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Bent edge repair

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I have a pair of skis that I have skied on only 3 days now and I already dinged up one of the edges below the heel of the binding . The length of the bent edge spot is about 1.5 in. long measuring from the very start to the end of the bent spot. There is no separation of the base from the edge...yet. The skis are Blizzard Titan Cronus and they have a sandwich sidewall construction. The entire sidewall (from the base to the top sheet) in the bent edge area is pushed upward in that spot (you can feel a rise in the top sheet above the bent edge). There are no cracks or separation of the sidewall or topsheet though either.

I will use that edge if that ski as an outside edge and will watch the base/edge area for any separation in the future, but should I get the ski to a ski shop and have them try to straighten the edge back to being in plane?

Heres two pictures:


post #2 of 13
I don't know what you could possibly do to fix that and I think if it were me I would call the Manufacturer and ask them what they think, explaining of course, that you have never done this kind of damage in past and are quite surprised to see it.  You can't think of any way to fix it and is there anything they can do to help the situation as you have only skied on them 3 days.  Very least, maybe they can offer to fix for a charge or sell you one ski.  They don't like to do the one ski thing as they make matched sets, but you never know....
post #3 of 13
did that happen on a box or rail?
post #4 of 13
Can't fix that. See if a shop will take em for warranty. If you know the rep well, sometimes they can pull strings and get you a new pair.
post #5 of 13
No way will the manufacturer warranty that damage, as it was obviously caused by misuse or misadventure and not a manufacturing defect.  Out of curiosity, how did you damage it?  I damaged a ski in a similar way by landing on an exposed tree root and got no sympathy from the shop or ski rep. 
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by exracer View Post

No way will the manufacturer warranty that damage, as it was obviously caused by misuse or misadventure and not a manufacturing defect.  Out of curiosity, how did you damage it?  I damaged a ski in a similar way by landing on an exposed tree root and got no sympathy from the shop or ski rep. 

I had a pair of Racetiger GS skis that had a dented edge. I had no idea what it was from until a friend told me that he dropped a sledge hammer on them. Volkl took em back and gave me new ones.
post #7 of 13
Still worth a chat to the mfg.  In these hard times they may want to keep the customer base.  Even if they don't warranty it they may come up with a cost effective solution that meets your needs.  Certainly no harm in trying.  I know many years ago you could get a manufacturer to refurbish a pair of skis (new top sheets, etc) reasonably, but I have no idea if they offer any services at all now.  Being as you only used them 3 times they may take a sympathetic note and assist with some sort of fix for the situation.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post

1) Still worth a chat to the mfg.  In these hard times they may want to keep the customer base... Certainly no harm in trying.  

2) Being as you only used them 3 times they may take a sympathetic note and assist with some sort of fix for the situation.
 

1) no, it's not worth a "chat to the mfg..." the ski is damaged due to impact, not a defect in materials or workmanship. There is no 'chat' involved, there is a shop employee's time on the phone getting an RA#, someone's time removing and storing the bindings, someone's time to package and label the box and a shipping expense. At the distributor (not the manufacturer in most cases) there is someone who must receive the package, inspect the ski, decide what to do, possibly contact the shop for insight into how to proceed, new skis need to be rounded-up and shipped, or the old pair needs to be returned. Shipping, again, must be paid. Once the ski returns to the shop, the customer needs to be contacted and the ski needs to remounted... so yeah, there is some 'harm in trying'. There is also expense for the shop and the distributor.

2) Imagine driving a car into a telephone pole. Imagine driving a brand new car into a telephone pole... is there any real difference? Age of the product just doesn't matter very much.

this is an easy fix. Place the ski on a solid surface, place a flat blade screwdriver against the edge, tap it straight. Ski it as an outside edge.
post #9 of 13
No need to be so negative.  You read what you choose.  I would call the manufacturer and see if an arrangement could be made.  I did not say they would do it for free but that they may be able to work it out with him.  Manufacturers in past offered a service where for $150.00 they would do a kind of refurbish (you could get a new top sheet etc), and this stuff did not involve the ski retailer, only the person sending it to the mfg and getting back by FedEx.  There is no harm in calling and seeing what they can do.  Maybe the industry down here is so different from Canada that this was never done and they don't deal with their customer but I am 45 and have been in the industry for 25 years now as an instructor and held very close relationships to suppliers and retailers.  Thank you for your helpful response to the questioner.  

