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SKIER TO SKIER RESCUES, of the not that gnarly type

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Pull people out of bomb holes
Prop someone up who has tipped over in the deep
Help someone flailing, exhausted, crying and screaming in frustration
Retrieving a ski or finding a ski for someone who is in deep ka ka if they can't get two skis back on

And all events of good will, random acts of kindness, and paying it forward 
This to illuminate the kinder side of some of our bad-asses.


(mine to be added later, gotta' go skiing!)
post #2 of 29

Last week while training a few guides for a VI(visually imparied)skier I came upon a small child upside down on the run crying. Approached her and asked if she was ok and where is dad. She stopped sobbing and said down there,pointing to a large man a few hundred yards down the hill. So I picked her up and told her I would take her to dad. I put her between my legs and off we went skiing along and laughing. Dad was very appreciative. I'm a sucker for little girls in Pink helmets. Looking forward to my next good deed.

post #3 of 29
The scene from Hot Dog when Dan pops up off the patrol sled with a case of beers to share comes to mind..
post #4 of 29
Ive helped clean up some yard sales in my day...thats about it.
post #5 of 29
I've helps many people over the years who end up in terrain well over their skiing ability level. Most of the time they've been on skis for less than 4 hours and their "friends" have suggested the area I find them in was suitable. In addition, they're usually found alone as their mates have either blasted off leaving their hapless victim behind, lunching or remained on less demanding runs.
post #6 of 29
 I stop anytime I see someone laying in the snow on advanced terrain to see if they need any help. I had someone today where there was 2 adults (husband and wife) and a kid who was probably about 12. I was on Upper Walking Boss at Loon and the mom was on the ground and the dad was looking on and the kid was standing funny. Turns out the kid had popped out of some rental boots and the parents couldn't figure out how to re-latch them. They were trying to get him back in the boot with the boot still in the ski. I suggested having him take his foot out because of all the snow on the rim of the boot. The mom pulled a handful of snow out and his sock was bunched up around his ankle. And they wondered why they couldn't re-latch the boot. Then putting the boot back on the kids skis started downhill with him trying to put his boot on. I had to jump in front and crossed my polls in front of his skis. They got the boot latched and I took off down the hill to avoid becoming part of the yard sale I'm sure that kid was going to have skiing on terrain well above his ability in crappy rental gear.
post #7 of 29
I helped a guy that was all tangled up with skis still on at Jackson Hole on a steep section of  the Cirque.  His legs and skis were tangled up in such away he was in great pain. Once I got him untangled without him sliding down the hill, I checked him out, and was able to get him back up his skis.  He was not hurt and skied down. 

I helped my friend retrieve his ski that popped off off on Tower 3 at Jackson Hole.  I found the ski and stuck in the snow.  I said if you want it here it is.  Hey what are friends for. 

I helped a mother figure out that the reason her daughter could not ski was because her daughter's ski boots were on the wrong feet.  She imediately blamed her husband who was not there. 
post #8 of 29
I was a Boy Scout, so ya 'help other people,', works for me.

Most memorable so far this season; 3 year old on the steps outside the lodge skis off in boots.  The kid fell head down and was hanging on to the bottom of the railing for all he was worth, Mom was a ways off.  So ya, you get the kid shiny side up and giggling till Mom gets there. 

Once that was all of us.
post #9 of 29

A pretty standard yard sale recovery on a steep pitch (saving the guy from a long climb to get his wife/girlfriend 's ski).  Only unusual thing was I saw them from the lift and specifically went to help them -- I was originally planning on going the other way at the top, but they were so pitiable.  After I retrieved the ski, I thought about teaching them how to put a ski on on steep terrain, but decided they were not in a mental place to learn something new.

My next lift ride up, they were still struggling to get their skis back on.

post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

A pretty standard yard sale recovery on a steep pitch (saving the guy from a long climb to get his wife/girlfriend 's ski).  Only unusual thing was I saw them from the lift and specifically went to help them -- I was originally planning on going the other way at the top, but they were so pitiable.  After I retrieved the ski, I thought about teaching them how to put a ski on on steep terrain, but decided they were not in a mental place to learn something new.

