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WHAT FACTORS CREATE THE "PERFECT RUN"

Poll Results: What factor(s) do you find creates the perfect run.

Poll expired: Dec 20, 2009 This is a multiple choice poll
  • 21% of voters (18)
    snow quality (explain)
  • 20% of voters (17)
    uncrowded
  • 12% of voters (11)
    steepness
  • 3% of voters (3)
    grooming
  • 9% of voters (8)
    scenery, natural beauty
  • 3% of voters (3)
    high speed potential
  • 9% of voters (8)
    the company you keep, high fives all around kinda' run
  • 3% of voters (3)
    lots of air, huckability, stomache churning drops
  • 7% of voters (6)
    other ( specify)
  • 9% of voters (8)
    difficulty, extreme challenge met and mastered
85 Total Votes  
post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

What makes the perfect run, the run that makes you say: that was as good as any run I've ever had.

Yesterday there was a gate dropping (so to speak) on KT. The first 50 people spread all over the mountain to find their 'perfect run'.

I based my line on the fact that I was not in the first few chairs. I went to my second choice to go for fresh over any other consideration.

I got into one of the classic lines with not a soul. no one to be seen, in front of me, behind, or to the side. It was two feet of fresh, early in the morning, and no skiers around. It was the solitude and the perfect snow that made it a run as good as any I've skied.

(funny aside: I followed the line of two guys that had hiked it a few days ago, when it was closed, and was one of the major lines on the mountain. I could just see the tracks in the feet of new.)

post #2 of 18
I could select virtually every option in the poll.  There's been a bunch of runs that stand out in my mind as being "sweet" / "perfect" / whatever-adjective-you-choose.  I've had great runs on ice...  first time you realize how much grip you can get from a good turn on ice is pretty eye-opening.  My first trip down Stowe's Goat (narrow, steep, obstacle-filled bump run) and Aspen's Highlands Bowl was memorable just from the confidence-inspiring point of view (even though I'm sure I didn't ski either with flawless technique).  I still remember every detail of my first ever powder day (President's Day Monday, year 2000, at Cannon Mt., New Hampshire).
post #3 of 18
It's whatever run I'm doing right now.  Well, when I'm actually doing a run, which of course I'm not at the moment.

But really, ski in the moment.  Make every run perfect.  Don't be nostalgic for runs past; don't anticipate the runs to come.  Enjoy this one.  
post #4 of 18
I voted for several options, but the one you don't have listed specifically is terrain features/ obstacles.
post #5 of 18
No friends on a powder day
post #6 of 18
It's always great to have amazing snow & no crowds, but really for me it comes down to if I have nailed the run I'm currently on regardless of conditions (e.g. skiied it the way *I* want to). That might be on crud. I can have a 'bad' run on good snow :) Of course I prefer good snow though :P
post #7 of 18
I think the perfect run as just as much about what you bring to it as what the mountain provides. $.02
post #8 of 18
Uncrowded, steep, beautiful, high speed (actualized potential), other.

other includes being long enough to feel like you've reached a sort of level of what for lack of a better term I'll call a physical active working pace, ie. a pace you can keep up, but if you were working any harder you would be out of breath.

Then again, having your heart pounding at 20 to 40 beats per minute above your theoretically possible heart rate when you reach the bottom is fun too.
post #9 of 18
sounds like East Face, eh?  that's certainly been a perfect run for me many times... a great place to open it up and fly down a wide open untouched face.

a major factor in my next perfect run will be the fact that i haven't skied in awhile.  i know the next time i get to ski squaw i'll be so happy that i will probably become emotional.  i anticipate that being a perfect run.

when i think of the best runs of my life, one of the first that comes to mind was the first lap of my 25th birthday.  i had broken my hand that january and missed about a month of skiing.  later that season, i re-fractured my hand on the day before my birthday (in april).  i didn't care about the injury, but was instantly devastated that i wouldn't get to ski on my birthday (a multi-foot pow day).  i went to the doctor and he wrapped it up and gave me the green light to ski!  the next day i lined up for KT and went straight to Oly chairline.  i'll never forget bouncing through 2-3 feet of pow with my hand in a cast not caring what happened.  i was so happy to be skiing and will never forget that run.

