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Is skiing an 'athletic' sport? - Page 3

post #61 of 83
I think you just explained athleticism.
To be able to take the act of skiing and to do it effortlessly ,with finesse is the mark of athleticism
post #62 of 83
There is lots of over weight people in many sports.  Skiing is Athletic.  If you check the calorie burn in an hour, in addition to regular calories burned, even for a light effort (not much effort just skiing down easy runs), it is 348 calories. This is average burn for going up and down chair lifts at a slower speed.  Moderate effort if about 450/hour and advanced or racing (really fast skiiers, lots of runs per hour), is 611/hour. This again is average burn going up and down chair lifts account for.  It uses all the large core muscles (quads and abs), which are the big calorie burners.  As people have fun and significant amout of the calorie burn comes from the muscle used to stay balanced on the ski alot of people don't realize the effort they are putting in, but a couple hours onthe slope light skiing will burn more then a 45 minute aerobic work out.  That's hard to beat.  If you wish to check my numbers I use www.nutritiondata.com for monitoring my daily intake and expenditures and find it highly accurate.

If you want to ski well you need to be in good shape or you can fake it and hurt for a few days as you will after a game of pick up foot ball or hockey if you don't do it always.  I love to skate too, but being as I don't skate all the time Like I did when I was young I hurt a little for a few days if I get too agressive on the rink.

The skating from run to run, walking up hill to get to lifts and other exertion put out in the cold temperatures is also very athletic and often more effort then coming down the slope feels like.
post #63 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post

There is lots of over weight people in many sports. 

Theres's one sport I haven't seen ANY overweight people: x-c skiing on skating skies.
 
It's definitely a nitch sport, if only for that reason. ;-)
post #64 of 83
Never saw any fat surfers, either.
post #65 of 83
lol, never seen any fat surfers?  I'd say you are fortunate as are we all, that heavy people shy away from putting on bathing suits!  I do know a couple of over weight people who partake in windsurfing though.  As an East coaster I have never been privy to the true surfing scene.  In most sports to the top of the game (those I see on television events), are typically abnormal specimens of fitness through years of dedication and sponsors for their craft.  I can picture many potential Hawian Surfing comics after this comment.
post #66 of 83
Lots of fat surfers...all you have to do is go to a longboard break and see a wide spectrum of physiques, ages, etc.

Shortboarding gets a bit different. 

The base-level fitness demands of surfing vs skiing are a lot different -- but in some ways they're similar in that when it comes to the skiing or to the riding a wave part, you can be really out of shape and perform better than just about anyone out there because of acquired skill.  I out-paddle a lot of surfers, but don't out-surf many.
post #67 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

Lots of fat surfers...all you have to do is go to a longboard break and see a wide spectrum of physiques, ages, etc.

Shortboarding gets a bit different. 

 
I guess ... haven't lived in California in 10 years, though, so maybe all those surfers I saw then have now hit middle age and are on longboards. :-)
post #68 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post



I guess ... haven't lived in California in 10 years, though, so maybe all those surfers I saw then have now hit middle age and are on longboards. :-)
 

Pretty much. :)  Or they're SUP-ing   
post #69 of 83
Try skate ski. It's skill intensive alright. But an overweight middle aged skater will have a heck of problem getting up the smallest hills. So they either stay in shape or quit.

The beauty of it is, if you keep doing it, you'll never get out of shape. So, no fat xc skiers. (except people who shuffle along on classic skis, the equivelant of the longboarders I suppose)
post #70 of 83
What he said.  Is tennis an athletic sport?  If you play hit and giggle tennis, no.  If you play two hours of hard serve and volley tennis every day against a 5.0 or better NTRP opponent, yes...



Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 The other thing to consider is that like any sport there are dedicated athletes and the casual participants. For example how many people get together and play pickup games of football or basketball or soccer or softball etc. Not all of them are athletes, yet it is an athletic activity. It takes a good deal of athleticism to ski well just as it takes a good deal of it to play pickup football well.  
post #71 of 83
Thread Starter 
I have to admit that I have never seen an obese x-country skier, even classic-style. Seeing obese alpine skiers is fairly common, even some good skiers. Outside of competitive venues, you really don't have to be in good shape  to partricipate succesfully or efficiently in downhill skiing. Gravity and chairlifts do the majority of the really hard work. There is no 'free lunch' in x-country skiing. 
post #72 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

Was reading some boot fitting threads and came accross a response to a question that was posted.

Skiinginjackson said,

"You'd be surprised how many skiers do nothing all year and jump on the slopes and ski 10K vert the first day.  Yet they expect zero discomfort below the hips.  Skiing is an athletic sport."

I am certainly not taking exception with this view and aggree with it as a general statement -- all except the part about skiing being an athletic sport. Judging by the waist line of the average skier you see on the hill today, I would say skiing CAN be an athletic sport, but for most people, it is an outdoor winter activity and not an atheltic one.