My next lift ride up, they were still struggling to get their skis back on.


I helped a woman out on a deep powder day. I had just finished the line I was skiing when I say a skier laying in the deep soft snow. It was  apparent by the location what had happened. There are washboards formed by drifts on some of the fast run outs. She hit one, launched right into the back of another one, face planted and double ejected.  Then as she struggled she got both legs post holed in 2.5 feet of snow. Then she struggled and her upper body fell down hill. So her feet were higher than her head. She would writhe a bid and then just lay back and cry. This was right under the lift. So I packed out her little spot with my skis, an area to stand on, an area to put skis down on. Then I pulled her up and out. She said that she was trying to put a ski back on when she sank into the snow again. She said it wouldn't click. I said: Well, you are hereby officially rescued and now I've gotta' go. There's a lot of snow on your boots. Start there. She was gone he next run, so all good.
post #11 of 29
One of my worst experiences actually ended up being my vest SAVE ever.

Working as an instructor at Homewood.   Had some free time and skied from top of Quad down to Lodge, came down the face and into the beginner area headed for the ski school.  Moving pretty well and just as I transitioned to the bottom I head a female screaming for all she was worth.  Stopped to locate her, as I was thinking the worst.   Located her sitting/half laying in the middle of the beginners hill, crying and screaming/sobbing at the top of her lungs.   Standing about 10 yards away was a male (husband, boyfriend eetc) berating her at the top of his lungs.

Skied down between them, picked her up off the snow and we did a double wedge to the bottom (only 100 ft).  Helped her out of her ski's and walked her into the Lodge and left her at the bar, bought her a Hot Buttered Rum (her request), got her calmed down.  Almost got fired over this one, but hey the key work was Almost.  My boss told he next time if I do this don't wear my instruct. coat, he heard her screaming too.
post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
so did you take off your jacket and then take her out? (ski instructor fantasy #126)
post #13 of 29
I helped some folks out once and they didn't even realize it. A couple was heading into an area clearly well above their ability...starts off easy but ends in expert pitches. I was skiing solo and simply asked if I could tag along (in front of a big sign says "ski with a partner"). I mentioned that I knew the area and could show them a fun way down. I then led them to the only way out that didn't involve expert pitches. Wasted run for me, but I knew I did them a big favor, so it was worth it.
post #14 of 29
I wish I had a six-pack for every car I've pulled out of the snow driving down the hill from work.  
post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoody View Post

I helped some folks out once and they didn't even realize it. A couple was heading into an area clearly well above their ability...starts off easy but ends in expert pitches. I was skiing solo and simply asked if I could tag along (in front of a big sign says "ski with a partner"). I mentioned that I knew the area and could show them a fun way down. I then led them to the only way out that didn't involve expert pitches. Wasted run for me, but I knew I did them a big favor, so it was worth it.

niiiice!

I helped a guy once that didn't yet know he was already in trouble:
a guy of intermediate level was near the top of our area on an advanced run. He was taking a picture of his son who was perched above him so that it looked like big time skiing. He wasn't getting far enough away from his subject, so he took off his skis. (?????) Then he was looking through the camera viewfinder and backing up to frame the shot. I saw him backing toward a steep, icy rollover. Any further and he was going to slide about 300 yards. As this was unfolding, I was just about to take my skis off to start a hike when all of this became clear to me. I called out: sir, please stop right there and I'll help you get the shot.  He was puzzled and looked around. What he saw behind him froze him to the spot. He went to his knees and tried to grab the mountain. I suggested he kick in his toes and not lean into the hill like that. He was too petrified to move a muscle, the very definition of gripped. So  I skied below him and supported his feet with my uphill ski until patrol arrived, at my beckon, to pull him up past the rollover.

