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Questions about my stance, what to try next?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hello Boot Guys:
 
I would like to solicit some feedback on trying to stabilize my alignment.
 
Background: I have a pair of Diablo Race Pro 130 boots and after alignment (shaft adjustment with alignment of my knee using the plum bob technique at the Start Haus, so I am confident with my alignment in the boot).  I continue to have an issue with the center of my knee being well on the inside when the ski is loaded. I ski with a custom orthotic (made by my podiatrist) and my foot seems very stable. This only impacts my right leg.  I did have an injury to my right ankle many years ago, so I don’t know if this has impacted the stability of my right ankle and foot. I do not have the same problem when skiing in my Atomic RT Ti boots which baffles me.
 
I’ve been experimenting with cants under the bindings and although it seems to improve my edging, it does not solve the problem.
 
So, I am turning to you SME’s for input on what to try next. After doing a little research, I was wondering if my lower leg is rotating and if so, what options should I investigate next to stabilize it?

Any ideas?

Thanks
post #2 of 11
Calbearski,
Answering a few questions might help create a clearer picture of your situation.
 
When you stand on a hard surface in the boots does the plumb line from center of knee mass fall to same place on R and L boots?
 
Where is this relative to center mold seam or edge of boot sole?
 
Does the position  change more on one side when you “load” one side vs. the other?
 
What do you notice as a difference in R and L turns on snow?
 
 Does the difference occur early in the turn, in the middle of the turn, or at the end of the turn?
 
Which do you think is your better turn?
 
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
When you stand on a hard surface in the boots does the plumb line from center of knee mass fall to same place on R and L boots?

Yes, when I was checked for both right and left alignment, they are aligned the same.
 
Where is this relative to center mold seam or edge of boot sole?
 
The knee center of mass is slightly inside of the center mold line when standing on a flat hard surface.
 
Does the position  change more on one side when you “load” one side vs. the other?
 
The position changes more when making a left turn, when I make a right turn and load the uphill ski, I don’t get the same movement, the right knee doesn’t move toward the uphill edge as it does when I make a left turn.
 
What do you notice as a difference in R and L turns on snow?
 
On left turns, I notice I end up driving my right knee into an A frame and often the knee is hitting my uphill boot to get the same edging as when making a right turn and my left ski is on the outside of the turn.
 
Does the difference occur early in the turn, in the middle of the turn, or at the end of the turn?
 
The difference is mainly in the middle of the turn, the transition from flat ski to engaging the inside edge of my right ski is fine, it’s when the ski is loaded, I find I need to compensate by driving my knee into the hill more.
 
Which do you think is your better turn?
 
Right now, my right turns are better, since the left knee isn’t moving once I roll the ski onto it’s edge even though my right leg is the stronger of the two.
 
Additionally, I did a test recently where I mounted a level on the ski, and standing on a side hill with most of my weight on the right ski, checked the alignment with a plum bob and found the knee was well inside from where it was aligned in the static position.
 
Hope this helps, any ideas on what I could try next  would be appreciated.
 
Thanks
post #4 of 11
Have you been assessed for a leg length discrepancy?  92% of adult population have a LLD with 42% having greater than 10mm.  If you align a LLD on hard surface it may be possable to adjust the boots to symmetry but on snow there will be a lack of symmetry.
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hello Mike:

When I had my orthotics made, the podiatrist did some measurements to check that my knees and also my hips were on the same plane when standing on my orthotics on a flat surface, and there wasn't any significant discrepancy like the 10 mm you indicated, although I don't recall a specific number. That was the extent of any measurements.

Your thoughts?

Thanks
post #6 of 11
It sounds like you are having some internal rotation at the hip when weighting that leg---we couldn't possibly remedy this without seeing you.  Try to get to an on snow assessment center and let them look at the total package.
post #7 of 11
Calbearski,
Based on the picture your answers are creating there are a few things that might be helpful though I would like to see if I can get a bit more information.
 
In the question I asked which is copied below I was more interested in what happened while standing on a hard flat surface as opposed to while skiing.  
“Does the position change more on one side when you “load” one side vs. the other?”
 
To follow up on that question. If I stated that; it is easier for you to find and maintain pressure on the ball of the left foot than the right foot would you agree with me?
 
The best way I can suggest for you to find the ball of the foot is not to do what most skiers do, which is to ‘roll the ankle’, but instead to slightly reduce pressure on your heels and raise the big toes which should leave the pressure on the balls of the feet.  If this description is sufficient in describing movements to bring pressure to the balls of the feet would you agree with the follow up question above? If the description is not clear I can try to refine it.
 
How often do you get on snow and when will the next time be?
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Ray:

It absolutely is easier to find and maintain pressure on the ball of the left foot. I am more than curious about what that means. 

I generally ski approx. 20 to 25 days each season and I will be going up tomorrow (Tuesday 12/22).  After that, it will be after Christmas.

Thanks,

Bruce
post #9 of 11
Bruce,
Based on the picture created by your answers there are a few things that are worth experimenting with.
 
One would be adding some posting on the inside at the heel of the right  footbed. Most shops have what is called a varus wedge (little rubber thingies) which you can duct tape to the heel of the footbed thick side inside. They usually come in sm, med and lg. I would think at least a medium would be a place to start.
 
The other thing you can and should try deals with the cuff. Is it set as far as it can be to the outside? If not that would be a good start.
 
You should also experiment with some extra padding between the liner and the shell on the inside of the right boot cuff above the ankle bone. Trail maps can work well for this. If you are a little handy you can cut an inverted U shape so it fits around the ankle bone. Pressure on that bone would hurt!
 
Basically you want to fill the space that your leg is rotating into and the wedge under the inside of the heel helps support the rear foot in a more neutral position as when the rear foot pronates it inhibits the ability to maintain pressure on the ball of the foot.
 
I have found that raising the big toe instead of ‘rolling the ankle’ as you begin a turn is a much more effective way to get and maintain pressure to the ball of the foot. So give that a try as well.   

Hope you see this before you go.
 
Have fun look forward to hearing the results.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hello Ray:

Thanks for the great feedback.  I have experimented with angling the boot cuff, and adding padding around the ankle and it has added stability.  I will also be experimenting with a varus wedge. Your feedback is definitely taking me in the right direction.  I find that I can extend my right leg and maintain edge hold through a left turn without needing to drive my knee into the hill.
I greatly appreciate your help, thanks again.

Bruce
post #11 of 11
Bruce,
Glad to help point you in the right direction. With the information you provided it was not that difficult to offer some suggestions.
 
It helps when you realize that skiing happens from the snow up and that the movements you described were just the compensations necessary to maintain balance. If the proper equipment adjustments are made the need to compensate disappears and balance is easy. If proper adjustments are not made a lot of time is wasted working on exercises and drills that many would offer to solve the problem.
 
 Keep us informed of your progress as I am sure there are more things that can be suggested that will allow for better balance and control.
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