If I bang my car into a telephone pole the mfg (or dealership for them), is more then happy to set my car back to as good as new so I can use it effectively if it's possible and charge me a nominal fee to do such.  I only state the same for the ski.

And if my car is shown after time tested people have been in accidents to fold up easier then it should, a govt recall is ordered.  That would not happen in skiing.  You truthfully do not know that if the poster were  on a different ski it would have folded and bent in the same situation; that would take an expert to view, test the ski and determine (though I agree that would be far fetched, but never the less, a possibility).  Flaws in material (china steel), a weak area in construction, etc are still a very slim possibilities. 

The poster is not asking for a free ski he asking for a proper fix, maybe there is one that does not involve putting it on the same foot each time he skis and retiring them permanently in a few months.
Edited by lady_Salina - 1/5/10 at 4:52am
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post

No need to be so negative.  You read what you choose.  I would call the manufacturer and see if an arrangement could be made.  I did not say they would do it for free but that they may be able to work it out with him.  Manufacturers in past offered a service where for $150.00 they would do a kind of refurbish (you could get a new top sheet etc), and this stuff did not involve the ski retailer, only the person sending it to the mfg and getting back by FedEx.  There is no harm in calling and seeing what they can do.  Maybe the industry down here is so different from Canada that this was never done and they don't deal with their customer but I am 45 and have been in the industry for 25 years now as an instructor and held very close relationships to suppliers and retailers.  Thank you for your helpful response to the questioner.  

If I bang my car into a telephone pole the mfg (or dealership for them), is more then happy to set my car back to as good as new so I can use it effectively if it's possible and charge me a nominal fee to do such.  I only state the same for the ski.

And if my car is shown after time tested people have been in accidents to fold up easier then it should, a govt recall is ordered.  That would not happen in skiing.  You truthfully do not know that if the poster were  on a different ski it would have folded and bent in the same situation; that would take an expert to view, test the ski and determine (though I agree that would be far fetched, but never the less, a possibility).  Flaws in material (china steel), a weak area in construction, etc are still a very slim possibilities. 

The poster is not asking for a free ski he asking for a proper fix, maybe there is one that does not involve putting it on the same foot each time he skis and retiring them permanently in a few months.
 
he is not reading what he wants, just speaking the truth

the damage on the skis is IMPACT and as such is not a warranty claim, simple repair as described, alternativly have the edge cut and a small patch put in and a replacemtn section of edge seal everything up and use as an outside edge this kind of repair is commonly carried out by a ski shop rather than the manufacturers, they may be able to recomend a shop to do the work but the distributor will not send a ski back to europe to have a patch put in at the manufacturer.... just not commercially viable

this place cracks me up
sometimes
post #11 of 13
I did not see him ask for warranty work or me reply that I felt it would warranty.  Are you reading the same thread as me?  Maybe I misunderstand something?  Chillax wanted to know a fix for it, if it could be done or who.  I suggested contacting the mfg of the ski and asking them their opinion on that for the off chance they had a way to assist.  I did not say they would warranty the ski, but they may find a way to fix it.  My canon camera is currently broken.  I send it to the Canon in Norfolk and they fix it up like new (better imo, then a camera shop).  They charge me a very good price for the service and send it back.  Works great......and they even warranty their repair for 90 days, pretty cool, how a mfg can do that.
post #12 of 13
I had this happen on one of my wife's ski once and straightened similar to Whiteroom's post. Sidewall had some cracking so I had to repair that as well. Worked for me, not sure if I would want to do it if skiing life or death terrain though.

Since ski is so new I don't think it would hurt to do as lady_salina indicated and go to the local shop or manufacturer and plead for mercy (not warranty work). If lucky might get highly discounted new pair, or maybe a break on shop repair. Manufacturers also used to do goodwill replacements with a good single ski from someone else's warranty claim if available, though this probably dosn't happen now due to fear of lawsuits.

Good reason for everyone to develop a relationship with a good local ski shop BTW

Good Luck
post #13 of 13
I have repaired such a "damaged edge"! Major work and it takes some edges from shop repair suppliers!
The trick is to cut off damaged edge at least 3-4 cm. from area IN A BEVELED angle! That is never at 90 degrees to edge but at 45 degrees!
New edge must also be cut at 45 degrees and held with tiny screws (supplied)!
If this damage is near tails or tips,,,,new edge will not hold more than one season!

Other solution is,,,,great rock skis!

Ski Gypsy!
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