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What is the point of wearing new boots around the house?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Daft question but serious too :)

When you get new boots it seems you're supposed to wear them around the house for a bit.

Why?

Am I supposed to be identifying pressure points ?
Or letting the liners compress/adjust to my feet a bit ?

And what am I supposed to do?
Stand in them? Flex? Sleep?
(I tried some dancing on new years eve but it was quite noisy)

Should I be keeping them on for 8hrs straight even if my feet stop tingling and go limp? Or should it be for an hour at a time?

If I sit in them whilst I work or watch TV (ie with no weight) I have noticed that my feet begin to tingle and I think the circulation is a bit cut off. If I then get up and "adopt the stance", the blood starts to flow and the pressure on the top of my foot goes away.

I think this is a good sign but I'm glad I'm not in an office.

What do I do if there's a pressure spot?
On the first day? (I guess "grin and bear it")
After 3 days? (Should I call my fitter or should I just call him names and wait until I've skied in them?)

I'm sure it's not exactly critical but maybe there's some useful snippets...
I'll post this in gear too but I'd like to hear what the professionals think.
post #2 of 8
 Wearing them around the house will help get your feet accustomed to compression again if you have been in sandals all summer and also help with some break in. It can also be useful in finding pressure points in a new boot. But I would probably only do it if I couldn't go skiing which will do all of the above only quicker.
post #3 of 8
if you are wearing your new boots around the house you may be daft as you implied or just very gullible.

there is close to zero benefit from wearing your new unskied boots around the house. wearing your unskied new boots around the house will have you back in the ski shop  asking for boot modifications that more than likely are not needed.

the task of a good fitter is to get you properly assessed and properly fit so that you are ok to get to the task of skiing. from the skiing, and only from the skiing will you be able to figure out whether you are going to need more work, less work, or no work.

here's the typical scenario; you buy the boot, go home, put the boot on in your living room, sit down and watch TV. no force, no leverage, no frickin chance that any break in is going to take place. break in occurs in the liner of the boot, when enough force is transmitted into the liner of the boot to compress the fit fit foam or flo material. those forces are best generated while skiing.

so, just in case the the same idiot that suggested that you wear your boots at home to break them in, suggests that you put on your new boots, get in a really hot shower, then wear them to bed.......that is probably not a good idea either.

by the way, i own a bridge that connects the island of manhattan, to the rest of the world that i would be willing to sell to you at a very low price based on the current economic climate in the usa.

jim
post #4 of 8
 

In the idea situation everyone would have a great ski shop with excellent boot fitters that took the time to fit your ski boots, make the initial adjustments and get you ready for the ski slopes, but that is not always the case. Also, some people do not live close to ski a area where they can make an easy trip to the hill to check out how their boots fit. If this is the case, trying on your boots at home is not a bad idea.


 

Dido with what Screamindoggies said. My feeling is about 20-30 minutes standing – not sitting on the couch drinking a beer or watching TV – is adequate. Stand up flexing the boots, with some side to side edging will give you an idea how they fit, it will not break in the boots but can give you an idea of what could be problem areas. It also gives you time to work through the buckle system and micro-adjustments so when you are up at the hill and all your buddies are dying to hit the slopes, you are not holding up the group.


 

As Starthouse mentioned, if you have a little discomfort do not jump in your car and rush back to the ski shop, there is nothing like a day on the hill before really coming to conclusions about how the boots are fitting.


 

Boot fitting is a process and the customer needs to become knowledgeable and familiar with how a ski boots should fit, which is not always clear and easy to know for all people.


 

Don

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
@jim ... does that bridge have pretty lights on it

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strolz_Boot_Guy View Post
 

In the idea situation everyone would have a great ski shop with excellent boot fitters that took the time to fit your ski boots, make the initial adjustments and get you ready for the ski slopes, but that is not always the case. Also, some people do not live close to ski a area where they can make an easy trip to the hill to check out how their boots fit. If this is the case, trying on your boots at home is not a bad idea.