It turned out well, and I made a couple points with patrol as they didn't have to deal with this guy sliding down the mountain in his boots.
post #16 of 29
Back in my single days I was known to be very attentive to "damsels in distress".  It was literally" picking up chicks".  Sorry if that isn't PC or whatever, but it was what it was.  It was especially effective if the girl's boyfriend had ditched her because she couldn't keep up.
post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Back in my single days I was known to be very attentive to "damsels in distress".  It was literally" picking up chicks".  Sorry if that isn't PC or whatever, but it was what it was.  It was especially effective if the girl's boyfriend had ditched her because she couldn't keep up.
 


what an insight! I am totally going to pay attention when guys are being a jerk with their girlfriend.
post #18 of 29
People who helped me:  1) Long ago driving home from Sugarloaf, I was on an unplowed road with 8" of heavy slush, and skidded off the edge into a snowbank.  I thought, I'll have to walk over to that farm, use the phone, call a tow truck, it's Sunday and how much will they charge me?  Talk about lucky.  At the farm there was a young fellow on a tractor who saw me go into the ditch, and he was on his way over before I even started walking.  Hooked up a chain and pulled me out in no time.  I gave him 10 bucks, which at the time was enough for a movie date.

2)  One person helped me, another hindered us both.  At Crotched Mountain, a bitterly cold night, not many people out.  I got on the shorter quad chair and dropped a pole.  As usual, they gave it to someone on a following chair to bring up to me.  Unfortunately there was one fellow on a chair between us who was probably drunk.  When I got off and looked back, this clown was lying full length on the chair and I think he was asleep!  They had to stop the lift and it took maybe 5 minutes to get him off. Meanwhile I was standing there freezing, as was the guy on the next chair with my pole.
post #19 of 29
Yesterday I was skiing at Copper going mach schnell on the flat runout to the Sierra lift.  There has been very little traffic over the flats as Jupiter Bowl has been closed except to two-three days of directed skiing.  I had a bit too much speed for the "terrain features" and decided to dump some by skiing off into some fresh snow.  I double ejected, became an unguided missle, and impaled the crusty snowpack head first, piercing the crust to the sugar below.  I was absolutely stuck with my feet in the air.  The sugar filled my mouth and nose, and I couldn't get enough air through the blockage.  I struggled with all my might to free my head, but I couldn't do it.  I managed to get a hand free to try to create an airspace, but my airway was blocked by snow.

Fortunately, two skiers saw my plight and dug me out.  I was about to pass out when they freed me.  I don't know who they are, but thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Mike
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
wow, crash stories are really the BEST! ^^^^^ to your lucky rescue.
post #21 of 29
I had one in Austria that started off really scary but ended up not so bad.

A family was following an instructor onto a little side trail with a bump on the entry that made a nice little jump. For some reason, they let the little girl ski at the back of the group. She misjudged the bump and went down pretty hard head first on the landing. I only saw it out of the corner of my eye, but even then it still looked bad. So, I watched for a few seconds. The kid wasn't moving at all, and the rest of the group had skied off without noticing.

So, I traversed the piste and climbed up a little bit of the drop-off from the side trail (my brother was wondering why on earth I was going through so much trouble to get to a trail that didn't look interesting to ski). The girl's legs were twisted up pretty badly, and she had a bit of blood on her face. So, of course, I was pretty scared she might be seriously hurt. I also didn't know if she spoke English, so I didn't think she would even understand me if I had to say anything. So many things running through the brain, I was getting myself pretty worried.

Luckily, she wasn't really hurt, just shocked. I popped her skis off so she could untangle her legs and sit up to catch her breath. She started to calm down once the shock wore off, which was about the time the instructor came skating up around the corner. I was pretty relieved in the end. It looked much worse than it was.

On the plus side, it gave me an excuse to ski through the trees on the drop-off back to the main piste, which was fun (but short).
post #22 of 29
Does it count if I used my avi shovel to pull out a lady (in her car) from the snow she had parked into?








When, after 15 minutes of attempts she started to protest that I was wasting time and should go my own way, she would have walked home and got some of the family to help, I replied "Ma'am, somehow, I've got to earn my way to the Heaven's doors"
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post

Does it count if I used my avi shovel to pull out a lady (in her car) from the snow she had parked into?








