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WHAT does it mean to have SKIED a line?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
(This applies primarily to great runs, lines that are narrow or limited in time space conditions in some way.)


It just gripes me. People f'ing up runs they have no business being on. Don't get me wrong. We all have the right to ski anything we want, and for any reason we have. Well, there's the rub. The reason. They are skiing a run, sometimes, just to say they did it, like stuff in a book or guide or magazine they heard of that they need to say they skied. They can't be enjoying it struggling like that. They can't possibly be improving their skiing by skiing like that. They can't even be learning the mountain when they trash part of it like that. They can't be enjoying the company of other skiers they are obstructing and pissing off like that.

.Main problem is, they didn't really SKI IT.

They traversed it.
They stood there for 10 minutes,blocking everyone while looking at it, worrying about it, getting more and more afraid of it..
They stopped before the crux of it.
They flailed and made awfully ugly turns all the way down it.
They Z'd it.
They abused and disrespected it.
They f'n scraped it, chopped and slashed it, ruined it
.
Get it?

If you didn't really ski it, don't brag on whatever it is you did to it, and don't check it off in your ski diary that you skied it. You DIDN'T!             

I know. I know. I know. Mean. Mean. Mean. but if I can point out had badly they are embarassing themselves, maybe they'll learn to ski, then ski it.
post #2 of 12
KT22 got its' name how?

Okay the folks you are complaining about mess up the snow they got the right if they have a ticket.  Think back way back davlari, you probably have a similar time in your skiing; a moment if you will. 

Mine was as 13 years old skied Alyeska for the first time moving from Wisconsin, it may as well have been a different planet.  Stood on top of South Face looking at 2' of heavy crud in flat light and thinking,'how do you do this'.  At 14 cutting 8's, but not that day.  Left a few craters that day, you have to start someplace.

Give em a break.  They swallowed their fear and did it, that counts too.  The turns may come.

I would rather have the fresh tracks too but it just doesn't always work out that way.
post #3 of 12
two more days and they'll all be gone...
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Main problem is, they didn't really SKI IT.

They traversed it.
They stood there for 10 minutes,blocking everyone while looking at it, worrying about it, getting more and more afraid of it..
They stopped before the crux of it.
They flailed and made awfully ugly turns all the way down it.
They Z'd it.
They abused and disrespected it.
They f'n scraped it, chopped and slashed it, ruined it
.
Get it?

If you didn't really ski it, don't brag on whatever it is you did to it, and don't check it off in your ski diary that you skied it. You DIDN'T!             

 

There's a lot of truth in that last paragraph! They didn't actually "SKIED" it

I can forgive those who got there "by accident" because they followed the wrong guys into things they're not ready for. And I think it's a bit harsh to bitch about "ugly turns". There's a lot of gray area between nice elegant S's vs. ugly straight Z's.

For those who got there and realize they're in over their head, they'll just have to swallow their pride and get down. Sometimes, you just don't know until you got there. But make no mistake, they didn't SKI it!

Though I too, wish people don't just "do" a line just so they can say they "skied" it. They DIDN'T

Those notorious "lines" got their notoriety for a reason. "Surviving" it isn't exactly something worth bragging about (well, except to impress those who don't know better).
Edited by at_nyc - 1/2/10 at 2:29pm
post #5 of 12
When I learned how to ski (years ago at the age of 35), I had great fears that I needed to overcome. Getting up there on those hills and going over and over them until I felt I had "conquered" them is how I learned to improve. So what if you don't like it when I stand staring at the hill? Granted I don't stand smack dab in the middle (I'm usually off to the side), but I am formulating my plan of attack and seeing which is the best way down based on my ability. That is how one gains confidence and skill--skiing smart and not just blindly jumping in. It's called skiing SAFE. Every year I have taken a lesson, to the point where I am able to do a double black with confidence. It may not be the prettiest, but as I repeat the run over and over I learn and become smoother and gain confidence. Now I love to do advanced runs on a regular basis, and do the double blacks to challenge myself.

Every year I've convinced my friends to take an advanced lesson or two, and afterwards they're convinced it's the best thing they've ever done. Having an instructor work with us on the lower slopes and then taking us to the steeps, bowls, and crevices is how we learn and improve.

You may not like the fact that I haven't made the best, smoothest, prettiest turns on the slopes, but that's what is called tough luck, pal. You can laugh and point fingers all you want. But please don't crowd and criticize me for trying to advance my skill and ability. With your nasty attitude, all potential great skiers would still be snowplowing on the bunny hills. ENCOURAGING and cheering someone helps make them a better skier. DISCOURAGING and complaining will only make YOU a poor skier by your lack of character and ability to SUPPORT someone in their efforts to CONQUER that run!