(the best part of that run was that i got tripped up right before one of the big roll-overs... as i flew through the air in the middle of what would normally be a catastrophic high-speed fall i remember thinking "i'll be safe no matter where i land because there's so much fresh snow!")

that brief instant of being care-free while flying through the air with a broken hand was magic...

thanks for asking a question that was so fun to answer.
post #10 of 18
Anytime I am skiing and not working.  That is the perfect run for me.  It's all good. 
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
definitely: take an open face: add a rocky ferete down the middle, a cliff band across the crux, a grove of trees half way down, a gulley exit. yep, works for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

I voted for several options, but the one you don't have listed specifically is terrain features/ obstacles.
 






exactly right! east face. at first I read this, I thought, yeah, but then I noticed I hadn't really given it away. nice call.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahroy View Post


sounds like East Face, eh?  that's certainly been a perfect run for me many times... a great place to open it up and fly down a wide open untouched face.

a major factor in my next perfect run will be the fact that i haven't skied in awhile.  i know the next time i get to ski squaw i'll be so happy that i will probably become emotional.  i anticipate that being a perfect run.

when i think of the best runs of my life, one of the first that comes to mind was the first lap of my 25th birthday.  i had broken my hand that january and missed about a month of skiing.  later that season, i re-fractured my hand on the day before my birthday (in april).  i didn't care about the injury, but was instantly devastated that i wouldn't get to ski on my birthday (a multi-foot pow day).  i went to the doctor and he wrapped it up and gave me the green light to ski!  the next day i lined up for KT and went straight to Oly chairline.  i'll never forget bouncing through 2-3 feet of pow with my hand in a cast not caring what happened.  i was so happy to be skiing and will never forget that run.

(the best part of that run was that i got tripped up right before one of the big roll-overs... as i flew through the air in the middle of what would normally be a catastrophic high-speed fall i remember thinking "i'll be safe no matter where i land because there's so much fresh snow!")

that brief instant of being care-free while flying through the air with a broken hand was magic...

thanks for asking a question that was so fun to answer.


 
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


exactly right! east face. at first I read this, I thought, yeah, but then I noticed I hadn't really given it away. nice call.

 

i told you i'd be keeping track of things while i was gone ;)

glad you guys got such a good KT opening...
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
A run today had a lot of the good stuff. 

It was illusive; patrol opening it was touch and go.

It had nature in a power time. It was super windy; taking off skis for the hike, the wind nearly took one away. promise of wind buff and sugar. high energy place.

It had amazing terrain and scenery. Put the skis back on on the edge of a peak, the wind made a rediculous drift around the rock, you skied it toward the chute. wierd looking, twisting and turning,  and totally silent running.

It had the fear factor. Approaching the entry, (at this point in the hike you are committed, no way out) it was scary, knife edge cornice, holly sh@# am I going to have to drop 20 ft. into this. walked to the edge thinking any second it's all going to crack off. do the patrol know it's like this? Got a look, tiny drop, no problem.

Only one track in, and on another line. It was solitude.

First turn 50 degrees, wind crust, second turn wind buff and into powder for the main chute section. big side hill turns off the nose, ripping into the gulley...... yeah, it had snow conditions, steepness, terrain, and length (1500 vert,)

I'll never know perfect, but a freakin' great run! get some guys!
post #14 of 18
hmmm.... knowing you it's hard not to say the pallies.  that was my first instinct 5 words into it.

i'm still pretty sure that's what it was.... main or burma would be my first two guesses, main based on the committment factor. 

i guess McConkey's Shoulder is also possible, but i'll stick with my original assessment. 

either way, a great story..... glad somebody's gettin some.

it's possible to get the perfect run every day if you really try.  tell folks i say high.
post #15 of 18
The perfect run has 'IT'.  That run may be a green or blue or black or purple but 'IT' happens.  The day may be bluebird, nuking, or whiteout, but something clicks in; the internal happy face factor goes right off the meter.  The run may be serviced by a Gazelle helicopter or a rope tow, the view may be the alps or a parking lot; but you in that moment have been touched by God (or whatever you believe in) and given something very special.  That is 'IT'. 

