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Have you ever been injured? a poll

Poll Results: What is your history of injury?

Poll expired: Jan 4, 2010 This is a multiple choice poll
  • 11% of voters (9)
    never injured
  • 11% of voters (9)
    10 years no injury
  • 7% of voters (6)
    5 years no injury
  • 7% of voters (6)
    Last season to this, clean.
  • 3% of voters (3)
    injured somewhat every season
  • 2% of voters (2)
    injured so much or so seriously that my skiing progress is impeeded
  • 25% of voters (21)
    leg (injured at some time)
  • 12% of voters (10)
    shoulder
  • 8% of voters (7)
    back
  • 9% of voters (8)
    concussion
81 Total Votes  
post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Do you consider it important to avoid / prevent injury?
In your experience, can injuries heal completely?
What measures do you take to avoid being injured?
Do most racers sustain injury? Do they return to their former level>
post #2 of 29
 Sorry, but this is a confusing poll.
I am not injured most years, but I was last year.
Never anything too serious -- over many years I've only had:  dislocated thumb, broken tailbone, major bruise to the calf.
Each took about one year to heal completely, but got to the "usually forget about it" stage in about a month or so.
Talking to other friends (injured skiing or otherwise) my one-year pattern seems pretty typical.
post #3 of 29
Danggit.  

mdf
gets an implicit  'FLAWED!' in before I can even hit the explicit 'Enter' key.

Well done, sir.
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
apolgies. there is nothing for: this season, so far so good! last season to this is close. Does flawed indicate that there is no response that fits your history? guess that's a problem, but some of it could be informative. hope.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

 Sorry, but this is a confusing poll.
I am not injured most years, but I was last year.
Never anything too serious -- over many years I've only had:  dislocated thumb, broken tailbone, major bruise to the calf.
Each took about one year to heal completely, but got to the "usually forget about it" stage in about a month or so.
Talking to other friends (injured skiing or otherwise) my one-year pattern seems pretty typical.
post #5 of 29
Yes.  You need to add a Flawed option.

Broken wrist one year, possible broken thumb last season (didn't want to spend 15 hrs in emergency to hear, "It's broken; don't use it for a while."), odd sprains here and there, Felt a little woozy after one crash many years ago(don't think I hit my head; no blood and I regained conciousness before I came back to earth with skis still attached, but who knows what what happened in the intervening seconds).
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Yes.  You need to add a Flawed option.

Broken wrist one year, possible broken thumb last season (didn't want to spend 15 hrs in emergency to hear, "It's broken; don't use it for a while."), odd sprains here and there, Felt a little woozy after one crash many years ago(don't think I hit my head; no blood and I regained conciousness before I came back to earth with skis still attached, but who knows what what happened in the intervening seconds).


 

I think that qualifies as a concussion. we don't always have blood running out of our ears and nose.

can't get back in to edit a poll. write in's may cover the inadequacy as far as information goes, if not distribution.
post #7 of 29

Injured more things than I care to remember, most of them long ago thank goodness.

  An ankle in the gates.  Shoulders once off a kicker, twice in the bumps, once in the trees.  Wrist learning helicopters (the extra weight really made throwing them easier), a plaster cast was good for 7 days skiing.  Back hit hard from above, and a cliff.  Head many ways many times (run away straps bad). Bent a knee sideways skiing with the Dyastar pro racing team long ago messed it ALL up, never fully healed from that one.  Ribs a rack or two (most embarrassing on a cat track).  There were others but the head injuries make it hard to remember.

Way more injuries from pre release than non release.  If you race hard someday you will be injured.  Your injuries are milder and heal faster if you are in good condition.  Did not take a year to heal normally, some just weeks.  You heal slower as you get older. 

My orthopod became a good Friend and hunting buddy.  Tough way to meet people.

post #8 of 29
 I started skiing in 1944 when I was 5 years old and though I've bruised myself numerous times, I've never been "injured" in the sense of broken bones or anything that caused me to not ski for a day. (Obviously I'm not a racer, though I have always skied intensely.)

I remember skiing at Franconia Notch/.Canon Mt. in New Hampshire in the 50's. It seems that every year I'd take a long fall on an icy portion of the Middle Canon trail and slide on the blue ice for a hundred feet or so and turn my hip black and blue. One year it would be my right hip and I would re-burise it numerous times during the season and the next year my left hip would get the treatment.

