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WHAT TECHNOLOGY ADVANCE HAS IMPROVED SKIING THE MOST? - Page 2

post #31 of 46

The Interstate highway system.  It opened a whole new world of mountain skiing to a midwesterner.

post #32 of 46
What about snow making systems? Without them many ski areas would not exist with the lack of natural coverage.
post #33 of 46
Thread Starter 
"The Interstate highway system.  It opened a whole new world of mountain skiing to a midwesterner."

It also  brought skiers more quickly to Adirondack, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine resorts too. Some Colorado and California resorts might be a lot small today if not for the Interstates.

Along this line, the plethora of 4x4 vehicles skiers can afford?
Edited by FreddyOneski - 12/23/09 at 7:04pm
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreddyOneski View Post

"The Interstate highway system.  It opened a whole new world of mountain skiing to a midwesterner."

It also  brought skiers more quickly to Adirondack, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine resorts too. Some Colorado and California resorts might be a lot small today if not for the Interstates.

Along this line, the plethora of 4x4 vehicles skiers can afford?

 


I have to disagree on the roads. check the current Squaw Valley website, I think they have a picture of the parking lot in the 50's. already a  hardcore of skiers on 2 lane roads with big old Oldsmobile stationwagons.
post #35 of 46
Metallurgy, from the steel edges through to the metal topsheets.
post #36 of 46
Interesting thread.  Makes you think.  I started with cable bindings and lace ski boots.  My next investment was buckle Henke ski boots.  That made my life a lot easier.  I broke my tibia and fibula in 1964 with  cable bindings and side toe release. After recovery I purchased Tiroli step in heel releasable binding.  I still had my ankle high leather buckle Henke ski boots.   My skis had metal edges that were screwed onto the base of the ski with these little tiny screws.  I skied on that equipment about 3 times a year until 1982.  My next big investment was Lange ski boots.  Wow what a difference. 

Here is my two cents from east coast point of view from high to low priority.
  1. tucker snow cat - the early work horse tractor of the ski industry
  2. chair lift
  3. buckle ski boots (if you ever had lace boots you know how important this was)
  4. roto-tiller groomer  (this is more important than snowmaking for east coast)
  5. snowmaking extended ski season on east coast by 33% (many thanks to Orville and David Slutsky at Hunter Mountain)
  6. plastic ski boot technology (many many thanks to Lange)
  7. releasable fixed heel binding  (free heelers just needed the plastic boots)
  8. metal edges on skis
  9. Laminate and glue technology
  10. shaped, shorter,  and wide ski technology (many thanks to Burton and snowboarders)

Edited by catskills - 12/24/09 at 6:48am
post #37 of 46
Without a doubt for us Eastern skiers its snowmaking and grooming technology.  I continue to marvel at what can be done after a rain/freeze cyle.  This winter, Killlington went from a few strips of snow at the end of November to some great skiing on 50 of trails in only two weeks. 
post #38 of 46
"Do it for the internet."
post #39 of 46
Lots of valid mentions in this thread.  Many before my time, as first serious ski season was 1978-79.

For me personally:
custom footbeds (bought 1981, still going strong)
fat skis (first bought 1996, powder days were a total crapshoot for me before then)
post #40 of 46

Bogner stretch ski pants!

.
post #41 of 46
First railroads then interstate highways then cheap air fares, without a way to get the masses to the mountains none of the other innovation would have mattered.

Then I would say metal edges, lifts, releasable bindings, plastic boots, snowmaking, grooming, warm light weight functional clothing, snowboards and deep side cuts.
post #42 of 46
For my wife, modern ski clothes and hand/toe warmers has made skiing much more enjoyable.
post #43 of 46
(OUT WEST) It HAS to be the fat ski, 95mm +. check this. with a fat ski in good powder you could dispense with some of these other nominations. The fat ski in good powder would not  need metal edges, so out with metal edges. And you could drive a fat ski in good powder with a decent leather boot, or mountaineering boot, so out with plastic boots. If you lived in snow country, you could grab good turns on any hill covered in powder without highways, ski lifts, groomers, nylon, safety bindings, a helmet, and so on.
post #44 of 46
..........and if we had wings we all would fly and have no need for fat skis.
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

(OUT WEST) It HAS to be the fat ski, 95mm +. check this. with a fat ski in good powder you could dispense with some of these other nominations. The fat ski in good powder would not  need metal edges, so out with metal edges. And you could drive a fat ski in good powder with a decent leather boot, or mountaineering boot, so out with plastic boots. If you lived in snow country, you could grab good turns on any hill covered in powder without highways, ski lifts, groomers, nylon, safety bindings, a helmet, and so on.
You still need a solid boot to drive a big ski.  I found my Garmont Adrenaline AT boot insufficient to drive my Volkl Sumo Marker Duke setup in early season powder.
post #46 of 46
LHC:  Wait a minute. You had me going a second. But wings are not ski tech. Except maybe those skimmers and squirrel suit guys and gals.





Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post



You still need a solid boot to drive a big ski.  I found my Garmont Adrenaline AT boot insufficient to drive my Volkl Sumo Marker Duke setup in early season powder.

 

That's totally true. I was exagerating. When I bought my first  pair of 195cm Atomic RS's in the 80's I had to buy new boots after discovering I couldn't drive the ski. But really, you COULD drive a watea 114 with an old school boot in perfect powder. It's a useless fact or idea in support of fat skis being the thing that changed skiing.

When I took my first run on Snow Rangers, not fat by today's standards in the low 80s or so, I stopped at the bottom of a good, deep run and said to my friend: those guys were holding out on me. why didn't they say how easy this is? It's just way too easy.  and pushed off to really relax and enjoy powder like never before. and no looking back after that realization.  


My first (banana boot) Nordicas, up at Snowbird, hurt so badly that while I knew it was the future, I could not immediately enjoy the idea.

I ride a 130 boot for the reasons you put forth.
Edited by davluri - 12/27/09 at 10:32am
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