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Using Ski Poles in Snowboarding - Page 2

post #31 of 50

I don't know about the flats, but I saw a boarder borrow his skier friend's poles to go through the moguls. They definitely helped him pivot faster.

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by unsunken View Post
 

I don't know about the flats, but I saw a boarder borrow his skier friend's poles to go through the moguls. They definitely helped him pivot faster.

 

I'm happy to lend my poles to a boarding friend on the flats because I can skate along relatively painlessly, but no way is he getting my poles in the bumps.  If he wants them there he better bring his own.

post #33 of 50

I will admit I have been afraid to click on this thread since I feared its contents.  At heart, I share some of killcimbz thoughts, but I would say them a bit differently.

 

That said, I do have a quibble with the mechanics of riding with poles, as your body is rotated out of alignment.  I think you can get success up to an intermediate level with poles, but it will inhibit progression for most to any advanced level.  This is something why I try to coach out of a lot of converting skiers early on - stop "riding like a skier." It will create problems creating enough pressure on your toes to be able to put out a high intensity toe turn (say a big carve). Not saying it can't be done, but just that it will be much harder.

 

To illustrate on flatland, stand up and pretend you are going down the hill. (go ahead, try it now)

- Now turn your shoulders 90 degrees like you have poles.  

- Try and put pressure on your front toe, ankle and knee to initiate a toe side turn with your body corked/riding with poles

- Now align your shoulders with the body and make that same front ankle, knee move.

- Compare the two and I will bet the aligned, non-corked, non-poled stance feels better.

 

Comments?

post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebuilder View Post
 

I think I undersatnd from everyones comments that a pole or poles during the down hill isn't that useful.  When I was skiing this past season and talking to several snowboarders on lifts about runs that I had taken, they said they liked them as well but the runout at the end was too much of a pain for them.  They indicated that it would be great if they had some type of pole that they could pop out to push through the flats.  Is this a widely held desire among snowboarders?  Is having a single pole functional in the flats?  Assume that there was a great way to retract/expand and store it.

.... 


Edited by deagol - 3/25/14 at 8:30pm
post #35 of 50
I'm a skier, but have been trying out snowboarding for the last few years. I often go boarding with my Dad, who is a skier and I have just discovered this! We got stuck on a long flat trail when we were in Japan recently and I borrowed a pole to push me along. It worked really well! I don't think I could ever use them all the time while snowboarding, but it was so much faster than skating along the flat sections, and much less work.
post #36 of 50

Hi Folks,

 

I've been skiing since 1978, snowboarding since 1997.

 

I have a big stiff carving board (Burton Frontier 166), I have it almost like an alpine setup.  I practically lie down when carving big turns.  For this board the poles just get in the way.

 

But when I am on my "little board" (some old Burton Custom), especially when I'm out with skiers, I always bring poles.  

 

I can get going off the lift and keep up with skiiers.  Snowboarders can be so slow to get going.   Then I don't have to sit down when I stop.  I can stand up and talk to the skiers rather than being on my butt.   Then I can propel myself along on the flats.  No hopping.   Definitely no taking one foot out.  Finally, I'm not a one footed klutz in the lift lines.

 

I agree they would get in the way once you get going, if you have a sideways stance.  But I have a forward stance, and on my "little board" I spend a lot of time on "ski trails" in the bumps, etc.  Mostly facing forwards.   I find in the bumps, and navigation really tight turns in the tress, planting a pole to initiate the turn does wonders.  

 

Anyone who criticizes poles should spend a season carrying a pair round.   At some point in the year you will say "Holy crap I'm so glad I have these".  And you'll also get frustrated waiting for the snowboarders who don't have them.  You'll realize you spend half the day waiting for them to put the foot in, take it out, put it in, take it out, hop around, fall over, sit down... man you snowboarders without poles are SOOO slow it's unbearable ;)

 

I tried the telescoping poles but they broker real quick.  I just like plain old ski poles.

 

CONs to using poles.   1.  It's something extra to carry.   2.  Every goddam person asks you why you have them and it gets annoying.   3. If you think they are "messing up" your body position then hold them in one hand and don't use them until you get to the flats.   But that's not really true, it's just a DIFFERENT style of riding there is no "right or wrong".

 

Anyways doesn't really matter to me if you use them or don't.   I like 'em and I think it's worth carrying a pair around with me.  I can ride with or without them, i can ski with or without poles too by the way.  With is better.

 

- R

post #37 of 50

I just saw this thread.   First let me say I love snowboarding and this isn't a knock at all.  I boarded for 7 years and then switched to skiing because I'd never done it and all my friends skied.  Since skiing I've become a bit lazy and realized at least to me how much more work snowboarding is and how important ski poles are lol.

