance along with taking less effort to start the skis turning.  They will start all on their own if one is patient, flattens the ski and allows it to come up on edge based on the pressure of the ski slope against the ski.  Your father-in-law is doing awesome and has some great edge technique and turn completion.  Get him one lesson for a couple hours if he can afford it and it will smooth him out greatly. 
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by HHTELE View Post

This is actually a double post from "ask a ski pro"- I wasn't sure the eact differences categories.

Hi all am a frequent lurker, and have gleaned quite a bit from some you folks.  I am looking for some advice.

My father in law is 73, and started skiing in his mid 60's.  He is a Brit, and comes over once a year, skis probably 10 days a year.

He loves it.  he retains his skill level by watching videos and thinking about and visualizing skiing. 

My wife and I are both primarily telemark, and not instructors, so we are limited in how much help we can be.

I am looking for advice on resources- books or online videos.  A disc would be fine as well, but it would have to brit format.  He is watching some online stuff, and I am concerned that some of it is not the best quality. 

I would appreciate any suggestions.  He skis like this: 



First of all, I have taken lesson and the teachers weren't all that great.  They were probably about my skill but has some pre programmed drills :(

I used to ski like your father in law, shoulders turning with each turn.  When my dad taught me to keep my shoulders pointed DOWNHILL, I had SO MUCH MORE FUN SKIING!!  At the end of each turn, it was like a spring  ready to turn, and my skiing was SO MUCH FUNNER!!
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