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PASSING SKIERS, what's the best way?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I know you're going to tell me to ski faster

I really hate being crowded or pressured by other skiers.

There's 4,000 acres out there, why the close pass?

If you're buzzing or trying to make an impression, don't. You can't impress me (or other skiers) and buzzing sucks.

Give people some space, chill, spread out. respect one another. Be cool.
post #2 of 22
I think the people that buzz you simply don't understand the concept of someone else's space. It is all their own space in their minds and you are unfortunately in it.

I like to pass skiers on the slope by being behind them and then skiing away from them as I pass. That way if they choose to change direction erratically, it will be more or less the same direction as me and I'll have some space and time to react or exactly the opposite direction and it won't matter.

On cat tracks and roads, I will go as far away to one side or another as I can and click my poles. I have found that 'on your left/right' just makes people look and turn in that direction. My pole clicks let them know I'm there and I just avoid them. I take full responsibility for my passing and will stop or slow down to apologize if I get close enough to someone to illicit any sort of negative reaction.
post #3 of 22
I slow down and gauge their turns, right as they start a left turn (for example) I pass them on the right.

Often I just have to slow down and make short turns to stay behind someone if the trail is narrow or if their turns are hard to predict.  There are worse things in the world then slowing down for a little while.  I just don't risk passing someone if there's ANY chance of a collision.
post #4 of 22
 MR, problem with pole clicking (which I still do) is that so many bozos are skiing with headphones these days that they don't hear anything.

Another example of self-absorbed "it's my space" behavior.
post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post
 I have found that 'on your left/right' just makes people look and turn in that direction.

I can remember a few times where Ive done that while passing a beginner, and they would look in my direction, get distracted and fall. I felt bad, but I was trying to be courteous.
post #6 of 22
The pole clicks are the best thing I've come up with without using my voice as I do it whenever I approach someone and it is progressively louder and doesn't illicit a reply. I want to give the passee an awareness of the presense of another skier without verbalizing which seems to me to be more distracting for the passee as they actually try to figure out what I'm saying: did he say on your right or go right?. On my bike I use a bell to get attention then seal the deal by saying 'passing', but there the side to pass on is well defined by the rules of the road.

The problem of headphones and helmets providing audio isolation is always on my mind. I always assume I'm not heard and that the passee is in la-la land.
post #7 of 22
On the cat tracks will try to pass way on the uphill side.  Do the pole click thing too, if they can not hear not my fault. 

A related tale and   a bit of a high jack.

PSIA Fall clinic long ago at Eldora (late 60's).  10 or 12 of us standing facing clinic instructor being cool.  Last participant skis down sets edge above to spray us all , catches edge and falls into the group , we looked like domino's in ski school coats. Remember that Roger Staub was in our group that day. 

The moral, stop below a group, cause s&%t happens.
post #8 of 22
Headphones should be outlawed on the ski hill IMO. Its dangerous. Its illegal to drive with them where I'm from, they should not be allowed on the slopes either.
You need to be able to hear what's going on around you....plus I like to listen to the sounds of skiing!
post #9 of 22
The best way to pass other skiers is to run them over!!! Muahahaha!!! jkjk
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by 51Phantom View Post

Headphones should be outlawed on the ski hill IMO. Its dangerous. Its illegal to drive with them where I'm from, they should not be allowed on the slopes either.
You need to be able to hear what's going on around you....plus I like to listen to the sounds of skiing!

Ahhh, but China Cat Sunflower going into I Know You Rider when you're just milling down a traverse.

OK, I don't use tunes going downhill for the same reason (but if I did, then....)
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

I like to pass skiers on the slope by being behind them and then skiing away from them as I pass. That way if they choose to change direction erratically, it will be more or less the same direction as me and I'll have some space and time to react or exactly the opposite direction and it won't matter.

 
post #12 of 22

 

If you were on a trail?

