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Have your bindings ever not released you from a fall? - Page 3

post #61 of 74
NYCJIM,  Check them yourself.  You never posted your weight and DIN.  So lets say you are 190lbs and run a DIN of 8. To check your own bindings release do the following.

1. make sure boot fit is proper  in the binding, DIN is set precisely on both front and back and the binding and anti-friction pad are clean and lubed lightly.

2.  On the carpet put your strong side in the ski, have a friend/wife etc. sta nd on the tails  and do the following:  With a bent/flexed knee go forward as hard as you can.  Your heel should release/not to hard/not to easy.

3.  On the carpet, with knee bent and flexed, twist your foot to the inside to release the toe, if you can barely do this then that is about right (unless your are a real weenie and couch potatoe etc.)

Some of the above comments are right on the money and a few are really off.  Basically you should come out on a real bad fall even if it is just one ski and not on "easy" falls.   the leg doer in falls are the very slow twisters/try not to put yourself into these predicaments. In answer to your question in 35 plus years and a lot of falls:  Premature releases; about 6, one racing (chattered a ski off in a SG), couple times in heavy wet manky powder and a couple other times.  I weigh 193 and run a DIN of 8 and find that works for me.

As one of the above posters said they won't work all the time but you can narrow the error portion down by being aware of your skiing abilities and your bindings workings.
post #62 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

I think everyone has to be able to accept that injury is something that can be a consequence of just choosing to ski, regardless of what safety measures one takes. There are some things that we can't control and there are a few things that can be done to mitigate risks. IMO, it's up to the inidivudual to educated themselves enough to be able to make informed decisions for themselves and not just rely on what they read on message boards. This is a great place for info but I don't think it's the place to get binding DIN advice as there are so many divergent levels of talent, skier types, and preferred terrain. 

Just because someone says they ski at DIN 13 or DIN 4 doesn't mean you should mimic their settings. I think the moral of the story is that following reccomended settings is the place to start for most skiers. Why fix something if it ain't broke? IMO, folks should refrain from relying on 'pre-release' horror stories or the reccomendations of others when deciding on how to choose DIN. They're your skis and you are riding them. It's also your knees and your tibia. You own them, not the guy telling you good skiers crank the binding to max.

 

   Very good MojoMan.  I like what your saying.   
  
   Also this is the first time I ever heard of the KneeBindings.  Thanks.   I don't take any Mags, or go to shops that sell equip. very often!
I'd like to get some feed back on those from people who have them.   I'll search for a thread on them now!

I know this might seem nutty, but I put a rub on graphite wax on my boot bottoms, and also on my friction plates ( toe, and heel anywhere there is contact. )   Sometimes I use a paste wax on the bindings.   

This shouldn't be needed to be said in this thread, but it is so important to have NO snow pack between your boot and binding, or under the brake plate.   Most all but starters know this.   Want a pre-release?  Leave a little pack under your heel! 
post #63 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

NYCJIM,  Check them yourself.  You never posted your weight and DIN.  So lets say you are 190lbs and run a DIN of 8. To check your own bindings release do the following.

1. make sure boot fit is proper  in the binding, DIN is set precisely on both front and back and the binding and anti-friction pad are clean and lubed lightly.

2.  On the carpet put your strong side in the ski, have a friend/wife etc. sta nd on the tails  and do the following:  With a bent/flexed knee go forward as hard as you can.  Your heel should release/not to hard/not to easy.

3.  On the carpet, with knee bent and flexed, twist your foot to the inside to release the toe, if you can barely do this then that is about right (unless your are a real weenie and couch potatoe etc.)

Some of the above comments are right on the money and a few are really off.  Basically you should come out on a real bad fall even if it is just one ski and not on "easy" falls.   the leg doer in falls are the very slow twisters/try not to put yourself into these predicaments. In answer to your question in 35 plus years and a lot of falls:  Premature releases; about 6, one racing (chattered a ski off in a SG), couple times in heavy wet manky powder and a couple other times.  I weigh 193 and run a DIN of 8 and find that works for me.

As one of the above posters said they won't work all the time but you can narrow the error portion down by being aware of your skiing abilities and your bindings workings.

Stubborn people can injure themselves with the above test.  If it hurts stop!
post #64 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post




Stubborn people can injure themselves with the above test.  If it hurts stop!
 


When I was younger (stronger knees), I would always exit my skis by turning my boots or just driving forward. click, click out. It is daily feedback on your bindings. Not very scientific, but an indication. not recommending this or anything, really.
post #65 of 74

My knees ain't what they used to be either. Whenever I try the twist-out testing of my bindings, I can feel it in the knees. Just five years ago, it was nothing.

