EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › A few questions for you guys
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A few questions for you guys

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I've got a couple of problems with my boots (actually, I guess I'm the one with the problems) and am planning on going to see a boot fitter (a 3 hour drive) the first of january to try to get some things fixed.  I'd like to have some idea of what to ask for and/or expect, so I wanted to describe it all to you guys first.

1.  When I walk bare footed, only the outside of my feet contact the ground.  Literally, my big toes do not always touch the ground.  I was a very serious soccer player back in the day, and the docs said I messed them up by practically living in cleats.  As long as I wear shoes I don't notice the pain, but I literally can't walk 100 feet without shoes on or the outsides of my feet hurt.  I'm assuming this would naturally cause me to ski more on my outside edges, right?  There are times where I look down and swear it looks like my inside edges aren't even contacting the snow when I'm standing still.

2.  My shells are the correct size when I take the liners out and put my feet in... I've got about 2 fingers width.  My boots are size 26.0, my liners say 26.5.  Dalbello proton 8s.  I've skied them about 20 days, so they should have packed out by now.  They have never been heat molded.  When I put my feet in just my liners, it crushes my pinky toe, literally pushing it at least into the next toe, and sometimes actually under it.  When I put everyhting back together (in the shells) the problem gets a little worse.  Just wearing my liners is uncomfortable.  Any ideas?  By the way, this problem is mostly resolved if I take the footbeds out and don't wear socks. 

I plan on having the guy check my canting and all that, since I've broke my right knee a total of 6 times, and have a pretty severe case of osgood schlatter... I'm one of the unfortunate cases that doesn't outgrow it.  I'm 26, 190 pounds, 5'8.  Big calves, very strong legs in general.  Volkl AC3s with marker wide ride ipt bindings.  Hopefully that gives you all the info you could want.  I live in eastern north carolina, ski at wintergreen.

Jeremy
          
post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by bayleaf36ff View Post

2.  My shells are the correct size when I take the liners out and put my feet in... I've got about 2 fingers width. 

I plan on having the guy check my canting and all that, since I've broke my right knee a total of 6 times, and have a pretty severe case of osgood schlatter... I'm one of the unfortunate cases that doesn't outgrow it.  I'm 26, 190 pounds, 5'8.  Big calves, very strong legs in general. 

Jeremy
          
"Osgood-Schlatter disease usually goes away with time.  Only rarely does Osgood-Schlatter disease persist beyond the growing stage." quoted from Family Doctor.org.
(Patella tendon insertion problem)  If you have large calfs you will "backseat" most of the time, hanging on your quads, over loading your patella tendon.

Also, if you have large calf's your knees will be pushed forward and as you extend your torso this will push your toes up into the front (narrower part)of the toebox.  It may do this just standing in the boots.

One last thought:  Dependent on how big your fingers are your boot may or may not be the right size.  My two fingers are over 3/4 of an inch thick---not a good shell fit.
post #3 of 9
Jeremy,

As you know, you have some alignment issues.  Has anyone ever mentioned that you are bowlegged?  It was not clear whether you have a custom foot bed or stock insole?  It is best to do as much alignment correction with a custom foot bed or orthotic first and then make appropriate cuff adjustments to align your leg inside the cuff of your boots.  From there under the bidding chats or boot sole planning to get you standing and skiing flat on the snow might be recommended.

Also, keep in mind the finger test is only for checking length and does not necessarily mean your are in the correct shell or boot.  If your pinky toe is curling under in the liner have your boot fitter stretch the liner ( probably the shell too) and that may help.  You should be comfortable in the liner outside of the shell and you need to make sure the shell is wide enough to accommodate the liner and your foot.

Part of your discomfort is from a volume issue which is why taking out the foot bed and not wearing a sock helps.

Good luck,

Don
post #4 of 9
 Do you have high arches and insteps? Sometimes soccer players get a bump on top of their instep from years of playing....do you?
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

As for my osgood schlatter, as I said in my original post, I'm unfortunate enough to be a case that didn't resolve.  Typically it's gone by the end of puberty, or somewhere during high school.  I'm 26 and still have it.  The doc said it probably won't resolve since it hasn't already. 

 

I would say I have a pretty thick instep, but according to the podiatrist, I have short, flat, wide feet. 

 

Don, I completely agree that my issue is a volume problem.  I'm trying to put too much foot into a liner that is too tight.  Is that as easy as it sounds... "Just get it stretched"?  So I should start with a custom foot bed to try to fix my other issues, and then get the liner/shell stretched to accomodate my toes?   

post #6 of 9
Jeremy,

Without seeing your foot and ski boots I cannot say for sure how easy it will be, however, yes it should be able to be done.  Fixing your situation will greatly come down to your bootfitter and his (or her) experience.

I believe everyone should have a replacement footbed instead of the stock insole that is sold with all ski boots.  You mentioned that you have been told you have a flat foot, assuming that is true, be careful and make sure your boot fitter can accurately analyze your foot and recommend the correct footbed for your foot.  (If you get a footbed with to much arch it will cause a 'golf ball' affect under your arch and will create another set of issues).  You may even need to see a Podiatrist for an Orthotic, the only reason I say this is because you mentioned you cannot walk without shoes or it hurts.  That being said, an experienced boot fitter should be able to set you up with the correct bootbed.  Regardless...once again make sure you see a very experienced boot fitter, for me that means over 5 years of full-time experience, preferable more.

As far as the boot and liner stretching, I would pull the boot shell apart with a boot spreader, place your foot inside the shell and see how much room - or lack there of - you have, both before and after stretching the shell to make sure the shell is stretched enough.  The liner should be the easy part - get it stretched, try it on and see how it feels.

You mentioned that you have big calves but did not say you were having any pain issues so I assume that is not an issue at this time.

Keep in mind you may not hit the nail on the head with your issues right away, but you should feel a big improvement right away.

Good luck,

Don
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

I'm planning to go and see this guy... http://www.candrski.com/bootfitters.html  Like I said, it's a pretty good drive, but he's the only one I know of around here.  I don't think there's anyone here who is a "full time bootfitter".  This shop charges 125 for a custom footbed.  I guess I'll start there and see what I get.  Hopefully the footbed will fix most of my problems and I won't have to get anything stretched.   

 

I did experience some pretty crazy calf pain for a while, but I attributed it to over tightening my boots.  When I would get on a lift, my calves would hurt pretty bad.  I would just loosen my buckes before getting on and it seemed to help a lot.  I'm assuming the weight of the ski dangling was shoving the back of the boot into my calf?    

post #8 of 9

Jeremy,

The custom footbed is to (help) align and stabilize the foot inside the boot, it will probably not fix any width issues that you are having. Do not be afraid to get your boots stretched. done properly it will not hurt the boot and will help your situation. You need a full in-person evaluation with your boot fitter and no doubt will benefit from several adjustments to make your boots fit right. 

I would not get your hopes up that a custom footbed is the cure-all.

Don

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the info... I'm looking forwad to getting all the adjustments made.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ask the Boot Guys
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › A few questions for you guys