EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › So, my wife said... (middle aged ski bumming related)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

So, my wife said... (middle aged ski bumming related) - Page 2

post #31 of 48
 Hey - I love to ski as much as anybody.  

I've seen many examples of people 'Livin the Dream'.....   Usually in a beach town.  Leave the big city and rat race.  They are 'Livin the Dream' for a few years.  Working in a shop, dealing with the tourists.  Then it happens.  They become miserable.  They can't stand themselves, and no one can stand being near them.

I can't say it would happen to you, but this is a big decision........  

Let us know what happens!
post #32 of 48
You have to love what you do for a living.  I teach skiing and snowboarding, in the winter and swimming in the other seasons.  But if my husband didn't have his job, we would not have health insurance.  Three years to go to early retirement, and hoping the company doesn't cancel the benefits, including heatlth insurance.  So with good planning, you can spend more time in the snow. 
post #33 of 48
My wife is a teacher.  A great one at that I must say but she gets that lovely break every year and we've always taken advantage of it.  We go do something off the hook every year.  In 04 we bicycled on our own from Snowbasin (where we lived) to Denver, 980 miles back and forth across the mountains.  In 05 we bicycled from Burlington VT to Bar Harbor ME and back in a big circle of about 1,000 miles.  In 06 we flew to Zurich and spent a month bicycling through the Swiss Alps.  In 07 we dropped into Alaska and bicycled through remote places where there was virtually nothing for days, except jaw dropping beauty and a grizzly or two.  In 08 I retired at 42 from the USAF and we said what the hay, and we moved to the Vail Valley.  It was one of the only places we could find that met all of our "Dream Location Criteria", which actually didn't include skiing but mountains were way up there on the list.  In 09 we backpacked 110 miles around the highest mountain in Europe, Mont Blanc, a walk that included 37,000 ft of elevation gain.  We're just starting to think of what we might do for 2010.  So much to do.

You never know what the near future will hold or what it won't.  There's no certainty that you or I will even live past tomorrow.  Figure out what there is out there that you really want to do and get it done.  Once your finished, reevaluate and repeat.  For some reason I got into this routine at an early age and I could have died long ago with a smile on my face.  After all, I moved to the beaches of South FL to attend college.       At 44 it seems like I've lived 100 years. I'm shooting for 150.
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canyonlands View Post

My wife is a teacher.  A great one at that I must say but she gets that lovely break every year and we've always taken advantage of it.  We go do something off the hook every year.  In 04 we bicycled on our own from Snowbasin (where we lived) to Denver, 980 miles back and forth across the mountains.  In 05 we bicycled from Burlington VT to Bar Harbor ME and back in a big circle of about 1,000 miles.  In 06 we flew to Zurich and spent a month bicycling through the Swiss Alps.  In 07 we dropped into Alaska and bicycled through remote places where there was virtually nothing for days, except jaw dropping beauty and a grizzly or two.  In 08 I retired at 42 from the USAF and we said what the hay, and we moved to the Vail Valley.  It was one of the only places we could find that met all of our "Dream Location Criteria", which actually didn't include skiing but mountains were way up there on the list.  In 09 we backpacked 110 miles around the highest mountain in Europe, Mont Blanc, a walk that included 37,000 ft of elevation gain.  We're just starting to think of what we might do for 2010.  So much to do.

You never know what the near future will hold or what it won't.  There's no certainty that you or I will even live past tomorrow.  Figure out what there is out there that you really want to do and get it done.  Once your finished, reevaluate and repeat.  For some reason I got into this routine at an early age and I could have died long ago with a smile on my face.  After all, I moved to the beaches of South FL to attend college.       At 44 it seems like I've lived 100 years. I'm shooting for 150.
 


Wow, talk about living a dream - In 2010 why not climb the 14's in Colorado.
post #35 of 48
I retired at 47. Health insurance hasn't been that big a deal yet. Me, wife, son 16. $10k deductable, they pay for free annual checkup. $2300 a year. Big plus, you turn every bill into them and they get the prices reduced to their discounted rate that you then pay. A $200 blood test ends up costing $17. We're all pretty healthy so may not work for some.
post #36 of 48
If your "outgo" is greater than your "income", then your "upkeep" will be your "downfall". If you live smart and below your means...you have options. 
post #37 of 48
Great discussion.  Inspiring.

stevesmith7 -- who is your health insurance with?  That sounds like a good deal.
post #38 of 48

Iinteresting. 

