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How to shorten poles?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I have a pair of Goode graphite shaft poles that are too long. Anyone know a good ( pardon the pun) way to remove the grips in order to get to the shaft? There is a small screw at the top, but, removing it does not make removal of the grips easy.
I do have the tools needed to cut the poles cleanly.
post #2 of 25
I have used boiling water to loosen the adhesive to remove grips on aluminum poles
post #3 of 25
on aluminum poles you just tap the grip from the bottom to remove it.  A pair of vice grips loosely around the pole work well when tapped with a hammer.
post #4 of 25
If you're still having trouble getting them off, a trick we used at the shop I worked at years ago was to slide the shaft of a very small flat-blade screwdriver down between the pole and the grip about 2-3 inches deep.  Then take a can of spray silicone and attach the straw application tip, slide the straw into the gap you have created with the screwdriver, and give it a short blast of silicone.  You should now be able to twist the grip off quite easily.  If it's still too tight, repeat the process on the opposite side of the pole shaft from the first application.

The residual silicone will make it easier to slide the grip back on when you're done, and once you're finished you'll find that it sets up tight.
post #5 of 25
Soak the grips in hot water for a few minutes, this works with both graphite and ally.  I did a pair of Swix graphite at the weekend and found i had to hold teh shaft with a pair of grips (with a cloth to prevent shaft damage) and then work the grip off by twisting as there seemed to be some adhesive on it
post #6 of 25
Blowing compressed air in from the bottom, ala bike handle bar grips, works well.

What tools do you use to cut a composite shaft? Not a pipe cutter like for alu, I presume. I've been worried a saw would splinter the shaft, even if taped around where I was cutting.
post #7 of 25
Dremel.  <zing>-> done.
post #8 of 25
But of course! Not owning one, that didn't come to mind.
post #9 of 25
Actually the junior hacksaw with a new blade worked perfectly on the swix graphite.  I had been worried it might tear a bit but no problem
post #10 of 25
Fortunately my poles have lasted quite a while so I have not had to shroten my poles in a while.  To remove the grips I would put a pole inbetween the frame and a partially opened door and pull the pole end.  I have cut both CF poles and bike equipment using a fine hacksaw blade.  I know there is a CF hacksaw blade, but metal has worked fine for me.
post #11 of 25
 When cutting a carbon shaft pole be sure to wrap tape around the shaft next to the cut. This will help prevent splintering of the carbon.
post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
We have a winner (sort of),
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Soak the grips in hot water for a few minutes, this works with both graphite and ally.  I did a pair of Swix graphite at the weekend and found i had to hold teh shaft with a pair of grips (with a cloth to prevent shaft damage) and then work the grip off by twisting as there seemed to be some adhesive on it
I used ScotsSkier's thought of holding the poles with a pair of grips. First, I wrapped many layers of tape just below the handle to protect the graphite. I used locking pliers, which may not be available to many, and griped the shaft. Simply twisting the pole grip broke the adhesive free and the removal was easy after that. Didn't need the hot water.

A caution is that using locking pliers can overtighten and crush the shaft when being put into the locked position, so be very careful in making the right adjustment.

Graphite is cut easily with a hacksaw blade, but, do wrap a couple layers of tape around the shaft before the cut.

Thanks Bears for the thinking.
post #13 of 25
Goode poles have a removable ferule (basket and tip), and can (should) be cut from the bottom.
post #14 of 25
My poles had an allen screw that was to be loosened and there was about a 1 inch slot you could stick a blade in to loosen them a bit ... these were supposed to be Goode "adjustable"" poles but it was still a Royal PIA.  There was a bit of glue to hold the rubber grip to the shaft.

Tried the hot water and then one of the Bears came up with putting them in a door jamb and giving them a few tugs.  It worked, but I like the vise grip and hammer tap suggestion ... not too tight with the vise grips.

I used a metal blade for a hack saw ... and cut them like 4 or 5 times .... and each time I cut them they were still too short! 

Actually, I did do them in 4 or 5 shots and just took off like 1/16 each shot ..... and patience played out cause' I was real happy with them at the end.  Once the grips were loose they were easy to get tight again so it wasn't as big a pain as it sounds.

I recommend that you switch poles with someone who has shorter poles than it seems like you need.  What got me started on this was I accidentally switched poles with wifey who has the same poles.  They were too short but ... the swing on steeper slopes was easier ... so I ended up with a pole that "by the book" was a bit short ...  but I freaking love them.  But try it with someone with a slightly shorter pole to get the feel.  I noticed that with the "by the book" pole ... upside down .. I had a tendency to slightly lift my hand on each "plant/reach/touch" ... take your time ... do a few cuts and you will be real happy with the finished length.
post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Goode poles have a removable ferule (basket and tip), and can (should) be cut from the bottom.
Looking at the poles and knowing the above, it's not intuitive on how you would do it. Could you expand?

I agree with Yuki about not taking too much off, but, taking off only 1/16 of and inch seems like much too little. I did 3/4 of an inch and that seems conservative.
post #16 of 25
I did it in several shots and ended up taking off .... probably, over an inch.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post



Looking at the poles and knowing the above, it's not intuitive on how you would do it. Could you expand?

