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Putting Lifters on a Pair of Fatties

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I just picked up a pair of Armada ANT's and damn, these boys are big. So now i'm considering my mounting options and i was thinking about mounting my marker bindings on a 12mm riser plate that i have sitting around to improve edge to edge performance and give me a bit more leverage on these big boards. Unfortunately,  the ANT's are going to have to act as my one ski quiver at least til next year when i can afford another pair of skis, something with a bit more sidecut and less gusto under foot. A little about myself: I'm 6'2, 175, i'm a retired college racer (22yrs old, peaked early :)) living in the PNW. So what's the consensus on risers on pow skis? It seems to make sense to me: big ass ski, throw on risers for added leverage. Does anyone out there have some firsthand experience on the subject? The plates are 1 solid chunk, not separate pieces for the toe and heels. Is that going to compromise the way the ski was designed to ride? I figured there's enough ski that i wouldn't even notice the difference, but I might be wrong. As a sidenote, i plan on mounting them with a pretty "classic" pair of Marker bindings and some modified brakes. Classy, i know...
post #2 of 11
 My opinion is that you want to mount as flat to the ski as possible in these cases, for added stability.  Having tried various options, I much prefer a flat mount for freeride / off-piste skiing.  So I would not add lifters.  And you are correct that they will stiffen up the middle of the ski.  I even noticed that with RailFlex bindings that have a break in the middle of the mounting rail.  How much depends on many factors I suppose.

Somewhere I had posted a spreadsheet that shows the effect of lift versus ski width on edging a ski, and I recall that it very much begins to diminish for waist widths above 80mm for average sized people.  Basically, it's a lever situation, with snow to knee height on one end of the lever and ski width on the other.  As ski width creeps up, the effect of lift starts to diminish.

I am thinking on a ski as wide as the ANT, lift really isn't going to help edging a whole lot, and on the flip side, your soft snow, powder, off-piste stability will be compromised.  So I'd go flat for sure.
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christopher Casjen Shisler View Post

So what's the consensus on risers on pow skis? It seems to make sense to me: big ass ski, throw on risers for added leverage. Does anyone out there have some firsthand experience on the subject?
 
The consensus seems to be mount flat.  I don't know if that is because of fashion or function, but I hate flat mounted skis.  I have put AT bindings which are sky high on fat skis, and prefer that position.  I'd add those risers in a second.
post #4 of 11
I got a fat for me ski for the first time this year.  Salomon Teneighty's.  (used for 160.00)  I got them with bindings attached.  I was surprised that they had no interface, or risers.  I left them as they were, a "flat mount".   They ski great.  I guess they are not that wide, but I just saw a friends new 110mm under foot boards, and they were raised only a little.   I thought with the flat mount it might be a little harder to get from edge to edge on my new "wider" skis, but it seems to work just fine.   All my other sticks are mid 60's under foot, and have lift.  I really can't tell a lot of difference.
After reading what Newfydog said, I think you will be OK either way.  I think Newfydog knows what he's talking about.  Maybe raise them, but don't conecet them so the ski will not get too stiff under foot.
post #5 of 11
I have had risers under Rossi turntable bindings on my Gotamas, Mantras and Shamans. Makes hard snow skiing much easier, I had an earlier pair of Gotams mounted with Marker Duke bindings that had a lot of lift. Transformed the Gotamas  on hard snow. It made them much more versatile. So now all my fat skis have risers. My knees never hurt but I do weight lifting on a regular basis. Back squats and deadlifts with proper form have transformed my knees into something that feels a lot younger than 59. I say go for the risers.
post #6 of 11
 +1 for as flat as possible. 
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

 +1 for as flat as possible. 

 

+2

SJ
post #8 of 11

I know they're different skis, but I have two pair of Sanouks - one mounted with 916s and one mounted with Dukes. I honestly can't tell the difference between the two.Also keep in mind that I very seldom ski groomers and when I do I usually don't turn too much.

I'd say go for it if you want. I don't think it will make any difference, but I may very well be wrong.

post #9 of 11
I have risers on my fat skis. I've never noticed any lack of stability induced by the risers in soft snow and I do think they aid carving and edgegrip on hardpack. I'm a big guy (200+ lbs) on big skis, maybe that's why the lifters are not a problem for me.

Michael
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
I have to say i'm leaning toward a partial rise, maybe 7-9mm. It seems that the benefits of on piste riding outweigh the subtractions that come with skiing on powder with lifters. Thanks guys.
post #11 of 11
I'm using 9mm risers with Head Mojo 15 bindings. These binding can use 130mm, 115mm or 95mm brakes. These risers work with all Tyrolia bindings, except Railflex.

The riser is low cost and well made: http://www.levelninesports.com/tyrolia-2006-carve-plate-9mm-slr-silver-p-80.html
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