Start of Dream.  Sitting on couch about 10 yrs ago (57yrs) and telling my wife about my favorite daydream. Walking into Sacramento airport in the month of August  when it is 107 degrees outside with my skis over my shoulder.  Fly to Portillo and ski for a week. My wife in all her wisdom looked me right in the eyes and said. "Go do it Pete, you aren't getting any younger you know".  So I did - still tell Rokka Jac lift stores in the bar.

When 60 yrs came (and my wife was still 39) we left the hustle, bustle, traffic, cost, crime and overall feeling of being crowded and moved to St. Maries Id., pop 2250.  Bought 5  acre and built a house.




Wife and I both had our own businesses we could work out of house.  Wife Conference coordinator and me an expert witness.  Wife is still working just a little and I retired fully in Jan 09.  Dream come true; ski all winter, bike and fish and play  golf all summer.  Bought season pass to Silver Mt. and Lookout Pass (330 for both).  Life is great.  I am 67 yrs young now and sure and sure glad I didn't wait another..............years.  A lot of guys at work etc., told me I would be bored to death - but hasn't happened and won't.   I would be skiing today if I didn't have this damn cold.  But hey Epic is fun too.

  Wife Sandee at Silver Mt.  Notice the crowds?

 

 

  Silver Mt. looking N toward Canada.  Really crowded run.  One skier on it ugh.

Anyway a little taste of a guy who did it.  Don't wait Warren in right you know. Realistically/statistically at 67yr I don 't have a lot of time left but am looking forward to :  Cat skiing in BC this year, catching some 20 plus in. cutthroat on the Clark Fork. Lowering my handicap and breaking 80 or even 85. 

Hope you all have your dreams come true - AS A FAMOUS PHILANDERER ONCE SAID.   JUST DO IT.

post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidding View Post

Great discussion.  Inspiring.

stevesmith7 -- who is your health insurance with?  That sounds like a good deal.


I've been with Humana for quite a while.
post #40 of 48
Even as a little boy growing up in Maine I would tell people that I wanted to be a ski bum in the winter and a lawyer in the summer. Not unusual since I come from a family of skiers and lawyers. So at 53, and 28 years into my practice I can say that I have fulfilled half of that goal. For the last 20 years I have flown solo, representing mostly folks with disabilities and work related injuries against insurance companies and government systems. It has been very fulfilling work. One on one. Person to person. When you win, you pull them and their families out of a very dark, deep hole. That is good lawyering. And business comes from word of mouth. You just can't buy that kind of advertising. I have never gone hungry.

But the second part of the dream has remained more elusive. I am typing this a day after returning from Sugarloaf where my family spent seven days on the hill. We got it all. Rain, frozen mist, -45F wind chills while sandblasted by wind whipped frozen granular, boilerplate and a few inches of pow. And now I am home, and it is snowing. Well over a foot expected. And I am 3.5 hours away on the coast of Maine. And I ask myself, why am I not there now. John Lennon would answer - life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans. 

The idea of moving, like Mohammed, to the mountains occupies more and more of my thoughts. Some would say I am crazy, even spoiled. I live on the banks of Eggemoggin Reach, the place I like to say, where the Almighty spends his summer vacation. But in the waves I hear the call of the mountains. For me that is sacred ground. Huddled on the chair this week, whipped by arctic winds, the cold penetrated to my core. And its breath left white, frozen kisses on my cheek and nose. But the majesty of winter's touch on the mountain feeds the soul.  And that is what draws us to them. The mountain and its wintry decorator dish up no opinion. Just fact. Raw honesty. Beyond the elation of skiing, for me, a move to the mountains will restore me to the place where I was meant to be, not just want to be.

But for most of us, with kids to feed and school, and with family ties already stretched too thin, the "plan" remains a titillation - that itch that we just love to scratch, but not all the way. What I try to do in the meantime is to make what I am doing now as fulfilling and satisfying as possible, so that when I make that move to the hills I will be able to say that what came before was time and effort well spent and well completed. 

Happy trails to all.

David

PS: On a more mundane matter, the House ( and perhaps Senate version) of the Health Reform Act contained a provision extending Medicare to those 55 to 64 - subject to limitations. If it survives, it should be called the Act to Assist the Early Retirement of Skiers. Yours truly included.

