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WHICH SKI SHOULD I BUY TO PATROL IN PA

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hi, I am 47 years old 6 foot 1 and weigh 255 lbs. I have been skiing since I have been a kid in the North East. I use to ski 100 days a year in Killington.

I use to ski on 210 GS Race Skis in Killington and one of the reps talked me into skiing a 173 and 182 Volkl P 60 GC and I ended up buying both. I first bought the 173 and it was a great all around ski, but when I started to really wick it up, it was not so stable anymore, then I purchased the 182.

The thing is this, I am now patroling at Shawnee Mountain in PA and the 183 is a little tiring after awhile. So what I am trying to find out is this, what skiis do you suggest and why! I love the edge hold of my volkls.

Thank you for your help in advance.

Regards,

Siggy
post #2 of 21
I can't guess your conditions but probably not lots different from the little hill where I patrol in suburban Detroit.  We've some steeps and bumps with good mix of natural to man-made snow that's wind-whipped and often icy.

So, Siggy, you might want to look at my current ride -- a pair of wicked good Nordica Dobermann SL Pros in 165 length w/13.5 turn radius (next size up is 170/14r). It's a good, stiff, exceptionally light ski that carves like the dickens. 'course that's all new to me, who learned to ski knees-and-boots-together on a pair of 215 Harts  back in the day, but a short, stiff, shaped carver works as I now learn new way to ski.

I'm not quite your size (tho used to be), just hit 65 and skiing more than ever (3+/wk).  Truth is I've skiied very little since first knee surgery in '81, but bilateral TKR in Jan '06 has turned my winters into a second spring.
 
You'll find the Dobermann's on the NSP pro site. Still pricey at $650 there, but mine just developed a potentially serious base-edge issue, a year out of warranty, and our Nordica friends are replacing them. Hard to beat that kind of customer service.  Good luck with  your search.
post #3 of 21
The easiest, most forgiving ski available. When I was on Patrol, i always skied on Rossi Bandits. Mainly becaause they're no brainer all mountain skis that held well on ice and allowed me to not have to think about skiing,  rather the opportunity to do my job.

Problem these days, many skis are twinntip or turned up tails which aren't easy to jam into the snow to mark accident scenes or to block off a trail. especially in Eastern hardpack. And there's no sense spending big bucks on skis that will get run over, stepped on and whacked around by sleds and snowmobiles.

That said. It's your choice but this is some food for thought. Plus, I always kept a couple favorite boards in my locker for times I wasn't on patrol. Hope this helped.
post #4 of 21

Second a non-twin tip easy to skid ski.   I have Atomic Nomad Blackeyes and Volkl Racetiger SL's 

twin tips have another bad habit----that of spraying your sled passenger.
 
I ski my racetigers usually, which are similar in design to the Nordicas mentioned above, but when training  new guys I use a pair of Atomic blackeye's that are a lot easier to ski on......not as fun on my small hill as the SL's but easier on the body and better for sled training since the slip better and don;t want to be constantly edged.

post #5 of 21
Though I am not a patroller, I usually ski 4-8 hours non stop
when I do outings. I would recommend Head Monster Chips
or the now Chip 78.

They are a very easy ski to use, perform admirably
in many conditions and the Chip will noticably tame the
ski at speed. I feel it is one of the easiest ski to use, however
will hold an edge like no other when you turn up the volume.

I am 6'4 and 240lb athletic/football build.
post #6 of 21
twins are nice out west but back east I would think an ac50 type ski would be good, you don't want to be eating if you do get a big dump of snow. you'd have to be crazy to use race skis out here. I can rock a slalom ski but, the first time i had to set a boo line out in a big field of frozen chunder I had zero fun.
post #7 of 21

Hey Siggy,

 

I am in the same boat.  I too, am a patroller and looking for an upgrade.  Currently I ski on a pair of blizzard XO.  I have had them for years and this particular ski; is good for beginners, but I want a ski that I will have a little more fun with skiing bumps and the powdery stuff I eventually want to ski through.  I ski at a tiny mountain in PA also (Spring mountain) What skis have u been considering? I have been thinking about fischer wateas and I was gonna look on the NSP site at the dynastars and maybe rossy freerides.

post #8 of 21

Though not a patrol, I do have a bunch of patrollers coming into the shop I work at checking out the Rossi Avengers.  Really awesome set up skis, so I'd check them out.

