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Your thoughts on falling. - Page 3

post #61 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by guroo270 View Post



If you read the book, Golf Is Not a Game of Perfect, you will get your answer in the first 50 pages.  

 
Given that it is highly unlikey that I will read that book before I have use for the information, please, tell me, what does it say?

clearly, reverting to survival habits when frightened is part of the equation.

Once, rock climbing on a dome in Yosemite, just high angle slab scrambling really, the angle went beyond my comfort zone and I was sure my shoes were slipping, and I leaned in and of course it got worse, and I tried to find a better hold and it got worse yet. Then I said to myself: relax, trust the shoes, and instantly I was just fine, gripping well and balanced in a relaxed position. ahhhh, deep breath.
post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post



Given that it is highly unlikey that I will read that book before I have use for the information, please, tell me, what does it say?

clearly, reverting to survival habits when frightened is part of the equation.

Once, rock climbing on a dome in Yosemite, just high angle slab scrambling really, the angle went beyond my comfort zone and I was sure my shoes were slipping, and I leaned in and of course it got worse, and I tried to find a better hold and it got worse yet. Then I said to myself: relax, trust the shoes, and instantly I was just fine, gripping well and balanced in a relaxed position. ahhhh, deep breath.
 

It (very) basically says that you can perform to your potential in any situation, the only thing that makes you perform worse when you are under duress is your mind.  If you can make up your mind, and do not start your turns before you have MADE UP YOUR MIND, then follow through as sure as ever.  You could very easily parallel this book to skiing as he talks about obstacles that you would like to avoid, and if you are remotely thinking about the obstacles as opposed to where you WANT to go, you will go towards those obstacles.  It also is a VERY easy read, so you could read it before you are going to need the info.
post #63 of 69
thanks guroo, appreciate that and can relate.

why do skiers perform well when they are showing off to a member of the opposite sex, is another phenom. Because they are totally positive, as in:

not: I don't want to fall here or hit that rock, damn, uh oh, watch out.
instead: watch this, I'm gonna' nail this line next to the rock for ya! Oh, yeah;,sending

Quote:
Originally Posted by guroo270 View Post




It (very) basically says that you can perform to your potential in any situation, the only thing that makes you perform worse when you are under duress is your mind.  If you can make up your mind, and do not start your turns before you have MADE UP YOUR MIND, then follow through as sure as ever.  You could very easily parallel this book to skiing as he talks about obstacles that you would like to avoid, and if you are remotely thinking about the obstacles as opposed to where you WANT to go, you will go towards those obstacles.  It also is a VERY easy read, so you could read it before you are going to need the info.
post #64 of 69
I'll echo Ghosts idea about how children learn to walk. Isn't it a combination of developing muscles and nervous system combined with observation and trial and error.
On the other hand, reading this thread has me thinking I,m glad our military doesn't teach pilots to fly by telling them to go out and find and exceed their limits. I'm pretty sure most fighter pilots perform at a very high skill level, very close to their limits, yet they don't crash on a regular basis.
post #65 of 69
 Falling sucks and I avoid it. In fact, a lot of places I ski, a fall could mean serious injury. Falling at steep chutes such as at Whister or at Kicking Horse means you aren't stopping any time soon and there are rocks and drop offs below you.

Saying that, I did fall a lot more when I was an advanced skier and learning to ski variable snow, steeps, bumps, etc. However these falls were usually going only at a moderate pace. Unless you are trying  a new skill, I think that the majority of expert skiers tend to fall less now than when they were advanced skiers. It doesn't mean that you aren't pushing yourself, it means that you are more skilled.
post #66 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by seattle_sun View Post

 Falling sucks and I avoid it. In fact, a lot of places I ski, a fall could mean serious injury. Falling at steep chutes such as at Whister or at Kicking Horse means you aren't stopping any time soon and there are rocks and drop offs below you.

Saying that, I did fall a lot more when I was an advanced skier and learning to ski variable snow, steeps, bumps, etc. However these falls were usually going only at a moderate pace. Unless you are trying  a new skill, I think that the majority of expert skiers tend to fall less now than when they were advanced skiers. It doesn't mean that you aren't pushing yourself, it means that you are more skilled.
 

The dread sliding fall, or death slide....is unique among falls.

It takes time to develop so you have a while to think of what deep sh^& you are in.

I was in one once that was very noisy, helmet and skis clattering over rock, and then it was completely silent. I remember thinking: whew, all that noise is gone. but what it really meant was that I was in the free fall part of the slide.
post #67 of 69
 Yeah, one time I caught an edge in the West Cirque at Whistler. One ski popped off, started to rag doll and then landed on my back. Like you said,  just the sound of gore tex on snow and sliding uncontrollably head first. I was watching rocks and avalanche debris whiz by and finally stopped at the bottom. A guy skis up to me and says, "Dude are you ok? You were BOOKING!".
post #68 of 69
My 2 cents worth ... I hate to fall - especially in deep powder.  Doing a face plant in deep powder wherein you wind up 15' down the hill with your skis impaled in the slope uphill is the worst. Trying to crawl uphill thru waistdeep powder is impossible and once this happens to me, I'm totaly gassed.

Too, I find that with ones ability to ski better a nd better there is the element of speed; i.e. the better one skiis the faster one skiis and thus the element of speed increases the risk for injury when falling - seldom a good idea.
post #69 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57 View Post

My 2 cents worth ... I hate to fall - especially in deep powder.  Doing a face plant in deep powder wherein you wind up 15' down the hill with your skis impaled in the slope uphill is the worst. Trying to crawl uphill thru waistdeep powder is impossible and once this happens to me, I'm totaly gassed.

Too, I find that with ones ability to ski better a nd better there is the element of speed; i.e. the better one skiis the faster one skiis and thus the element of speed increases the risk for injury when falling - seldom a good idea.

I used to use arlberg straps, nylon foot harness kind of deal that holds your ski to your foot after it releases. My thinking was exactly what you mentioned. If I fall and release, I want my ski right there.

I was scolded for increasing the danger in a sluff or beating myself to a pulp with a windmilling ski. I only hooked the straps on in deep snow, so taking a beating in a sliding fall was not an issue. getting dragged under by it was a problem. And as much as I take  my skis on and off on the hill for boot packs and crossing rocky ridges, I was getting gapped when I fussed with the damn straps. So I ditched them and like most Squaw skiers, figure I can go the season without releasing.

If you expect to be in a position to help someone in deep powder, you have to stay above them for the same reason. You want to show them how to ski it, or where, but you simply can't. Strongest skier goes last.
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