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Do any of you use a Camelbak ? - Page 2

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post




 

Comprex...I'll have to disagree with you.  Out West, you need hydration, at the higher altitude and extreme dry air, you dehydrate much quicker and without even knowing it.  I used to put 4 or 5 bottles of water in my backpack, they would be gone in 3 hours and I wouldn't have to pee at all.  I switched to the largest capacity hydration pack I could find.  Lack of hydration out west will increase fatigue, cause headaches and contribute to altitude sickness.
post #32 of 59
never skied with comprex have ya!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipirate View Post




Comprex...I'll have to disagree with you.  Out West, you need hydration, at the higher altitude and extreme dry air, you dehydrate much quicker and without even knowing it.  I used to put 4 or 5 bottles of water in my backpack, they would be gone in 3 hours and I wouldn't have to pee at all.  I switched to the largest capacity hydration pack I could find.  Lack of hydration out west will increase fatigue, cause headaches and contribute to altitude sickness.
 
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post

 the Stash BC is big enough for a full first aid kid as well.

 


That's amazing. I had a Stash BC and I think I could have maybe fit an infant in there, tops. Is this kid CPR certified?


I like peeing in the snow and if I can get loaded just by sniffing a beer bottle cap.
post #34 of 59
I've tried Camelback, MSR, and DaKine hydrations systems, and have finally found the best one:
Platypus.  Def the highest quality construction, and it doesn't cost more.  I highly recomend getting a backpack you like, and putting a platypus bladder and winter tube kit in it.
post #35 of 59
I occasionally use a Camelback if I anticipate a physically hard day (i.e. mucho bumps or climbing), or if it is going to be really warm, but I never wear it over my jacket.  I have a 50 oz. very flat Snowbowl with no pockets.  It fits under my jacket with the tube inside, so I can drink by unzipping on the lift rides.  Since it is inside, there are no problems freezing or snagging on the chairs.
post #36 of 59
Yes. have an insulated one. wear it outside my coat ever since that time the hose came off and i had a very cold shower :-0

just blow back gently after each use and no problems with freezing.
post #37 of 59

Hydration starts 24hours before you are on the snow. Drinking water the night before is much more helpful than toting 2L of water in a backpack. If I am hydrated at 8am I don't need the camelback for a full day of downhill skiing.
 

I don't like skiing with a pack if I don't have to. I think it hurts my balance and dealng with a pack on the lift is more trouble than its worth. When I have skied wiht the camelback before, I have never drank more than a quart of it  during the day riding lifts. 

It takes like 2 minutes to run inside and grab a drink if I get thristy. I can also easily swing by the car on my local hill to grab a  quick drink, shed layers, etc... and always leave a quart or two for that purpose. I will bring a small bottle in a poacket if I am hiking a bit or if I am skiing with a big group and don't want to get left behind.
post #38 of 59
Things like water bottles in your pockets a) get in the way of your skiing and b) can injure you if you fall on them. Think cracked ribs or internal injuries from landing on a solid object that wants to intrude into your bod; not the same as landing on a flat surface like the snow.

Taking my water as I need it is more comfortable for me than downing a liter to last me the AM or PM.

I wear mine on the outside of my waterproof gear so that if I have a blow-out, it only soaks the outside and freezes. I stay dry. Must say I've only blown one out mt. biking. The hydration pack worked like a back protector/air bag combo.
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipirate View Post

Comprex...I'll have to disagree with you.  Out West, you need hydration, at the higher altitude and extreme dry air, you dehydrate much quicker and without even knowing it.  I used to put 4 or 5 bottles of water in my backpack, they would be gone in 3 hours and I wouldn't have to pee at all.  I switched to the largest capacity hydration pack I could find.  Lack of hydration out west will increase fatigue, cause headaches and contribute to altitude sickness.

Skipirate,

  I was actually a little bit sneaky and listed two cases,

the first is completely inadequate hydration that doesn't  justify carrying a hydration pack (96 oz in 10 hours)

and the second (96 oz in 2 hours) is pretty much the fluid absorption limit beyond which, in order to hydrate, you'd need an IV.

I sneakily left the 96 oz in 5-8 hours range wide open, so that people would notice

a) large bladders 72-96oz are pointless if you go into a cafeteria or bathroom half way during the day.

b) It is NOT about how much you carry on your back, it is about the total you've actually consumed.

c) buying a hydration pack doesn't mean you've trained yourself to drink the quantity required.


Still disagree?
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

Must say I've only blown one out mt. biking. The hydration pack worked like a back protector/air bag combo.

4 down, all  inline skating crashes at speed.     Asphalt sands nylon down -fast-. 
post #41 of 59
there are some interesting observations re: hydration here:

http://bit.ly/7So8A1
post #42 of 59
Still not quite sure what you're saying, comprex. 

In any event, the fact that I have a 72-90oz bladder doesn't mean I fill it all the way. I rarely fill any bladder more than 2/3.