 

AC50's are an awesome ski but they're extremely stiff, even stiffer than many race skis.  AC30's will probably a better ski for you if you like the Volkl design better than the Rossi one.

post #9 of 21

I think the 30 may be a bit on the narrow side for patrol work. I'm a bigger guy so the 50 doesn't usually feel too stiff to me but take it with a grain of salt. I own the 82 avengerTi and love the ski. The carbon is a litttle more lively and easier to ski for 90% of skiers. The Head Peak 78 or 88  would likely be good for east too. I have a Peak 78, like it, very carvy prolly not my first choice for west.

   I've been impressed at how well the Avenger ski's a variety of skills, speeds and turn shapes. It has performed very well in pow as well.

post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post

Second a non-twin tip easy to skid ski.   I have Atomic Nomad Blackeyes and Volkl Racetiger SL's 

twin tips have another bad habit----that of spraying your sled passenger.
 
I ski my racetigers usually, which are similar in design to the Nordicas mentioned above, but when training  new guys I use a pair of Atomic blackeye's that are a lot easier to ski on......not as fun on my small hill as the SL's but easier on the body and better for sled training since the slip better and don;t want to be constantly edged.


J, if you get a chance, see if you can't demo the Fischer RC4 Worldcup SC against your Racetigers for patrol work.
post #11 of 21

No twin tip, good edge hold but not too stiff, not too shaped (not a carver), not too long (a little shorter is better), not too wide or too narrow (actual width varies regionally), and not too expensive because you'll beat them up.  K2 makes some skis that are good for patrolling and they are often generous with patrol discounts.  

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

No twin tip, good edge hold but not too stiff, not too shaped (not a carver), not too long (a little shorter is better), not too wide or too narrow (actual width varies regionally), and not too expensive because you'll beat them up.  K2 makes some skis that are good for patrolling and they are often generous with patrol discounts.  


I believe that! that sounds like the perfect description

post #13 of 21

Gee why would a patroller want a twin-tip?  I mean when does a patroller need to drift easy, side slip, make backward falling leafs in bumps, crud and trees???  Oh wait a minute-they need that everyday.  

 

Guys, a moderately stiff twin tip with decent edge-hold is the golden tool for patrolling.  I like the Icelantic Pilgrims a lot.  I had a K2 extreme that worked great  Also look at the faux twin-tips-skis with a moderately turned up tail (like the stokli rotor).

 

Really, I can't believe people are recommending super-stiff sl skis (like the doberman) as an everyday Patrol ski.  Sure, they're Not bad for those icy early season days-but hardly a sensible year long patroller ride. 

 

I like lars's Idea of a soft, easy skiing ski, as well.

 

I use three skis-one is a big fat twin, one is a mid fat twin-like ski, and one is a 75mm carver with a stiff, flat tail.  Running sleds and sweeping trees in the dark, are easier on the twins-especially in funky conditions and terrain.

 

Or,  just get a ski you really enjoy skiing.

 

post #14 of 21

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post

Gee why would a patroller want a twin-tip?  I mean when does a patroller need to drift easy, side slip, make backward falling leafs in bumps, crud and trees???  Oh wait a minute-they need that everyday.  


But then there are the problems with sticking the tails in hard snow at an accident scene, and spraying a rooster-tail of snow on your patient when you're pulling a toboggan.  You don't need a twin tip - a little practice will help you with doing the falling leaf on a flat tail ski, and sideslipping isn't any easier with a twin tip.  

post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post

Gee why would a patroller want a twin-tip?  I mean when does a patroller need to drift easy, side slip, make backward falling leafs in bumps, crud and trees???  Oh wait a minute-they need that everyday.  


But then there are the problems with sticking the tails in hard snow at an accident scene, and spraying a rooster-tail of snow on your patient when you're pulling a toboggan.  You don't need a twin tip - a little practice will help you with doing the falling leaf on a flat tail ski, and sideslipping isn't any easier with a twin tip.  



Of course you don't need them-hell, you can patrol on old sh*tty straight skis if you want.  I can do a falling leaf on any skis, but when drifting backwards up a chunky mogul with a loaded sled, a softer turned up tail makes for a very easy, smooth ride.  Like I said, some days I'm on my stiff, flat-tailed Contact 4x4's-they work fine, but require a little more finesse and focus in three-dimensional sled running situations.  IF I only had one pair of skis to patrol on...it wouldn't be those skis (though I enjoy skiing them quite a bit).