If you were on a slope?
I am always playing the where is that guy going to go game as I overtake people.  I try to stay as far away as possible, but inevitably you are going to blow by someone a little to close for comfort.  It happens!  Its almost NEVER done on purpose.

I have had a few react very badly as I passed close buy.
I even got so mad at one guy that I used my skill a bit later to crash him.  (I hope I never lose control like that again)

My Advise
RELAX it’s not a conspiracy to make you uncomfortable.  Shit happens,
Just take a breath and have a fun forgiving attitude.
post #13 of 22
I agree (about the headphones/ipods/etc).....  In the past I used them for night skiing or mid-week when the trails were virtually empty, but they really should not be used *especially* with crowds around.  I don't use them anymore. 
post #14 of 22
Bozos who buzz other skiers in a big open bowl are toolboxes.

As far as passing on cat tracks or other confined areas, I personally just blast past as fast as possible to limit the amount of close proximity. As others have said, shouting your intentions or pole clicking will at best fall on Ipodded ears or at worst cause a gaper to panick and explode.
post #15 of 22
Not necessarily on the topic of passing (I try to make as much noise with poles and pass as they turn the other way.)  But regarding music while skiing.

I enjoy listening while skiing, but hate the isolation headphones give, thus iI've started skiing with a single earbud, one ear for music, one ear for the people crashing into me.  http://www.scansound.com/single-stereo-earbud.htm  for those looking for the best of both.
post #16 of 22
On skis I'll do the pole click.
If you want a real treat try going uphill on a blue trail on a snomobile,on a weekend.
post #17 of 22
I'm with Jer (pun intended)
Watch the slower person as you approach then pick a spot/time for quick, controlled, dash by as far away as the terrain allows (usually in the fluff on the edge).  Some folks get a bit startled because they might not have seen me or heard me coming up quickly.  It might be perceived as "buzzing" if someone happens to meander over to the side and line I was working, but trust me.  I saw you and picked a quick, safe opportunity to slide on by.  Going out of your way to cut someone off is what buzzing really is. If you get a round without hindering their path at all and ensure that they have plenty of space to continue in whatever direction they might want to you are still within the responsibility code of allowing the right of way to the downhill skier... assuming you are under full control.

Jib jabbing along behind someone taking too long to pick an opening or trying to ask permission to pass makes things more dangerous because often someone else comes up behind you waiting you waiting on them and complicates what should have been a quick, easy traffic decision. 
post #18 of 22
I saw someone with one of those bells you attach to your bike handlebars mounted on one of his ski poles the other day.  You might try that...
post #19 of 22
I just make sure that at their speed and my speed there is no way they can intercept me when I pass them no matter which way the suddenly decide to turn.    Sometimes I have to throw them sideways for a while and follow them down a narrow trial.   There's always another the next run, and it's not worth risking life an limb over it, or getting upset.
post #20 of 22
 Everything changes once you've had a collision where someone gets injured. 

Caution becomes much more important, speed less so.  Not that I don't like speed, but on crowded slopes, or passing people the need to get by quickly becomes moderated by the memory of the collision.

At least that's my experience.
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I just make sure that at their speed and my speed there is no way they can intercept me when I pass them no matter which way the suddenly decide to turn.    Sometimes I have to throw them sideways for a while and follow them down a narrow trial.   There's always another the next run, and it's not worth risking life an limb over it, or getting upset.
 

quoted for truth: I'd say that your technique for passing has to provide that you are never the hitter. there is need for  patience and respect of the other skiers. and help people feel free and easy out in the huge mountains. SMILES AND SPACE  this is no subway rush.
post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post

Bozos who buzz other skiers in a big open bowl are toolboxes.

As far as passing on cat tracks or other confined areas, I personally just blast past as fast as possible to limit the amount of close proximity. As others have said, shouting your intentions or pole clicking will at best fall on Ipodded ears or at worst cause a gaper to panick and explode.

I can no longer even conceive of passing someone for effect.

Where I ski, a little humility goes a long way.
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