When, after 15 minutes of attempts she started to protest that I was wasting time and should go my own way, she would have walked home and got some of the family to help, I replied "Ma'am, somehow, I've got to earn my way to the Heaven's doors"

Everyone here:  Payin' it forward, always,  payin' it forward     niiiice   
post #24 of 29
Here's a great chance to say "THANK YOU" to all the patrollers out there...I'd recall remember getting helped by a red jacketed guy if the concussion hadn't been so bad.
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
I'm down with that: THANKS RED JACKET DUDES AND CHICKS. talk about a helping others profession, and of the totally gnarly type. truly moves me.
post #26 of 29
Ok, an on snow (run) ski related one:
Skiing down an, usually closed run at xxx (closed for preservation reasons, not for particular dangers apart it being difficult and icy, since it is used to host the DH event of the military - or police forces, never remember exactly which of the two - national ski championship) on a narrow portion there's a man standing on the edge of the run looking "out" without attempting to do anything, simply waiting for something to happen, I look down off  the side of the run and there's his daughter, stranded in the middle of ungroomed soft snow...we ask him why he isn't doing anything...His reply..."I don't know what to do, I don't know how to get there"...as it turned out, both were beginners...so we went down to the girl and put her to her feet, helped her putting on her skis and brought her back to the run...
Nothing dramatic, but the way the man was standing there surprised me...Both had clearly no place being there....why they took that run...a mystery.
Anyway, anytime someone is lying down and see equipment laying around, I always make a point of stopping and at least asking if all is ok. Sometimes the replies are a nice "yes, thank you", sometimes drier (like the person is wondering why I am asking, as if I'd have an "hidden agenda") but I don't care...99% of times everything is fine, then that 1% there's something to do...
So, it happened last December when I saw three people, one lying down and two watching him...skis lying around. Stopped and asked the usual question, and instead of getting "all is fine thank you" I got, his shoulder, he's hurt". Oookay, having no medical background, first thing I say "Then put his skis in the snow to for a cross, some distance above us, to signal that there's an accident" (it was a medium steep portion, with all sort ofo people zooming around, sometime too close) after we did that I checked if the guy was being kept warn, then one of his friend told me that they'd had already called the patrol, good. As soon as the skis were crossed into the snow, at least an instructor saw the sign and stopped to ask. Then I lest, seeing that the situation was stable, the guy care of by his friends, the toboggan coming down with the patrollers...
post #27 of 29
Two weeks ago my wife stayed with a guy who had snowboarded into a tree at Loveland, while I went for patrol.  He was briefly unconscious, broke a tooth and seemed to have a leg injury.  Didn't hear the final assessment of his condition, but later saw him being sledded out.
post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 
On  west face I came to a guy that was just coasting to a stop after sliding probably a hundred yards over firm bumps at around 35 to 40 degrees. He was dazed and I spoke to him and got him togerther so that slowly he knew where he was. It  helps a person out when they have just had a concussion.

Actually, getting to someone that just took a hard fall you will often notice the dazed condition and I've been able so settle a few people down.
post #29 of 29
My son, who at the time was a teen and skiied much faster, had stopped at the side of a trail and waited til I came by to yell at me to come and HELP.
It seem a young teen on a snow board had gone out of control, and slid into the woods off the side of the trail. And managed to hit her unhelmeted head on a snow gun on the way.

She was laying there. Not terribly responsive. Another woman also had stopped and was kneeling by her. Now, I am in the medical profession( not a doc)  and that is why my son "assigned" me.

The kid was bleeding from the back of her head. I scrapped down at the snow to see how far the bleeding went. Pretty far, as head wounds will do. I put pressure on it and made sure my son was out flagging everyone to alert patrol.

The girl would not respond verbally. Her pulse was fine. Her body a bit rigid. My surmise and sense.......extreme fear. She wasn't unconscious, but in pain and afraid. Turned out to be accurate. I just spoke to her and told her she had a cut, but that over all she was okay. Help on the way etc, etc.

Patrol offered me a free ski ticket. Went to collect and found my younger in kid the patrol sick area with a swollen thumb. I never asked for the ticket.
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