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What would happen if...?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
 If a company made skis that are "shaped" but backwards. Instead of the ski curving in at the middle it curved out. So the ski would almost be like a vary slim oval. What would this result in if someone were to ski on it? (The picture for my idea is horrible, but it should give a bit more clarification to my idea, although the curve out is a bit overdone for examples sake)
post #2 of 13
What would happen? The wayback machine would take you back to 2001 and change your name to McConkey.
post #3 of 13
You would be about 15 years behind Shane McConkey.

Edit:  Heh, beat me to it.
post #4 of 13
Search for Volant Spatula or Praxis Powder Boards.
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
 I looked up those skis and those weren't exactly what I was thinking. I was looking at something not so wide, an "all-mountain" (save the debate on the there is no ski that can do everything please) ski that is not as wide as those powder skis with a more pronounced outward curve, one that would be the equivalent to the inward curve of a ski, for numbers sake lets say a 14m curve simply flipped so its going outwards.
post #6 of 13
Well, they did that too once.  It proved to be catastrophic, as the skis did not bend to form an arc on the terrain, but rather bent the terrain to form an arc.

As much fun as Glen Plake, Chuck Norris, et al. had ripping in the highlands of Arizona, the continued warping of spacetime caused a localized weakening and limited collapse of such to form what is known today as the Grand Canyon.  It was fortunate that damage was as limited as it was.
post #7 of 13
I've always wanted to ski a powder day on a couple oversized spoons.
post #8 of 13
I'm not sure what effect you're trying to have with these skis -- in deep powder, there's something to be said for the increased surface area of the skis, but with a thinner ski on harder snow a reverse sidecut ski is simply going to have a very small amount of edge in contact with the snow. You're not going to be able to carve and they're going to be very unstable on edge. You'll be able to skid your skis around, and they'll be skiable, but they won't really be enjoyable.

See the Praxis/Spats to see why those work in the deep stuff.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks that was what I was looking for
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleph Null View Post

 with a thinner ski on harder snow a reverse sidecut ski is simply going to have a very small amount of edge in contact with the snow. You're not going to be able to carve and they're going to be very unstable on edge. You'll be able to skid your skis around, and they'll be skiable, but they won't really be enjoyable.
 
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 I looked up those skis and those weren't exactly what I was thinking. I was looking at something not so wide, an "all-mountain" (save the debate on the there is no ski that can do everything please) ski that is not as wide as those powder skis with a more pronounced outward curve, one that would be the equivalent to the inward curve of a ski, for numbers sake lets say a 14m curve simply flipped so its going outwards.

Search on "Gauer" ski dance skis.

That's a mid-1990s example, there have been much, much earlier models also.    Nishizawa had a patent on it (US4487426)  in 1984.     Shane McConkey came along just as the patent expired and the idea became public domain.

As to 'not' being able to carve, 'not' is a strong word.    Hockey skates can carve with minimal edge contact.
post #11 of 13
Okay, you couldn't use modern edging technique in order to rail a purely carved turn as you'd expect from a traditionally sidecut ski.

The skis don't have a natural turning radius so that type of "ideal" turn isn't possible. I can imagine, especially on a ski as short at the Gauer that you could do a lot of interesting things with keeping the ski flat on the snow, which I think is the point of the dance skis -- to help reduce the likelyhood of catching an edge while spinning flat?
post #12 of 13
For all practical purposes I agree, with the proviso that:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleph Null View Post


The skis don't have a natural turning radius

If you limit flex in the contact zone to almost-non-existent, you can give the skis in that zone the same sort of natural turning radius ice skates are custom-bent and custom-ground to.   

Put a reverse sidecut, reverse camber ski on edge.   The edge profile is like an ice skate, just further from the axis of the leg.
post #13 of 13
I can buy that -- didn't think about a reverse camber. sounds like it could be fun. From this discription: :

Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 I was looking at something not so wide, an "all-mountain" (save the debate on the there is no ski that can do everything please) ski that is not as wide as those powder skis with a more pronounced outward curve, one that would be the equivalent to the inward curve of a ski, for numbers sake lets say a 14m curve simply flipped so its going outwards.
I was thinking about a ski in the neighborhood of a supershape -- 160-175 cm long with a strange profile like 40-80-40... guess with the reverse camber you could do it... still be rather strange.
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