 
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canyonlands View Post

My wife is a teacher.  A great one at that I must say but she gets that lovely break every year and we've always taken advantage of it.  We go do something off the hook every year.  In 04 we bicycled on our own from Snowbasin (where we lived) to Denver, 980 miles back and forth across the mountains.  In 05 we bicycled from Burlington VT to Bar Harbor ME and back in a big circle of about 1,000 miles.  In 06 we flew to Zurich and spent a month bicycling through the Swiss Alps.  In 07 we dropped into Alaska and bicycled through remote places where there was virtually nothing for days, except jaw dropping beauty and a grizzly or two.  In 08 I retired at 42 from the USAF and we said what the hay, and we moved to the Vail Valley.  It was one of the only places we could find that met all of our "Dream Location Criteria", which actually didn't include skiing but mountains were way up there on the list.  In 09 we backpacked 110 miles around the highest mountain in Europe, Mont Blanc, a walk that included 37,000 ft of elevation gain.  We're just starting to think of what we might do for 2010.  So much to do.

You never know what the near future will hold or what it won't.  There's no certainty that you or I will even live past tomorrow.  Figure out what there is out there that you really want to do and get it done.  Once your finished, reevaluate and repeat.  For some reason I got into this routine at an early age and I could have died long ago with a smile on my face.  After all, I moved to the beaches of South FL to attend college.       At 44 it seems like I've lived 100 years. I'm shooting for 150.
 

Whoa, I'm your same age...and still have 18 years of work in front of me before even thinking to retire (if they keep changing laws here, it will be even longer). Many of us think that we will not outlive our workdays...
As for moving to the mountains..I entertained that idea back in 2004 but lack of money for the plan, two sons, a mortgage still to pay on an house I don't live into, lawyers to be paid...made me stay where I am...
I am of the inclination of those who said to the OP :"do what you plan, then make it work once there"
I look with envy to any of you who did it, whatever that  particular "did" is. The only thing I object to are discourses of the
type "If there's wil , there's a way". I grew up with that idea inculcated into my mind, until an army doctor put an end to
my plans, the blow he delivered was so total, so final that nearly annihilated me. I'm still paying the consequences of that.20 years later a heart surgeon finished the "work". So, do it, be happy, take your risks, get the rewards. But don't preach (this sentence is not intended to anyone in particular, it's a general statement).  

Paradoxally..my current job allows me a certain degree of tele.commuting...So potentially I could move, at least part time, to the mountains and work from there. If not for that damn mortgage...In the meantime, I'm working on GF to make her a ski addicted...After that...we shall see what we shall see. 
 
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kermit88 View Post

 Hey - I love to ski as much as anybody.  

I've seen many examples of people 'Livin the Dream'.....   Usually in a beach town.  Leave the big city and rat race.  They are 'Livin the Dream' for a few years.  Working in a shop, dealing with the tourists.  Then it happens.  They become miserable.  They can't stand themselves, and no one can stand being near them.

I can't say it would happen to you, but this is a big decision........  

Let us know what happens!
 


This is right on the money.  I see this here in Florida all the time.  People who give up their "rat race" job to move to their idea of paradise, so that they can pursue their hobby.  Unless you have a large trust fund, or are in a position where you're truly financially capable of retiring, you're probably going to have to work.  If your job sucks it doesn't matter where you live.  Long ago someone once said, "if you love your job you'll never work a day in your life".  Of course, if you can find a job you love, and it's in a place that you want to live...

In response to the OP - I sympathize with you.  There is no doubt in my mind that the worst thing about getting older is watching your parents become elderly.
post #43 of 48
This is a beautiful thread.  My husband and I decided to make some major life changes (moving from the East to the West, reworking our lives to maximize skiing & being outdoors, demoting our careers) after my apparently healthy uncle fell unexpectedly ill, then into a coma and a slow death.  It was horrible in so many ways, and it made us realize that our plans to make these changes when we had enough in the nestegg and a bunch of other ducks in a row was a real crapshoot.  Well, that was seven years ago, and we are both very happy with our decision.

Addressing the "Florida syndrome" described earlier, I will say that I struggle sometimes with keeping my brain sufficiently active/engaged.  Finding good projects to work on (sadly, usually without pay) is an ongoing endeavor.  It's easy to develop brain rot when you don't have a challenging job, but it IS possible to avoid this.  This also takes care of any irrational guilt I feel about not being a contributing member of society.