Nor does it mean that I consume its contents in a single day.  I fill enough that I won't run out (or stick a Nuun tube in my pack in case I need to refill), and the packs with their unused contents spend the nights in our outside closet, which typically maintains temps in the 30s.



FWIW, Jer FTW.
post #43 of 59
"Listen to your body" is a saying that has a lot meaning to me. When I cycle in the summer or ski out west in winter, my body tells me it needs to be hydrated. Sometimes, that may be just rolling a small amount of water in my mouth. I selected a very small hydration backpack and it fills all my needs for water, lightness and compact size to fit under a parka on colder days. Add some commercial powder supplement, like Gatorade, on days when skiing hard.
post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post

"Listen to your body" is a saying that has a lot meaning to me.
 


Screw that! Listening to some annonymous dude in the internet makes a lot more sense.
post #45 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Hydration starts 24hours before you are on the snow. Drinking water the night before is much more helpful than toting 2L of water in a backpack. If I am hydrated at 8am I don't need the camelback for a full day of downhill skiing. 
 


I agree on the pre-hydration part. But even then, drinking DURING the day is still neccessary to replenish the moisture lost throughout the day of skiing.

And when skiing multiple days, you HAVE TO drink while skiing. Or you can't drink enough in the evening to last the second and third day.
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

I agree on the pre-hydration part. But even then, drinking DURING the day is still neccessary to replenish the moisture lost throughout the day of skiing.

And when skiing multiple days, you HAVE TO drink while skiing. Or you can't drink enough in the evening to last the second and third day.
Yea thats right. The rest of the post you quoted form said as much. I never liked skiing with packs and I never seem to get dehydrated while skiing. Its really quite easy to find water at any large ski area I have been to. It is faster than finding a bathroom thats for sure. I just can't recommend that anyone cary a pack for drinking water around on the lifts -- with the obvious exception for people who hike alot.
post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Yea thats right. The rest of the post you quoted form said as much. Still carying a pack of water around is not a good plan.
 

Unlike some of the other people, I don't carry the whole kitchen sink on my back! 

My camelbal is quite thin (doesn't have 25 pockets!). Although it has a good size blader, I don't fill it to the brim when I know I would only drink about a quart for half a day (refill at lunch). As such, it's almost no weight and doesn't get in the way on the chair.

On days when we plan to hike for extended distance, the story is entirely different. I would wear a REAL backpack!
post #48 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post




 

You seem to have the mentality that anyone who uses a hydration pack spends equal amounts of time drinking and pissing in the bathroom ? Do I have this correct ? Totally FALSE. A hydration pack is pure convienence, and a consistant way to introduce fluids. Sking from what I have learned seems to have far more "waiting" time than actuall sking time (at least from my perspective) so there is PLENTY of time in the lift line to sip water, plenty of time at the bottom of the hill right after your run, plenty of time on the chair ride up the mountain without having to go find a water fountain (if you can even find "free" water) . I've been using a Camelbak for the past 15 years, and  I might use the bathroom once over the course of say a 6 hour span of activity  (and this tells me that I am still slightly dehydrated).

post #49 of 59
No.   Read it again and you won't need a straw man argument.

Once again, for convenience:

 I have the mentality that  Camelbaks are  a FETISH  and that anyone who can drink 3 beers in one sitting can also drink one liter of water at the same sitting.   Or faster.

I also have the mentality that Camelbaks are a FETISH because people who object to being dehydrated and carry Camelbaks apparently still FAIL to drink enough.        Carrying a 3L Camelbak just to be able to drink 12-20 oz extra a day (i.e. less than 2 cans of soda) is the highest possible apex of FETISHISM.

I also have the mentality that the low levels of "dehydration" such as experienced by modern humans on ski slopes would have resulted in humans dying off long before Camelbaks were invented if they actually impaired human performance to the levels alleged.       Again, Camelbaks = FETISH.

I also have the mentality that non-stop sports (like randonee, tele touring or XC skiing) actually require intense levels of hydration (even at levels of 800ml-1.2 liters per hour) and therefore require use of something like Camelbaks, dehydration occuring nonetheless.   (And no bathroom stops required).     I have the mentality that most people have NO CONCEPT of how to drink this much water.

I have the mentality that, if a skier is working at lift-served alpine skiing even remotely as hard as someone else who is climbing 600-1000 vert per hour, the lift-riding skier needs lessons.    Badly.
post #50 of 59
post #51 of 59
 I used to get really thirsty when I skied.

Drinking a large bottle of water before skiing and again at lunch would do the trick just as well, I suppose. But I don't always go inside during the day. The water at Whitetail tastes worse than DC tap, so I fill up at home.

I had the Camelback for mountain biking, so I started using it for skiing, under my jacket.  It works for me. 