Correct. I bought the boots here in the UK (from CEM so I've done the best I can to make sure point 1 is covered!). I'll be coming out to the ESA for what may be my only ski-trip of the year and if I have a fit problem then it's a tad difficult to get back to Oxford...
Hence this post to cover off point 2.
Quote:
Dido with what Screamindoggies said. My feeling is about 20-30 minutes standing – not sitting on the couch drinking a beer or watching TV – is adequate. Stand up flexing the boots, with some side to side edging will give you an idea how they fit, it will not break in the boots but can give you an idea of what could be problem areas. It also gives you time to work through the buckle system and micro-adjustments so when you are up at the hill and all your buddies are dying to hit the slopes, you are not holding up the group.
Well, by now it's been several hours over 3 days. Walking, flexing, edging to try and recall some of the skiing movement and see if there are any issues.
Yes, I played with the buckles - I had my old boots clamped down fairly hard to compensate for the loose fit. These fit snugly all over even without the buckles done up so they only need the lightest tension.
Quote:

As Starthouse mentioned, if you have a little discomfort do not jump in your car and rush back to the ski shop, there is nothing like a day on the hill before really coming to conclusions about how the boots are fitting.

I do have some pain in my (larger) left foot on the bone where the lower-rear buckle sits. It feels a little 'bruised'. I can also feel compression pressure along the little toe edge. The right foot is tight but feels fine. Both my calves feel a bit bruised/tender. Nothing I'm too worried about.

The way I relieve the (minor) pain is to stand in the boots and flex forward; that seems to cause my foot to 'collapse' a little and the pressure goes away - that's enough to suggest that it won't be an issue when I'm on the slopes.

I am slightly nervous about the left foot though - in the past I've had arch pain that has left me unable to stand and has really reduced my skiing pleasure.

Quote:

Boot fitting is a process and the customer needs to become knowledgeable and familiar with how a ski boots should fit, which is not always clear and easy to know for all people. 

Correct.
This is my second pair of boots - ever. The first pair did me good service as a beginner and have only had about 11 weeks of use.

I honestly didn't know what responses to expect - I'm not surprised by it but I wouldn't have been surprised if you'd said that I should wear them for 8 hours a day for a week - that's why I'm asking :)
post #6 of 8
as the guys have said you are only looking to wear them standing for 20-30 mins at a time...... all you are looking for is to let the foot get used to being compressed a bit rather than in the relaxed fit of your day to day shoes, alos to make sure there are no major pressure points.....from what tyou have described i would stop analysing and start packing for your big trip, all sounds about normal form a new boot, it will as i said take a few days of skiing to settle done.

 you have had time to spend these several hours in them...Why didn't you just pop out to the alps for a cheeky weekend
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by lbt View Post


Yes, I played with the buckles - I had my old boots clamped down fairly hard to compensate for the loose fit. "These fit snugly all over even without the buckles done up so they only need the lightest tension".




Just a foot note about buckles----I would suggest you tighten the buckle around your ankle(second from top) to the point that it starts to hurt---then back off a little to the point where it is as tight as you can stand, but comfortable.  This will hold you and the liner in the rear of the shell and you won't bump your toes by having the liner slide forward.

Happy New Year.
post #8 of 8
as you are in the UK, and not close to snow, this is a slightly different dynamic. in the shop the goal of the fitter is to make a good selection and get the fit close enough so that you can get out on the mountain to ski. the experience in the shop is guided. with the help of a fitter you are shown how to get in the boot, how to make sure that the foot is settled into the back of the liner, how to buckle the boot so that the toes are pulled back and away from the front of the boot.

my experience with skiers that need that guidance has been that as soon as they go home and try the boots on, they miss all the subtle guidance that they received in the shop. the common effect is that the skier does not get the foot settled into the boot properly and guide themselves into the fear of buyers remorse.

if thay were to simply go skiing, the foot via the leverage that the ski provides would start to naturally settle into the boot. with one caveat, which is the boot needs to be properly buckled to limit the moving target inside the boot. it is also common for the first day or 10 to keep the boot buckled tight for skiing, and release the buckles while riding the lift.

to the op, find out what you have in terms of fit by skiing. your fitter will deal with outcome, bad or good when you return. thats what good boot fitters do.

jim
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