Making the decision to rearrange your lives is big.  Take some time to think through the foreseeable issues, but remember that individual lives are fragile and anything can happen any time, whether or not you become ski bums.  Best of luck!
post #44 of 48

I guess I'm a club member - moved to Sandpoint Idaho from Ann Arbor Michigan at the end of September '09.  My wife (we've been married about a year and a half) and I had been looking and planning for about 4 years, visiting mountain (or near mountain) communities that met a variety of criteria.  In the mean time I started planning financially for an "early retirement."  It didn't look like things would be as comfortable as before but we figured who needed as much money if your immediate and extended (driving range) environment offered extensive opportunity for adventure, activity, and beauty. I'm just about 58 and she's 50.

I worked for the U for 35 years (30 years as a Professor).  Their retirement and health benefits have allowed me more flexibility than most.  We have been VERY lucky in our move.  Bought a house in Sandpoint in Sept. '08 and then sold my house in Ann Arbor in December '08.  That was a risky move but in the end it let us move to a house with a view of lake and mountains on a break even basis.  If it had turned to the worst case I might have been unable to retire.  Both my kids are out of college, on their own and working.

My wife was not a skier but she is becoming one.  We are taking it very slowly.  She's making very nice turns but still on the bunny hill.  Now that holiday "crowds" (not really) at Schweitzer are gone we're going to try to move up to blues on the main mountain. 

Sandpoint and Schweitzer are very foggy this time of year.  Of course "Michigan grey" was no great pleasure either.  However, when we wake up and the clouds are lifted a bit or are settled down low with the snowy peaks of the Cabinets showing over Lake Pend Oreille, the gloominess is quite glorious and we are uplifted more than brought down.  Of course when we wake up to a bluebird day (rarer in winter but quite common in summer) it's pretty unbelievable.

We've got tremendous beauty, expansive areas (U.S. and Canada) to explore over the years, hiking from the house, nearby spectacular trails, a great ski mountain 9 miles up the road, numerous ski areas to investigate within driving range, a beautiful lake (one of the largest in the Western United States) with mountains rising out of it, etc.  Additionally, the people of Sandpoint have been friendly and welcoming.  Politically and socioeconomically the area is more diverse than anywhere I have lived, although there is almost no racial diversity. 

It will take time to know what are lives will really be like here but our initial experiences have exceeded our expectations.  I'm not sure we've found Nirvana but if things continue to fall into place we will have a rich life filled with beauty and opportunity that I only used to dream about. Hmmm, maybe we will reach Nirvana someday?

P.S.  Just want to say thanks to Pete No. Idaho who one of many people who was helpful to us in making this move.


Edited by Si - 1/4/10 at 9:40am
post #45 of 48
Well this has certainly gotten me thinking about my future, fresh out of college with a decent job, I love skiing without a doubt but have a hard time figuring out if it's something I'll continue to love when I'm much older in age. Long and confusing is this hill of life, up one moment, and down the next.
post #46 of 48
Thread Starter 
 A follow up...

The decision has been made. We are both leaving our jobs on December 9th (my 57th birthday).

This summer, I will find us a one bedroom apt in Bethel, Me and buy two season passes to Sunday River. At the conclusion of the ski season, we will move to our beach house where my wife will take the summer off and I will re-establish my business contacts and start taking work in a new geographical area. We will keep the Pa house for one year as a safety net in case we don't like the move.

The plan is to spend every winter in a different ski town on the east coast. This first winter we will not work but thereafter, find Friday-Sunday  part time jobs to offset expenses and spend Monday to Thursday skiing.

Watching my 90 year old father slide slowly downhill has had a profound effect on me. it's time to get off the treadmill and start really living life. 
post #47 of 48
Congratulations on the decision, Stowe -- I'm still in my early 30s, trying to build the resume that will let me do what you're doing earlier in my life. It's great to hear that you're chasing your dream.
post #48 of 48
Plannning is everything. You don't make a complete lifestyle change overnight without the proper research and plannning.  We moved 1,000 miles and prepared correctly.  Love St. Maries and the people and life.  Good luck with your decision.


Thanks Si, glad to hear things are going good.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › So, my wife said... (middle aged ski bumming related)