 

I didn't realize how much easier skiing had gotten for me until I tried to snowboard again last season.  I was quickly reminded though that it sucks when you have a flat part to go through and you have to maintain the edge and ride your toes to get through it and hope you don't wipe.  Its also a pain if you lose speed to have to hop your way down.  Then there's the fun part of when you fall, flipping around and pushing up with your arms is quite tiring lol.

 

I realized skiing is easy for me because you are flat on your skis and you have really long shoes on so because your feet are separated so its very easy to maneuver around and still be upright as there's no balance to maintain.  Stopping is an easy snowplow sideways.  if you get in a flat spot you can pole.  Since you are flat on your skis that are separated you are never at an awkward angle to have your board catch an edge and you get pile drivin into the ground that can happen while snowboarding.

 

I realized this when I rented a board last year.  Not knocking snowboarding at all cause I love it but I struggled a bit last year and I realized that I'd gotten so used to skiing, having separate feet and poles to maneuver that it was way easier for me.

 

However, I realized I still love snowboarding and want to make it work somehow.  I realized that poles while boarding might just be the ticket to bring the easiness I've achieved with skiing back to boarding.  I actually saw a guy snowboarding with poles last year and I suddenly as I'm gearing up for winter realized that hey maybe there's some logic to that.

 

When you fall, you flip yourself to your knees and instead of using your arms pushing into the snow to push yourself up you use the poles to push yourself up so its easier................. When you get into a flat spot its less of a pain in the arse because you can pole your way through

Poles can also be used when you spin around on your toes to stop and then you plant your poles to steady yourself.so you don't have to worry about holding as strong of an edge to maintain being vertical lol.

 

I am stoked and will be trying this next time.

post #38 of 50

We need to get ^you to try teleboards :)  

 

http://www.telemarkdown.com/store/teleboards/

post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

We need to get ^you to try teleboards :)

 

http://www.telemarkdown.com/store/teleboards/

What is the difference between teleboards and a traditional alpine ski?   :).    I will eventually buy a used snowboard set up and screw around now and again, with or without the pole.  Its all fun nonetheless.

post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfsnowgirl View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

We need to get ^you to try teleboards :)

 

http://www.telemarkdown.com/store/teleboards/

What is the difference between teleboards and a traditional alpine ski?   :).    I will eventually buy a used snowboard set up and screw around now and again, with or without the pole.  Its all fun nonetheless.

 

 

Well, there is only one surface and two edges to start with...sort of like a monoski except narrower and mounted fore-and-aft. 

post #41 of 50

Hmmmm ok.  I am usually down with trying new things so I guess I can't rule it out but I LOVE my alpine skis so I think I'll stick with those for now and will most likely snowboard once in a while.   Looking at a GNU B-Pro ladies snowboard.  Getting ready to upgrade my skis this winter so that's enough gear for me for now.

post #42 of 50

I can prove you are wrong about riding with poles, I've skied & boarded all over the globe with poles for 25 years, while heliskiing in New Zealand the guide told me I had the best of both worlds & could maneuver in all conditions better than any snowboarder or skier he had ever seen because of my poles, patrollers at (to many to list) resorts have told me I make them jealous of my style in powder riding with poles, ski guides in Chamonix have been impressed with my ability to keep up with (and pass them in the flats) with poles, I have a forward alpine carve stance on my board & they help me to get upright quickly & easily after a fall in deep powder, I can use them to help pull up other riders in difficult or flat terrain. They never hinder my riding & I do a lot of split boarding & never have to strap them to my pack. At resorts I don't have to stop & unstrap my back foot in the lifeline & stop again at the top to strap back in.  There are a few enlightened skiers I also ski with who have used poles as well to the same advantage when they snowboard who can't believe more crossover skiers haven't discovered the advantages of riding with poles. Obviously, riding the park & pipe they aren't of much use but I don't ride park & pipe. Don't knock it if you haven't tried it & it does take some adjustments to your style but in deep powder many people think I'm a skier until they look closer to see I'm riding a board.

post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by 198 cm Doughboy View Post
 

I can prove you are wrong about riding with poles, I've skied & boarded all over the globe with poles for 25 years, while heliskiing in New Zealand the guide told me I had the best of both worlds & could maneuver in all conditions better than any snowboarder or skier he had ever seen because of my poles, patrollers at (to many to list) resorts have told me I make them jealous of my style in powder riding with poles, ski guides in Chamonix have been impressed with my ability to keep up with (and pass them in the flats) with poles, I have a forward alpine carve stance on my board & they help me to get upright quickly & easily after a fall in deep powder, I can use them to help pull up other riders in difficult or flat terrain. They never hinder my riding & I do a lot of split boarding & never have to strap them to my pack. At resorts I don't have to stop & unstrap my back foot in the lifeline & stop again at the top to strap back in.  There are a few enlightened skiers I also ski with who have used poles as well to the same advantage when they snowboard who can't believe more crossover skiers haven't discovered the advantages of riding with poles. Obviously, riding the park & pipe they aren't of much use but I don't ride park & pipe. Don't knock it if you haven't tried it & it does take some adjustments to your style but in deep powder many people think I'm a skier until they look closer to see I'm riding a board.