Those large colorful water bottles are kind of FETISH too, really.
post #52 of 59
Have a Camelbak MULE in fetching green and white and I pretty much drink a bladder's worth in a days skiing. It's all about convenience really, I drink a lot and I don't like to stop at cafes much (crowded, noisy, bad food etc). The pack itself is pretty silly that said, lots of needless straps and things on it (imo). Comfy and holds my spare gear and snack food though.
post #53 of 59

I will wear the camel back from time to time because I find it an easy and convienient way to drink water on the lift after pounding some Mary Jane moguls.  
I know my body better than anyone else and I know what keeps it running efficiently.  I can't imagine anyone discouraging the drinking of water during an activity such as skiing... no matter their level.  What does it hurt?   Plus, it allows me to get in more runs as we eat lunch on the lift. 
Maybe some feel it improves their skiing, maybe it doesn't.  Who cares.  Just do what you want to do and enjoy the mountain!


Peace, Love, Bumps 

 

post #54 of 59
comprex is a macho man and looks great in chaps (my favorite fetish)
i like to drink water on the lift, cause i get cotton mouth from all the dope smoking.
my bong fits in my pack also.
post #55 of 59
High activity, high altitude, high risk of dehydration....  Yep, I ski with a hydration pack, but no pills!

Look at the Dakine set of hydration packs.  The packs are great and you can put whatever type of bladder in it you want but the the Dakine bladder works well.  Last year it was made by Nalgene but this year they have a new version. 

FYI, for the guy in St. Anton.... It is very rude not to share your Schnapps with the other people on the tram.  When I lived their we carried a flask and if we pulled it out, we always had to pass it around.  Of course your answer could have simply been "hay I'm an American, it's only water".  This they would have understood. 
post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Hydration packs are useless for lift-served skiing


 

That depends. First, there are resorts where potable water is not available in some zones (years ago, this was the case at Crested Butte for sure). Where I ski, above 2000 meters there is none, for example. You could buy it, of course, but that's not what we're talking about, right?

Then, there's the time issue. At my hill, on weekdays, the tram runs every 30 minutes. Runs down take about 15-20 minutes, then there's a cat track and a high-speed chair before the tram. Unless you're really fast, no time to stop, for anything. Springtime, when it's warm outside, I need at least a couple liters of water a day ("fortunately," our tram shuts down for an hour at lunchtime on weekdays, so I only have to carry a half-day's ration).

 

In Europe, you'd be hard pressed to find water fountains anywhere. You can fill up a bottle in the bathroom, but it's hard to know if that water's drinkable or not. I know from experience that tap below 2000 at our hill's OK (and that any higher it's not). Not sure I'd want to take that risk someplace I don't know.

You want to shell out for mineral water while you're skiing, that's your business. But it costs like a euro and a half for half a liter on the hill (as opposed to, like, 50 cents at the supermarket).

post #57 of 59
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post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post


No.   Read it again and you won't need a straw man argument.

Once again, for convenience:

 I have the mentality that  Camelbaks are  a FETISH  and that anyone who can drink 3 beers in one sitting can also drink one liter of water at the same sitting.   Or faster.

I also have the mentality that Camelbaks are a FETISH because people who object to being dehydrated and carry Camelbaks apparently still FAIL to drink enough.        Carrying a 3L Camelbak just to be able to drink 12-20 oz extra a day (i.e. less than 2 cans of soda) is the highest possible apex of FETISHISM.

I also have the mentality that the low levels of "dehydration" such as experienced by modern humans on ski slopes would have resulted in humans dying off long before Camelbaks were invented if they actually impaired human performance to the levels alleged.       Again, Camelbaks = FETISH.

I also have the mentality that non-stop sports (like randonee, tele touring or XC skiing) actually require intense levels of hydration (even at levels of 800ml-1.2 liters per hour) and therefore require use of something like Camelbaks, dehydration occuring nonetheless.   (And no bathroom stops required).     I have the mentality that most people have NO CONCEPT of how to drink this much water.

I have the mentality that, if a skier is working at lift-served alpine skiing even remotely as hard as someone else who is climbing 600-1000 vert per hour, the lift-riding skier needs lessons.    Badly.



 


comprex

the problem with your theory is that if you drink a liter of water, within the next 1-2 hours, your body is going to dispose of that water.  Either it's going to sweat it out, or it's going to create enough urine to bring your body back into homeostasis (your body doens't like to be too dilute).  so unless you plan on skiing for only a few hours, that liter of water is not going to last you the whole day (we're not camels--your body has no place to 'store' water).

secondly, you're right in that there's a range of dehydration that your body can tolerate.  But it's equally true that as you get to the limits of that range, it becomes pretty uncomfortable.

thirdly, I find that a camelbak is also particularly helpful at lunchtime, when I've ordered some burgers, but don't feel like spending $4 on a cup of soda. 

fourthly, if you gradually replace your fluid losses via camelback, your urine production will be lower, and you can avoid going to the bathroom all day.

what is a fetish, is this idea that you have to always be 'adequately hydrated.'  You don't have to drink liters and liters of water to be adequately hydrated.  You just need to not feel thirsty.  With a couple of sips from my camelback throughout the day, I seldom feel thirsty.  Thus, I am adequtely hydrating myself using my camelback.
post #59 of 59
Always! 
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