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Snowmobile Skier in Fatal Avalanche

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 12
 I heard that a snowmobiler was killed in an avalanche north of Yellowstone Park this weekend.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
 Looks like a few more snowmobilers have been killed in BC by an avalanche just this afternoon at an event near Revelstoke BC.
Several hundred snowmobilers attended an event when an avalanche hit. This is a massive search and rescue effort and will likely take days before everything is resolved. Hopefully everyone one else is accounted for and the number of those dead and severely injured is limited to the current amount. 
Read more here if you like: 
http://backcountryskiingcanada.com/forums/?page_id=3/safety-talk/several-snowmobilers-die-in-b-c-avalanche
post #4 of 12
 That is terrible.
post #5 of 12
condolences to friends and family. never good to hear, at least they went out doing what they loved.
post #6 of 12
The avalanche on Boulder MT. near Revelstoke, B.C. is 25 to 30 feet deep by almost a half mile wide so it sounds like the whole mountain came down. There have been severe avalanche warnings in the area for weeks but 200 snowmobilers chose to hold an unsanctioned event anyways. Seems like snowmobilers are even more brain dead than snow boarders.
post #7 of 12
holy crap!  thats crazy
post #8 of 12
A post from stalefish_132 over on http://www.snowandmud.com/forum/14/big-iron-slide-turbo-march-13-a-28715-8.html

"Re: Big Iron Slide @ Turbo March 13,2010

it still doesnt seem real, me and my 2 buddies had just pulled into turbo and we looking for a group that we were going to meet up with. i heard some screams and saw some avy bags being deployed, i turned around and saw a cloud of snow dust, i pinned it for a goup of trees, just made it out of the slide path by about 10 ft, a guy behind me got caught in the slide and i think the sled rolled over him, he got out tho, 20 ft away a guy got his neck broke. my guess would be about 150-200 sleds sitting at the bottom of the hill. i cant even explain what it was like, it was sickening. i'm still shaking.

i wish this all was a dream, sadly its not. i know my sledding season is done.

RIP those that didnt make it"

I feel some sympathy for the families, but, going out snowmobiling up the mountain in extreme avalanche conditions.  Call the tune; pay the piper.
post #9 of 12
This is horrible. 
post #10 of 12
The number of people injured is in the dozen's and ONLY 2 have been killed so I guess this is sort of good news as there were150 to 200 spectators all standing at the bottom of the slope in the slide path.

With their super powerful machines the sled heads have almost unlimited access to the back country yet as a group they appear to be the least aware, least cautious of all the back country users. It is time for the snowmobile industry to take a significant role in back country travel education.
post #11 of 12
My experience around here has been that the core sledders, as a group, seem to be advancing their knowledge much faster than a lot of the skiers I see and some that I know.  At retail prices it will cost about $600-$700 to get the needed safety gear and take an Avy 1 course.  This is chump change to the sled neck who is spending $6,000-$10,000 every two years for a decent mountain sled.  Ten years ago most of the sledders I spoke with didn't know jack.  Now most of them have the gear and the training to make reasonable decisions.  I see lots of skiers who treat the backcountry like their personal amusement park and don't have gear or training. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

The number of people injured is in the dozen's and ONLY 2 have been killed so I guess this is sort of good news as there were150 to 200 spectators all standing at the bottom of the slope in the slide path.

With their super powerful machines the sled heads have almost unlimited access to the back country yet as a group they appear to be the least aware, least cautious of all the back country users. It is time for the snowmobile industry to take a significant role in back country travel education.
post #12 of 12
The safety Nazis are already crying out for more government regulation..

The RCMP are trying to figure out who to charge with criminal negligence.  It was an unsanctioned event, but there were apparently sponsors.

Soon you won't be able to go onto crown land in the winter without being government certified, permitted, licensed, trained, and, of course, government fleeced.

Back in the good old days, if you went off into the wilds and died in an avalanche it was your own damned fault.  You couldn't blame anyone and you couldn't sue anyone, but at least you didn't have anyone telling you you were'nt allowed to go.
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