I agree with Yuki about not taking too much off, but, taking off only 1/16 of and inch seems like much too little. I did 3/4 of an inch and that seems conservative.
 

put the basket end in a vice, not too tight, just enough so the basket assembly doesn't slide through, then all it takes is a big jerk. 
 
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post




put the basket end in a vice, not too tight, just enough so the basket assembly doesn't slide through, then all it takes is a big jerk
 

got anyone in mind.... 
post #19 of 25
I just got some Swix Alu. poles. Can't get the grips off. Tried the silicon thing , but my grips have a composite plastic molded in with the rubber and that chipped a little when I tried to pry with a screw driver. Boiled water and tried steaming them to no avail.

Did the vise grip and hammer thing. Unfortunately my handyman skills are about non existent off to the ski shop tomorrow.
post #20 of 25

 

 

Today I shortened the shafts of some ski poles.  Having never had the pleasure of working in a ski shop, I referenced this thread and also used my experience with golf club shafts.  The whole process is very easy.  I hope the photos help others. 

 

 

How To Remove Grips:

1) Use heat to loosen the glue holding the grip in place and make the grip more pliable.  Cover the grip with a baggie, squeeze out the air, and attach it in place with a rubber band. 

2) Boil water in a pot and turn off the flame.  Place the grip into a the pot of hot water for 5 minutes or until the glue is loose.  Then twist off the grip.  Using this method insures the grip will not be damaged.

How To Cut Graphite Shafts:

1) Cut the shaft to the correct length.  Wrap the shaft with two layers of masking or blue tape where you will cut to prevent splintering. If using a vice, use an old golf club grip (split down the middle) or a sponge to protect the shaft from scratching or cracking. 

2) Use a hack saw (with the correct blade) or a detail saw to cut the shaft.  It should only take a few seconds to cut through a graphite shaft.   If you have power tools, just be sure to use the right blade. 

How To Replace the Grip:

1) Put a little glue on the end of the shaft.  It probably isn't necessary, but the manufacturers do it (at least the poles I shortened today had glue).

2) Place the grip onto the shaft.  Some manufacturers have a mark used to align the grip for aesthetic purposes (keeping the name of the manufacturer on the side where others can see it). Tap the grip with a hammer to make sure the shaft is fully in.  You will feel and hear when the shaft reaches the end of the grip.  Alternatively, you can seat the grip by putting it on the end of the shaft, and banging it into the floor. 

How To Lengthen a Shaft

1) Golf clubmaking shops sell shaft extenders.  Measure the diameter of your ski pole shaft to make sure the diameter is the proper size for the shaft extenders you order.  There are several companies that manufacture both golf and ski pole shafts with similar diameters, so you should be able to order something that fits.

2) Glue the extenders into the shafts and wait until the glue sets.  Cut to size. 

3) Replace the ski pole grips.

 

10001000

 

1000


Edited by quant2325 - 12/3/12 at 8:18pm
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Goode poles have a removable ferule (basket and tip), and can (should) be cut from the bottom.

I'm curious what the advantage of cutting from the bottom is?

+1 for jamming the grip in a door and yanking it off. It's never not worked the few times I've done it.
post #22 of 25

Did someone already say this?  A  lil trick that usually works for me is using a door.  Have a friend hold the door steady opened about 6"  Adjust accordingly.  Put the pole handle in the "V" formed at the top in the hinge side so the bottom of the handle is on the "V".  Grab pole firmly and pull straight down using your weight.  Slow and steady pressure - usually comes right off.  :)

 

What kind of grown man does not have a dremel? 

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skibum220 View Post

I'm curious what the advantage of cutting from the bottom is?
+1 for jamming the grip in a door and yanking it off. It's never not worked the few times I've done it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Goode poles have a removable ferule (basket and tip), and can (should) be cut from the bottom.

Door jams work, but I imagine the door frame or grip can become marred. If you don't care, why not? The Goode poles I have seen are not tapered, so perhaps it is just easier to cut from the bottom? A shaft with the same diameter means there are no issues with getting any part to fit properly once it goes back on the shaft.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat View Post

Did someone already say this?  A  lil trick that usually works for me is using a door.  Have a friend hold the door steady opened about 6"  Adjust accordingly.  Put the pole handle in the "V" formed at the top in the hinge side so the bottom of the handle is on the "V".  Grab pole firmly and pull straight down using your weight.  Slow and steady pressure - usually comes right off.  :)

 

What kind of grown man does not have a dremel? 

 

One who's neighbor does.

post #25 of 25

handy for removing grips and baskets: a block of wood 2"X3"X4"roughly with a hole bored through the length about 3/4" diameter and then cut the block along the length of the bore in the middle of the hole, then hinge the block where you cut it apart, you can now fit the block around the shaft inside the basket or grip, put the block in a vice, and hammer the shaft with a large rubber mallet. whew! I'd take a picture if I thought anyone was interested. the hinge is the thing.

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