A really great thing in our sport is that 'IT' may happen again on the next run.
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahroy View Post


hmmm.... knowing you it's hard not to say the pallies.  that was my first instinct 5 words into it.

i'm still pretty sure that's what it was.... main or burma would be my first two guesses, main based on the committment factor. 

i guess McConkey's Shoulder is also possible, but i'll stick with my original assessment. 

either way, a great story..... glad somebody's gettin some.

it's possible to get the perfect run every day if you really try.  tell folks i say high.


 

Reverse Traverse and the first runs of the season on Headwall, therefore: SL$%^^&t

Sades are skiing very hard.  South west winds for three separate episodes have made a huge cornice on main and national. The first section is concave, beyond degrees!  Then there's a crown to drop. Totally hairy. Extra looks good and Kitchen Wall looks epic. More perfect runs ahead if the weather gets clearer and that opens.

some snowboarders hiked part way to the shoulder and cut under it with a crappy traverse; pretty much destroyed the line (**&^*((^&^%#









Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

The perfect run has 'IT'.  That run may be a green or blue or black or purple but 'IT' happens.  The day may be bluebird, nuking, or whiteout, but something clicks in; the internal happy face factor goes right off the meter.  The run may be serviced by a Gazelle helicopter or a rope tow, the view may be the alps or a parking lot; but you in that moment have been touched by God (or whatever you believe in) and given something very special.  That is 'IT'. 

A really great thing in our sport is that 'IT' may happen again on the next run.

 

You know, the first thing I said to the guys was ho$%%y F&^^&ng S$$%%^^t!!!!!!  I think I said it twice for emphasis. Then I said: what an amazing gift.
 
(I was referring to the patrol opening when there were only about 8 of us left out there to ski all that space)

And then walking to the car I found a five dollar bill on the snow.

I took that fiver and went to the Chamoix and bought a beer with it.  I sat next to a beautiful girl and chatted. The bartender bought me the next beer,

Now that's what I'm talkin' about.
Edited by davluri - 12/15/09 at 10:09pm
post #17 of 18

Took me a bit to guess how the "percentage" computes. Apparently, my vote counted as 5! I picked 5 out of the list (since it's a multiple choice)!!!

So, there're perhaps ~15 people voted? Each picked more than one out of the list...

The result makes sense: just about everyone pick snow quality and lack of crowds. A crowded run on death cookies a perfect run it does NOT make!

I'll venture to guess the "percentage" voted on 1st and 2nd might actually be 100%.

Insight from the "dev team"? ;-)

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Ever since I wrote that the first turn was 50 degrees, I've had misgivings. I have no way to know that for sure and shouldn't say what I  don't know, especially if I'm OP.

Early season chutes are hella steep, and this was compounded by wind fill on the cornice, so I figured, but I don't know. It ususally skis more like 40 degrees.

Thanks for not calling me out on it. I would have had it coming.  Thanks for filling out the poll. I think it interesting, if obvious.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

A run today had a lot of the good stuff. 

It was illusive; patrol opening it was touch and go.

It had nature in a power time. It was super windy; taking off skis for the hike, the wind nearly took one away. promise of wind buff and sugar. high energy place.

It had amazing terrain and scenery. Put the skis back on on the edge of a peak, the wind made a rediculous drift around the rock, you skied it toward the chute. wierd looking, twisting and turning,  and totally silent running.

It had the fear factor. Approaching the entry, (at this point in the hike you are committed, no way out) it was scary, knife edge cornice, holly sh@# am I going to have to drop 20 ft. into this. walked to the edge thinking any second it's all going to crack off. do the patrol know it's like this? Got a look, tiny drop, no problem.

Only one track in, and on another line. It was solitude.

First turn 50 degrees, wind crust, second turn wind buff and into powder for the main chute section. big side hill turns off the nose, ripping into the gulley...... yeah, it had snow conditions, steepness, terrain, and length (1500 vert,)

I'll never know perfect, but a freakin' great run! get some guys!
 
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