 

Thank you for this post.   I am thinking about picking up another board cause I miss it at times and I will totally bring ski poles with me. I totally wasn't knocking it so please don't think I was.  I am pro using poles.  I just can't think they wouldn't be helpful.  Especially when you spin around on your front edge, just plant those poles once you spin around and bada bing, nice steady stance while you kibitz with your mates or take a picture or wait for someone (whatever your reason for stopping).   Do you just hold your poles gently in front while you are carving your way down the mountain?

post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelwma View Post

I will admit I have been afraid to click on this thread since I feared its contents.  At heart, I share some of killcimbz thoughts, but I would say them a bit differently.

That said, I do have a quibble with the mechanics of riding with poles, as your body is rotated out of alignment.  I think you can get success up to an intermediate level with poles, but it will inhibit progression for most to any advanced level.  This is something why I try to coach out of a lot of converting skiers early on - stop "riding like a skier." It will create problems creating enough pressure on your toes to be able to put out a high intensity toe turn (say a big carve). Not saying it can't be done, but just that it will be much harder.

To illustrate on flatland, stand up and pretend you are going down the hill. (go ahead, try it now)
- Now turn your shoulders 90 degrees like you have poles.  
- Try and put pressure on your front toe, ankle and knee to initiate a toe side turn with your body corked/riding with poles
- Now align your shoulders with the body and make that same front ankle, knee move.
- Compare the two and I will bet the aligned, non-corked, non-poled stance feels better.

Comments?
post #45 of 50
I can prove you are wrong about riding with poles, I've skied & boarded all over the globe with poles for 25 years, while heliskiing in New Zealand the guide told me I had the best of both worlds & could maneuver in all conditions better than any snowboarder or skier he had ever seen because of my poles, patrollers at (to many to list) resorts have told me I make them jealous of my style in powder riding with poles, ski guides in Chamonix have been impressed with my ability to keep up with (and pass them in the flats) with poles, I have a forward alpine carve stance on my board & they help me to get upright quickly & easily after a fall in deep powder, I can use them to help pull up other riders in difficult or flat terrain. They never hinder my riding & I do a lot of split boarding & never have to strap them to my pack. At resorts I don't have to stop & unstrap my back foot in the lifeline & stop again at the top to strap back in. There are a few enlightened skiers I also ski with who have used poles as well to the same advantage when they snowboard who can't believe more crossover skiers haven't discovered the advantages of riding with poles. Obviously, riding the park & pipe they aren't of much use but I don't ride park & pipe. Don't knock it if you haven't tried it & it does take some adjustments to your style but in deep powder many people think I'm a skier until they look closer to see I'm riding a board.
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfsnowgirl View Post

Thank you for this post.   I am thinking about picking up another board cause I miss it at times and I will totally bring ski poles with me. I totally wasn't knocking it so please don't think I was.  I am pro using poles.  I just can't think they wouldn't be helpful.  Especially when you spin around on your front edge, just plant those poles once you spin around and bada bing, nice steady stance while you kibitz with your mates or take a picture or wait for someone (whatever your reason for stopping).   Do you just hold your poles gently in front while you are carving your way down the mountain?
post #47 of 50
Sorry snowsurfgirl, my reply was intended for Michaelwma
post #48 of 50

Thank you for this post.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by 198 cm Doughboy View Post

Sorry snowsurfgirl, my reply was intended for Michaelwma

 

No worries :)

 

I am still so glad I have company in the poles while snowboarding department.  

post #49 of 50

Recently I mistakenly took a trail that had a lot of flats.  When I got to the bottom I was exhausted.  I am thinking of getting a childrens ski pole or a telescoping ski pole to keep in my backpack.  I can see this being really useful in flat areas.  I've also thought of using a telescoping selfie stick.  I can usually bend down and sort of push myself along with my hands but I thought that having some sort of short pole would really speed things up.  Unstrapping and skating is for the birds, especially if you are old and out of shape.

post #50 of 50

You can get a 3-piece pole like the Mountainsmith Pinnacle for less than $20

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