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How to Wax?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Let me explain. I am only 16 and as such have been growing since I started skiing. I would get new skis every 2 years or so and only ski a handful of days and not very hard, and when I'd get new skis they had already been waxed for me. Now I'm pretty much done growing and don't plan on getting new skis anytime soon. I'm also skiing harder and more so I need to know how to wax my skis. I tried searching and all I could find is bits and tips everywhere. I don't need a race wax or anything special I just have $3 blocks of green wax from the local shop. I wanted to know if anyone has or could create a step by step guide of how to wax skis. Thanks

-Tyler
post #2 of 7
post #3 of 7
Here's a start:


Check out the waxing section of SlideWright's Tuning and Waxing weblog' and search this forum.

(FAQ)

Cleaning and regularly waxing your bases is the most common and easiest ski and snowboard maintenance task. It will protect your boards and optimize the glide and turns.

Basic Hot Waxing Steps:
1) Bring the skis or snowboard to room temperature if possible.
2) Place the board(s) on a good work surface that can secure them for scraping.
3) Clean the bases with base cleaner or hot scraping.
4) Drip, crayon, hot touch & crayon or hot touch iron smear solid wax onto clean and dry base. Less wax requires less scraping, brushing & mess to clean up.
5) While keeping the iron moving, spread and melt the wax evenly over the entire base. A trail of liquid wax should just follow the iron.
6) Work the wax in again to assure coverage
7) Let the wax cool and harden for a minimum of 30 minutes.
8) Scrape wax down to base with a sharp plexi scraper to an even, thin film.
9) Free the base structure by brushing out the micro-grooves/structure of the bases and polish to a nice sheen with manual or roto brushes (or both).
10) Clean up the mess and then go glide fast and make smoother turns!

However you wax your boards, be sure to clean the bases very well and pay attention to structuring to reduce suction for better slide, especially in wetter conditions. The Maplus liquids and sprays will achieve a higher level of saturation and durability than hot waxing with solid waxes by simply applying and rubbing in with cork or felt. Saving lots of time and effort, they are easier to apply and control amounts, less or no scraping or brushing is necessary for high performance. For optimal performance, add heat by moving a iron down the ski or snowboard, over a saturation. After at least 10 minutes and the wax has hardened, polish the excess wax with horsehair or nylon brush to expose the structure. When waxing, realize that you are trying to get the wax into the base, not on the base. Scraping and brush polishing removes the excess and exposes the base structure.

HELPFUL TIPS:
-We recommend cleaning the ski or snowboard bases with Maplus detergents and then applying a hot Maplus Racing Base after each race or after preparing the ski or snowboard bases and edges.
-All traces of basic wax must be thoroughly removed before applying racing wax: scrape off the wax and then brush and polish thoroughly.
-If you clean the ski or snowboard bases with a detergent immediately before applying racing wax, we recommend heating the wax so the detergent can evaporate completely.

-We recommend the following iron temperatures to melt Maplus ski or snowboard waxes:

-120°C (248°F): Universal;
-130°C (266°F): (Soft – Soft Graphite)Racing Base, (P1-P2-P3) Hot;
-140°C (284°F): (P1-P2-P3) Med;
-150°C (302°F): (P1-P2-P3) Cold;
-160°C (320°F): (Hard – Hard Graphite)Racing Base, P4.

If used improperly, the waxing iron can damage the ski or snowboard construction.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
 Thanks for all the help, just 2 things I could use clarified:
1. What do I do to clean the bases, I'm looking to just do it at home without hopefully having to go buy any more stuff than I already have, can I wipe it down with a wet cloth or something akin to that?
2. How do I brush the base after scraping it? Use a hard bristle brush and run the length of the ski or just brush all different directions?
post #5 of 7
For your type of skiing, here's what I do...

1--With a garage sale iron and a piece of aluminum foil over the steam holes, set the iron temperature so it melts the wax when the block of wax is held against it, but the wax does not smoke.

2--Place the dry & room temperature skis bottom-side-up over newspaper or anything so wayward wax drips don't do damage.  With the stout rubber band off a bunch of broccoli, or anything that works, get the brakes out of the way.

3--Drip some wax on the bottoms, maybe each drip about 1-1/2 inch apart.

4--Rub the iron on the ski bottoms melting the wax into the pores of the bottom material.  KEEP THE IRON MOVING!  Do not get the ski any hotter than just barely warm on the top side (which is now underneath) at the max.  

5--Completely coated?  Good.  Re-melt and immediately wipe the excess off with a dry paper towel.

6--Go skiing.  This wax job will last as long as any job with that same wax.  You'll be as fast as any wax job after the first run.
post #6 of 7

I'm a complete nob regarding waxing. Melting the wax ironing , brushing etc, no doubt the best method, but I don't want to do that. Was intrigued with the Raysway method. But what type of wax is being used in the pictures . Looks like something that looks like it was squirted out of a tube!

I didn't know ski wax came in a package and a form you could squirt onto a ski!  Am I missing the obvious?

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Not to doubt you, but anyone else ever use this method, is it basically as effective as the more conventional melt, scrape, and brush method?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

For your type of skiing, here's what I do...

1--With a garage sale iron and a piece of aluminum foil over the steam holes, set the iron temperature so it melts the wax when the block of wax is held against it, but the wax does not smoke.

2--Place the dry & room temperature skis bottom-side-up over newspaper or anything so wayward wax drips don't do damage.  With the stout rubber band off a bunch of broccoli, or anything that works, get the brakes out of the way.

3--Drip some wax on the bottoms, maybe each drip about 1-1/2 inch apart.

4--Rub the iron on the ski bottoms melting the wax into the pores of the bottom material.  KEEP THE IRON MOVING!  Do not get the ski any hotter than just barely warm on the top side (which is now underneath) at the max.  

5--Completely coated?  Good.  Re-melt and immediately wipe the excess off with a dry paper towel.

6--Go skiing.  This wax job will last as long as any job with that same wax.  You'll be as fast as any wax job after the first run.
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