 

The question is about what is Ideal---and, while sl skis are fun to torch the groomers with and can in a pinch be pressed into patroller service, they are hardly the best choice (which is what the OP is looking for).  I put my poles in the snow usually anyway as I don't like punching any ski though the snow (and half the time, the surfaces are to firm to punch through skis anyway).  The spray on a patient is a legit concern.  When the snow gets deep, heavy, funky and bumpy, an easy drifting ski makes for an easier ride-and that's a benefit to a backboarded patient in any situation.

 

A number of guys on my Patrol are using those medium stiffness, all-purpose mid-fats like the Sultan 85, and the Rossi SC86-they seem to run the gamut of varying patroller tasks pretty darn well in just about every condition.

 

And did you just recommend K2's???  They make nothing but fatter twin tips (most with rocker).  I think those K2 Extremes make a great all-purpose, any day, every day patroller ski.

 

But in the end-I'll go with this recommendation-ski the kind of skis you enjoy skiing the most-you're spending all day on them-ski what you enjoy.  You like short carvers? get 'em.  If you like floaty soft skis, get those.  Something in between?  Just about every manufacture makes a number of skis to fit that bill as well (Honestly, use your pro-forms and get a few skis-that's one of the best parts of working on a mountain!).

post #16 of 21

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post

...And did you just recommend K2's???  They make nothing but fatter twin tips (most with rocker).  

 

roflmao.gif

post #17 of 21

 

 

Just re-checked K2 website-almost every single ski has some-sort rocker and almost everyone with some level of turned up tail (except the lower ed models, of course..and the T9's--but I think the OP is a full-sized and and not a lady.).

 

BTW, I don't think that's a bad thing (as stated above)-a little tip rocker, like a little tail up turning, makes for a smooth running sled ski in funky, three-D conditions.  

 

Laugh if you want, Dinosaur.

 

Hey Siggy,

 

All I'm saying is if you like the feel of race skis-get one and love it.  If you want something to make Patrol work just a little easier, check out something softer with an easier releasing tail (twin tips fit this bill, and so do a lot of other skis).

 

 

 

post #18 of 21

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post

Just re-checked K2 website-almost every single ski has some-sort rocker and almost everyone with some level of turned up tail (except the lower ed models, of course..and the T9's--but I think the OP is a full-sized and and not a lady.).

 

BTW, I don't think that's a bad thing (as stated above)-a little tip rocker, like a little tail up turning, makes for a smooth running sled ski in funky, three-D conditions.  

 

Laugh if you want, Dinosaur.

 

Hey Siggy,

 

All I'm saying is if you like the feel of race skis-get one and love it.  If you want something to make Patrol work just a little easier, check out something softer with an easier releasing tail (twin tips fit this bill, and so do a lot of other skis).

 

A little turned up tail /= twin tip, and race skis aren't the only alternative to twin-tips.  

 

I patrol ~70 days a year, mostly on some backcountry-oriented Volkls with a pair of fatter Black Diamonds for powder days - no twin tip.  Pretty much no one on the patrol where I work uses twin tips, at least in part for the reasons I stated earlier - difficulty sticking them in the snow and spraying patients.  

post #19 of 21

You people do realize the OP is patrolling at Shawnee Mt. in PA.  They have 700 (exagerated) vertical feet and an annual snow fall of 50 inches.  I don't think it really matters what he skis on. Pick something fun and deal with it.

post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post

You people do realize the OP is patrolling at Shawnee Mt. in PA.  They have 700 (exagerated) vertical feet and an annual snow fall of 50 inches.  I don't think it really matters what he skis on. Pick something fun and deal with it.



absolutely correct in my opinion

post #21 of 21


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post

Second a non-twin tip easy to skid ski.   I have Atomic Nomad Blackeyes and Volkl Racetiger SL's 

twin tips have another bad habit----that of spraying your sled passenger.
 
I ski my racetigers usually, which are similar in design to the Nordicas mentioned above, but when training  new guys I use a pair of Atomic blackeye's that are a lot easier to ski on......not as fun on my small hill as the SL's but easier on the body and better for sled training since the slip better and don;t want to be constantly edged.




J, if you get a chance, see if you can't demo the Fischer RC4 Worldcup SC against your Racetigers for patrol work.


 



Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post

You people do realize the OP is patrolling at Shawnee Mt. in PA.  They have 700 (exagerated) vertical feet and an annual snow fall of 50 inches.  I don't think it really matters what he skis on. Pick something fun and deal with it.


Ever tried to run boo on a race ski in early morning frozen side of the run crud?

Demo'd the dynastar sultan 85 and 94 at Snowbird this week and like both very much and think that the 85 would likely be a great ski to work on in the east.

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