What I also know is that learning to fall in skiing probably saved my life in a motorcycle accident later on and saved me from injury on more than a few other occasions; that ability to fall, but not panic and to ride the fall loose, active and alert.

I love how skiing falls teaches children that falling isn't a tragedy which is a great lesson for the challenges of life, relationships and business. I can get up and continue on my intended course!
post #9 of 29
I'm kind of like Stranger...

I've been injured many times in the last 40 years of skiing but nothing significant in about ten years, which either means I'm finally improving a little OR I've just become a less-adventurous weenie and don't push things like I used to.

I've done a shoulder, a wrist (that one was snowboarding), a knee (ACL), a tib/fib, a gamekeeper's thumb, and a compressed vertebra.

All of which is partly responsible for how I feel when I get up every day.
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
chronologically, to the best of my memory, given the concussions:
1963  knee sprain
1965  shoulder separation (now chronic)
2004  bruised rib
2007 hyper extension knee
2007 concussion, mild
2008 generally pummeled all over
post #11 of 29
Over contracted right knee first day out this year. Still having some slight issues with it.
post #12 of 29
How do you define injury? An incident that takes you out for the season or requires a visit to the ER? If so, then I have never been injured.

Just tweaks, bumps, burises, etc. I sprained/hyperextended my thumb a couple times . The closest I came to tearing up a knee was actually during a snowboarding lesson and having my attached leg twist 180 degrees while I fell down in a sitting position getting off a lift. The closest to a any signifigant skiing injury actually happened while sliding to the lift line. Snowboarder lost control and slid into me and I slipped backwards and wacked my head hard enough to see stars and be foggy for about thirty seconds. I started wearing a helmet after that.

Every year, everyone gets mild injuries like dings, brusises, tweaks, or even sprains they don't know they incurred, etc..Falling down and getting bumps and bruises is part of skiing.

As far as thinking it is important to avoid injury, of course. But you can't rule out getting injured no matter what you do or what measures you take. Last week I was skiing HV and came accross a girl, maybe 13, who was lying in the snow crying that her knee hurt. She said she hear a loud crack. Waited with her while someone went to get patrol. You can get popped your first day skiing, even on beginner skis at DIN 3.  

 Attaching planks to your feet and gliding down a hill covered with snow, trees, and other obstacles will never be classified as a safety-oreinted activity. I always looked at injury potential in skiing as a calcuated risk. Each indiivudal has to decide how much risk is too much.

Also, regarding the question, 'What measures do you take to avoid being injured?'

I try not to think about it, really, because that's when I ski tense. I figured if it ever gets to the point where I am too woried about getting injured, it's time to take up something else. WIth that being said, I do some things like wear a helmet, concentrate on skiing with good form(relatively speaking) more than just going fast for the sake of going fast or hot-dogging, etc.. When you are young you feel invulnerable and just let all inhibitions go, Once you get near fourty, your mindset becomes much more conservative and you look at things differently; For me, at least. Runs that were clearly beyond my ability to navigate with good form would be hit without a thought when I was younger. Now, I think, 'what's the pioint? I'l just be sliding and scraping my way to the bottom like a wounded chicken on stilts. Not my idea of fun.' I reached a comfort level where I can just ski for the sake of skiing. I am at the point where I have no real desire to keep pushing the envelope more and more.  I am kind of where I would like to be. Skiing has become a lot more fun when I don't feel I always have to challenge myself and can conentrate on improving my technique. I don't think the two are neccesarily mutual requirements for improvement. That keeps me safer, I guess.
Edited by MojoMan - 12/31/09 at 12:27pm
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

How do you define injury?
Good question.  If an injury is something that forces you to waste the rest of your lift ticket and stop skiing for the rest of the day, I've never been injured either. 
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

I've been injured many times in the last 40 years of skiing but nothing significant in about ten years, which either means I'm finally improving a little OR I've just become a less-adventurous weenie and don't push things like I used to.
 

Yup, that's me too.  Maybe some luck involved too.  About the same number of years (35), but a lot less ski days.  Proud to be a weenie without a limp.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post



Good question.  If an injury is something that forces you to waste the rest of your lift ticket and stop skiing for the rest of the day, I've never been injured either. 
 

