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Can one maintain for aft balance without flexion/extension movements? Why or why not?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
 Can one maintain for/aft balance without flexion/extension movements.  Why or why not?  Is it passive or active if no?
post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 
 Where r u tdk, hellava, bud?
post #3 of 17
On the PMTS forum.
That's the place to get an answer for this question.
post #4 of 17
Can a statue ski well ? Or is it just going along for the ride ?
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by LCS View Post

On the PMTS forum.
That's the place to get an answer for this question.

 
Maybe TGR would be even better but try them all and compare the results.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by prjb1 View Post

 Can one maintain for/aft balance without flexion/extension movements.  Why or why not?  Is it passive or active if no?

I would say that this is not possible unless you are on completely consistent terrain.  As soon as the terrain changes pitch at all, that will cause your body to either move forward or backward, and you would need to flex and/or extend at least one of the ankles, knees or hips to maintain your balance.   

If you have completely consistent pitch and terrain then technically you could pick one flexion/extension "setting" and hold it.  
I would call the movement active - you are flexing/extending in response to a change in your body position resulting from a change of terrain. 

Curious - what solicited this question?  Did you have a theory?

Elsbeth
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
 if i was pms'n  i wouldnt ask!!!!
post #8 of 17
PSIAMan can maintain fore/aft balance without flexion/extension. Now where is that silly GIF?

prjb -> exactly what body parts are you thinking of and how picky do you want to be about the answer? Whether skiing or walking, most people are unaware of exactly how much our ankles are used to maintain balance. It is my understanding that, technically, the ankle joint is only manipulated by muscle flexion to both open and close the joint. There are a dozen other ways to weasel out a "yes" answer, but what's the point?
post #9 of 17
Is this a trick question? Only if straight lining down perfectly consistent terrain... otherwise I challenge anyone to keep their joints from flexing or extending.
post #10 of 17
 If you want, and if you keep the edge angle low enough, you can actually ski with very little flexion extension beyond micro management.  Like GarryZ says, though, very statue like.  Different strokes for different folks.
post #11 of 17
The old saying about all the parts (joints included) participating in our balancing activities comes to mind here. A stiff or unmovable leg would be very much like a wheel on a wagon in that all the little bumps in a road would cause the wheel to bounce. Losing contact with the road would reduce control and grip. Same occurs on skis. Flexing and extending allows us to keep our core in a more balanced zone and eliminates a lot of the bouncing into the air that would otherwise occur without it.
post #12 of 17
I would venture to say that if you tried to ski like a statue, the range of flexion and extension would be quite small but the intensity would be quite high to maintain that position as you get bounced around.  Not going with the flow takes alot of work.
post #13 of 17
JASP, yep!  Old guys like us can remember when getting bounced around was much more of a factor than it is on today's abundance of perfectly groomed, carpet smooth trails.  Dog in a bathtub skiing doesn't necessarily come with the price it used to.  Those tarmac trails are very good for teaching/learning, to a point.  

Snowhawk, good observation.  Very true.  It's the reason when we arc on a long and strong outside leg, we don't extend it to the point of being locked.  A small degree of flexion leaves it ready to act as a shock absorber over undulating terrain.  It also makes center balancing possible.  Think about it.  
post #14 of 17
Yes you can, within a very narrow subset of the skiing environment.

No, you shouldn't, because the range of application of static positioning is so narrow.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post

PSIAMan can maintain fore/aft balance without flexion/extension. Now where is that silly GIF?

prjb -> exactly what body parts are you thinking of and how picky do you want to be about the answer? Whether skiing or walking, most people are unaware of exactly how much our ankles are used to maintain balance. It is my understanding that, technically, the ankle joint is only manipulated by muscle flexion to both open and close the joint. There are a dozen other ways to weasel out a "yes" answer, but what's the point?



Quite literally, you could maintain fore/aft balance over the BoS without flexion/extension; just not necessarily over the feet. That is what PSIA Man illustrates.
post #16 of 17

Ithis is the only turn PSIA man can do. If everything isn't just right he crashes.

post #17 of 17

Paraphrasing the OP's original question: "Are fore-aft balancing movements separable from up-down movements? Should they be?" The answers are yes and yes. These two categories of movements subserve entirely different functions. The fact that most skiers can't regulate these motions independently is one of the factors that relegates them to mediocrity.

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