When you are in your 20's and 30's, you can get away with a lot of stuff, IMO. When you turn fourty, things change a bit, at least they did for me. You might start feeling all that stuff you have been doing to your knees over the years--running, cycling, skiing, etc.



 

post #66 of 74
You don't notice the small but cumulative damage you do to yourself until it builds up past a certain point.  I was just noticing an old injury to my achilies tendon the other day that I had successfully ignored for decades.
post #67 of 74
Actually, the worse thing I ever did to my knee was when I tried snowboarding. Took a lesson and when I get off the lift the board twisted almost 180 degrees on the attached foot while I fell backward. It put a serious hurting on my knee. I got up and continued and it was sore for a short while. I am just starting to notice pain in that knee the past couple of season.
post #68 of 74
The self test for your bindings - assumed -  The skier has some common sense.
post #69 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post


Why does everyone always think the Skier Type as listed on the Binding charts refers to degree of skill or experience? 

I,II,III does not refer to beginner, intermediate, and advanced.

Beginners are placed in Type I because they do not ski fast enough or aggressively enough to need II, III, or III+ type settings.  

On the other hand, many advances skiers do not rate themselves as Type III or III+ because they, '..Prefer moderate speeds and prefer a variety of terrain at a variety of speeds.'

Skiing fast and aggressively is NOT a sign of skill or experience. Often, it is quite the opposite. Most of the time it just means someone is on a slope beyond their ability to competantly navigate and they gun it all the way down to minimize having to turn. Likewise, preferring to ski at moderate speeds is NOT a sign of lack of skill or experience.

If the Skier Type referred to true skill level or experience, most skiers on the hill on any given day would be given a I - minus.  


It doesn't map to skill level, it maps to risk level.  That loosely maps to skill levels.  It's a trade between release and retention, and you pick the level that gives the right mix and an acceptable risk.  I don't think anyone suggested it ties directly/strongly to the arbitrary skill levels we tend to use for teaching/etc.  It just happens to fall out that way in many cases.
post #70 of 74
i have a feeling this isn't the right forum to ask this but here i go:

135 lbs
5'2
agressive racer
marker 10.0 bindings were set at a din of 7 but at the past race i popped out of my outside ski coming over the pitch. at the time the binding was set at a 6.
since the din was increased by 1 i popped out 3 times at one practice where the course was in bad shape. it was always on the outside ski so i dont think it was a question of clipping the gate. but since my volkls delaminated i switched to fischers

the real question:
if my marker 10.0 bindings were set at a 7 (and i was still occasionally popping out) and my fischer z11 bindings are set at a 6, should they be set at the same DIN? is DIN universal to all junior-ish level bindings?
post #71 of 74
I would say my skis stay on MUCH more often in a fall than coming off. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post

I'm very mad about this today.  Yesterday I hit a giant ice patch and wiped out, not at a great speed, as I was ending a turn.  But I did wind up "in the backseat" and fell.  I don't remember exactly how I fell but I distinctly remember my leg being twisted and my weight coming down and NOT releasing my boot.  I felt like I broke my leg.

I think I mildly sprained the muscles above the ankle.  But I'm really mad that this happened.  I should have been released from the skis.

So I guess I better bring my skis to be checked out.  My fear is that they will overcompensate and make it too loose, now.  

 
post #72 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post





Never happened to me. Skiing Sierra cement last Saturday in the rain. And that was with my early-season poor form to boot.  Have been skiing on 7.5 for three seasons and regardless of condtions, never onced pre-released at 7.5. Granted, I don't race, do not ski at 60mph, and do not shki chutes. 

Actually, I was lectured by my instructor a few seasons ago about skiing on 9. To parahrase, 'Forget what you heard in the bars. The only people that can justify a DIN above 8 are racers, true experts who push themelves and their gear to the limits, or hardcore backcountry huckers. If you are free skiing inbounds and are coming out at DIN 8, you are either doing something very badly or you have a defective pair of bindings. Most pre-releases are technique related. Period.'



 

My din was set by a shop (paid for it), I am a type 2, and they were set to 10.
post #73 of 74
Especially if one person is 90 pounds and the other is 300 :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

 

Just because someone says they ski at DIN 13 or DIN 4 doesn't mean you should mimic their settings.
 
post #74 of 74
Kind of off topic, but about 20 years ago my dad told me people skid straight down climax (at Mammoth MOuntain) AND were able to make it all the way to the top of chair 3.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post





I don't think it's possible. even if the hill was completely flat and you held on for the face, there is that right angle turn at the bottom. miss that and you lose. but that's pretty obvious to anyone who's seen it. If it had been done, it'd be legend and we'd know. If it could be done, those guys straightlining Palisades would be all over it. Need an apron for a run out for a truly epic straightine.
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