Good point!  Most significant injury I ever had was getting whacked in the face by my own K2 Comp 610 swinging from the strap around my ankle in '79.  I got a bandaid from the Ski Patrol, and skied without goggles or prescription glasses the rest of the day.  Hyperextended my thumb the same day trying to pop the back binding up - that still gives me trouble.  But if you can still make it to last chair, are you really injured?
post #15 of 29
I was JSA and I tripped, the ski opened a gash on my leg.

uggh.
post #16 of 29
At 70 I ski as fast as I ever did, but I am a much better skier, so I rarely fall. I also have a mindset that it is not OK to injure myself and though I ski fast, I am not pushing my envelope.

Our ski equipment is so much better today that the injuries which we took for granted as almost probable when skiing in the 50's and 60's, like broken legs, are rare today. It would be interesting to see the statistics of the types of accidents that have happened over the years.

Re: What measures do you take to avoid being injured?
I have the mindset of someone who is not accident prone, I got a helmet this year, I keep my bindings tuned, I ski to the limit of my limits and I pay attention to others.
post #17 of 29
Me and my family first time skied a few years ago, my dad got into the skiis, and being from another country where bindings and shoes were completely different, old, and non-preventive, he thought he could ski a little, so he took his first few steps, voila... 20 feet from the lodge entrance he slid down the hill spread his legs and somehow twisted his knee. Never been back on the skis ever since, LOL.

Me, I never really had a ski injury, I've only skied on rentals, and probably skied no more than 20 days total for the last 3 years or so.
This season I'd like to buy my own equipment for the next season, probably boots first, maybe poles second (I'm 6' 5.5" and I think I'm somewhere between 54"-56" poles, too bad they barely make them this tall :( ) and skis maybe last. I've just started research on buying my own equipment, and there's still a lot of questions.

I've heard that companies have shows at universities and sell off their last season stocks, too bad I'm not close to a ski resort. I live in Bay Area, California and ski at Tahoe Nevada, mostly I like at the Mt. Rose Ski Resort, went to Boreal Ski Resort a few times, they didn't have my size ski poles :( So, anyway, it'd be great if I could buy some skis at such a show for a much needed reduced price (I'm a college student), but I just don't know how, when, where, and even if I could make it so far away just for a show/sell_off event.
post #18 of 29
Well, I checked a lot of stuff.  How do you indicate you skied for 36 years without an injury and then you broke two wrists?  There wasn't even an "other" category....
post #19 of 29
 Most my injuries are non-skiing related. Skied with a separated shoulder and completely messed up wrist (too many things wrong with it to list) last week. Three years ago it was a slipped disc that I re-aggravated skiing. I've hit my head hard skiing, but I can't say it was or was not a concussion. 
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Do you consider it important to avoid / prevent injury?
Yes, I don't get much PTO and don't want to waste it NOT skiing.
In your experience, can injuries heal completely?
Most yes, some definately not.
What measures do you take to avoid being injured?
First, I try ti get in better shape before day one.  I warm up and stretch efore skiing..
I don't og as big as I used to when I didn't have a family depending on my ability to earn income.
Lastly, I quit when my legs start to feel noodky.
Do most racers sustain injury? Do they return to their former level>
Competing (all disciplines) greatly increases one's odds of pushing beyond the capabilities of person and/or gear.
 

I've been increadibly lucky through 30 + years all over the country, some competitive.  I've had a few busted thumbs from breaking falls, one torn up back that only kept me off skis for about 10 days, and just lots of little things like blruises, blood, and minor sprains and strains
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Well, I checked a lot of stuff.  How do you indicate you skied for 36 years without an injury and then you broke two wrists?  There wasn't even an "other" category....
 

thanks, I guess you just did the only way possible. I should have taken statistics in school, but who knew?
did you break them both at once? that could be limiting.
post #22 of 29
Slammed into a tree at high speed.  Tried to prevent major damage to my brain by putting my hands up (I'm guessing).  Cracked my helmet, but not my skull.  Left hand was dangling off my arm.  Total mess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post




thanks, I guess you just did the only way possible. I should have taken statistics in school, but who knew?
did you break them both at once? that could be limiting.
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
That's horrible.
As you said, that hadn't happened for 36 years. What was different this time around? Not idle curiosity, I try to learn from what happens, to me and to other skiers, to use in life (skiing), it's real knowlege.