So next time you see someone shivering and fearful at the top of a run, why the heck don't you get in there and say "HEY, follow me and I'll show you how FUN it can be!" instead of griping about them? It would make the sport a whole lot better in the LONG RUN (pun intended).
post #6 of 12
BTW: A few years ago I took an intermediate ski friend to the top of Breck off the t-bar--she WANTED and begged to go so incredibly bad....Once there she was breathless and almost pee'd herself as she was so scared--and said YES, I wanted you to bring me here... I talked her through the run with a couple of rest breaks here and there so she could catch her breath (yeah, it was a high altitude and she was mortified) and take in the incredible views, but she did it. She said it was the most awesome place she'd ever been and wanted to do it again. She went back and did it over and over and over...until she conquered her fears and her ability increased 10-fold. After that day, she was pretty much addicted to skiing higher, steeper more challenging runs. She's not an intermediate skier anymore.

It was all thanks to stopping, staring, taking ugly turns. Because she SKIED it.

And I am so proud of her because of it.
post #7 of 12
How bout someone that gives it their best shot,, falls hard, then gets up an negotiates the rest of it?
Say someone drops in to Colbert's and makes a couple of turns but goes down before they totally regain control from the drop.  Then they get up and finish the outrun.  I'd say if they had the stones to drop in to that and really tried to ski out of the landing they deserve the props for going for it, dropping in, then managing it even thought they did eat it
post #8 of 12
it is nice to know that a few people were perfect when they "first skied" they are so lucky!! me I just flail away and try and improve and I hope I don't mess the snow up for the blessed perfect ones.
post #9 of 12
 Yeah davluri, and what pisses me off are all those beginners.  Geez, imagine, they're standing and plowing down a groomer that I could otherwise carve up like sliced meat.  They should stay on the magic carpet and not come off until they're ready.

What's the difference between that ugly thought and yours?

Sheesh. 
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by e-ski View Post

When I learned how to ski (years ago at the age of 35), I had great fears that I needed to overcome. Getting up there on those hills and going over and over them until I felt I had "conquered" them is how I learned to improve. So what if you don't like it when I stand staring at the hill? Granted I don't stand smack dab in the middle (I'm usually off to the side), but I am formulating my plan of attack and seeing which is the best way down based on my ability. That is how one gains confidence and skill--skiing smart and not just blindly jumping in. It's called skiing SAFE. Every year I have taken a lesson, to the point where I am able to do a double black with confidence. It may not be the prettiest, but as I repeat the run over and over I learn and become smoother and gain confidence. Now I love to do advanced runs on a regular basis, and do the double blacks to challenge myself.

Every year I've convinced my friends to take an advanced lesson or two, and afterwards they're convinced it's the best thing they've ever done. Having an instructor work with us on the lower slopes and then taking us to the steeps, bowls, and crevices is how we learn and improve.

You may not like the fact that I haven't made the best, smoothest, prettiest turns on the slopes, but that's what is called tough luck, pal. You can laugh and point fingers all you want. But please don't crowd and criticize me for trying to advance my skill and ability. With your nasty attitude, all potential great skiers would still be snowplowing on the bunny hills. ENCOURAGING and cheering someone helps make them a better skier. DISCOURAGING and complaining will only make YOU a poor skier by your lack of character and ability to SUPPORT someone in their efforts to CONQUER that run!

So next time you see someone shivering and fearful at the top of a run, why the heck don't you get in there and say "HEY, follow me and I'll show you how FUN it can be!" instead of griping about them? It would make the sport a whole lot better in the LONG RUN (pun intended).
Nice post e-ski, You are right and thanks for helping to expand the sport to others, especially nice that you get friends to take a lesson or 2. This is one way to grow the sport, looking at movies, magazines, yakking on the web is nice but getting out there and doing is the way. Keep at it. Good work with your friend at Breck.
post #11 of 12
Me thinks this was a troll
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
I promised myself I wouldn't even look back at this thread, and here I am.
I have no gripe with any of you or anyone learning to ski.  Apologies if you feel insulted or disregarded.
I have a problem with people not sharing time and space fairly because they have some major agenda to fullfill.
And when I hear people bragging how they skied something when they flailed the thing, I have to smile (inwardly)
AND, I have never been rude to anyone on the hill, quite the opposite.
Oh, well, I did know better.
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