The very first time I skied trees, around 1966 at Mt. Baldy, I was about to slam into a tree and put out my arm. It pushed my arm right out of the socket, the arm that was already separated the year before in a superman style fall in glacial sun pits. My arm went in to the shoulder and then the body flipped forward past my arm. separated right there on the Mt. Hood glacier, by myself, late afternoon, foggy. I jumped up and down and it shook back in. lucky there. It has been prone to separation since then, and has partially separated maybe 30 times in my life since then.
post #24 of 29
I fractured my wrist, but to have it hanging there....I shivered just reading that

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Slammed into a tree at high speed.  Tried to prevent major damage to my brain by putting my hands up (I'm guessing).  Cracked my helmet, but not my skull.  Left hand was dangling off my arm.  Total mess.
 


 
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Do you consider it important to avoid / prevent injury?

Absolutely! Downtime is bad, health expenses are worse.

In your experience, can injuries heal completely?

Yes. I compressed vertebrae and although they are still compressed they are stable and I've had no repercussions. Sorta. My knees have both had ACL reconstruction and I trust them but I don't think they are as resilient as they used to be.

What measures do you take to avoid being injured?

I have to say it: helmet. I have watched too many good people (mostly racers admittedly) have head injuries that have caused them life long issues. Stay strong and healthy as well as limber.

Do most racers sustain injury? Do they return to their former level>

Yes. Generally the injury itself doesn't prevent return to previous performance, rather the brain says 'slow down, don't do that again'. Many I've seen exceed previous levels as their rehab gives them an opportunity to improve their strength.
 
post #26 of 29
I didn't really like the poll choices, but.....

Left frozen shoulder 1986 at Boyne Mtn
Right ACL 1985 at Caberfae Peaks
Left Acetabulum and Ischial crack (pelvis fracture) 2009 at Crystal Mtn (got blindsided by a snowboarder jumping out of a closed, blind area into a trail. He spun me around and slammed me into the lift power box and water spigot surround).
post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
MR

Picaboo Street comes to mind. she was one of the bravest racers in the WC. really raised the level, even among the euro powerhouse nation girls. That was the stage where she had the tiger painted on her helmet, and all that that meant.

Then she had a horrific fall in a downhill and rehabed her body, but her mind or soul seemed to have a doubt it never did before. For me her career is one of the most heroic in the sport.
post #28 of 29
Nothing really.  It was a fine spring day.  I went flying over a section I'd been over twice before that day.  Only, this time a root/rock or something I don't know what snagged my right ski (spring conditions).  All I remember was feeling something, cursing, and it was at a point that I needed to be heading right as that was the direction the trail went.  But, I couldn't recover and went off the trail, slammed into the tree, ricocheted off it, then went sailing over a pile of logs.  Next thing I know I was being put on a back board.  Whatever happened, the binding toe piece was torn right out of the ski diagonally, either as part of the fall or during the ensuing slamming around, I don't know.  Helmet was cracked.  I keep it around over my tuning bench, complete with the dried blood to remind me not to be an ass when it comes to speed.  Because no matter what the trail is rated, no matter how many years you've been skiing, no matter how many days you've been out this year, it could happen to you. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

That's horrible.
As you said, that hadn't happened for 36 years. What was different this time around?
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Nothing really.  It was a fine spring day.  I went flying over a section I'd been over twice before that day.  Only, this time a root/rock or something I don't know what snagged my right ski (spring conditions).  All I remember was feeling something, cursing, and it was at a point that I needed to be heading right as that was the direction the trail went.  But, I couldn't recover and went off the trail, slammed into the tree, ricocheted off it, then went sailing over a pile of logs.  Next thing I know I was being put on a back board.  Whatever happened, the binding toe piece was torn right out of the ski diagonally, either as part of the fall or during the ensuing slamming around, I don't know.  Helmet was cracked.  I keep it around over my tuning bench, complete with the dried blood to remind me not to be an ass when it comes to speed.  Because no matter what the trail is rated, no matter how many years you've been skiing, no matter how many days you've been out this year, it could happen to you. 

 


 


you describe skiing very vividly, scarily  . THAT was a pretty violent fall. Rotting spring snow maybe. . We had similar issues earier this year as people were impatient to really ski, but coverage was very thin, stumps, branches and rocks everywhere. as they say, skiing difficulty is condition based.
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