Obviously, a higher degree of athleticism is needed for competitive skiing and being in good physical condition makes things much easier and safer on your body and gives you stamina. But then you always seem to come accross someone who seems to dispel this notion. I am sure most have seen what I am referring to -- the overweight instructor or paunchy racer with a huge beer belly. Can't climb two decks of stairs in the lodge without being totally out of breath but they can totally rip it out on the slopes and can eat up a whole lot of vertical without tiring to any substatial degree.

I have wondered about this before and my opinion is there is something else going on here. IMO,  some people are gifted by nature with the perfect anatomy for skiing -- near perfect feet and knee alignment and a musculoskeletal system conducive to making efficient movements. In short, I think some people are physically built such that they need to work a lot less harder than others in order to achieve the same dynamic and efficient movements.

Your thoughts?



 

Here's my thought.   It's all about balance.  When you know how to ski, you don't get all tired out.  Just because one is "out of shape" doesn't mean they don't have great balance on skis!  

I don't think I'm going for a certain body type being better than another for skiing.   That sounds like a cop out to me.

If you ski hard, you go in spurts.  Ride chair, rest, ski spurt etc.   This type of exercise has been shown to be very good for you.  The hold your heart at a certain place for a long time is going by the way side from what I've heard.
post #73 of 83
 If your not getting tired skiing your doing it wrong.
post #74 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by KTMDirtFace View Post

 If your not getting tired skiing your doing it wrong.
 


post #75 of 83
is skiing athletic--athletic compared to what?  athletic is a relative term.  Compared to football/basketball--no, skiing is not athletic.

Compared to baseball/golf--sure, it is.
post #76 of 83
And the answer is, "It Depends."

For the 50 year old avid runner who has never been on skis or skates in their life the Bunny Hill will be more physically challenging and require more athleticism than a 5k run.

Conversely a 30 year old former college ski racer who is 50lbs overweight and hasn't exercised in 10 years will find the 5k run more physically challenging than a trip down some double black moguls.
post #77 of 83

Last season I would have said NO.  Skiing correctly has more to do with balance and movement.  But this season I'm using a new app for my iPhone call "Lose It".  When you pull up skiing as exercises I was amazed to see how many calories you burn (of course this is a guideline and average).  So, YES, skiing is athletic but if you have a great day and burn 1500 calories, don't make it up by drinking 6 pints of beer, eating french fries and nachos.  That will pack on the weight no matter what you do. 

In skiing, skill can make up for a complete lack of athleticism but not for long!!!

post #78 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

 YES, skiing is athletic but if you have a great day and burn 1500 calories, don't make it up by drinking 6 pints of beer, eating french fries and nachos.  That will pack on the weight no matter what you do. 

 


There goes my weight loss program.
post #79 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

 So, YES, skiing is athletic but if you have a great day and burn 1500 calories, don't make it up by drinking 6 pints of beer, 

In skiing, skill can make up for a complete lack of athleticism but not for long!!!

Thought that 12 oz. or 16 oz. curls were a form of weight training.  You are messing my exercise program.
post #80 of 83



People should read this whole thread before posting.  It has been thoroghly discussed.  Or maybe I should just unsubscribe. Check.
post #81 of 83
I would certainly agree that one's natural build comes into play when mastering this sport. You are addressing two issues.  Fitness and alignment.  Both compliment each other but fitness on a ski hill won't necessarily translate to fine skiing if alignment is flawed.  By alignment I am referring to the structure of the body, particularly the foot, and then the fit into the boot.  I've seen world class athletes (fit and skilled) who looked simply terrible on the slopes yet skied with my friend's wife who moved to our northern environs from the tropics and she was carving parallel turns (not fast and not aggressively) her first time on a hill (and only a couple of weeks even seeing snow!) because she had a pretty good foot and a footbed in her boot. 

Proper alignment (whether natural or corrected) will facilitate improved performance on skis.  Attempts to improve ones skiing is vastly benefited if there is a structurally sound fit into the boots.  Learning skill sets is fine as far as it goes. If properly aligned a skier will be able to utilize their skeletal structure to advantage and not have to rely on muscular compensation to negotiate oneself down a ski hill. 

EJL
post #82 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

 if you have a great day and burn 1500 calories, don't make it up by drinking 6 pints of beer, eating french fries and nachos.  That will pack on the weight no matter what you do. 
 

Hmmmph, speak for yourself. One of my favorite things about skiing is the chance to eat like an idiot and still drop pounds.
post #83 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post



"You'd be surprised how many skiers do nothing all year and jump on the slopes and ski 10K vert the first day.  Yet they expect zero discomfort below the hips.  Skiing is an athletic sport."

I would say skiing CAN be an athletic sport, but for most people, it is an outdoor winter activity and not an atheltic one.

Your thoughts?


 

Having just got back from Mammoth after three days of 8:30-3:30 skiing, I can tell you my legs are really tired, not sore, as I ride my bike daily to keep them in shape for skiing. That said, the way I ski is definitely an athletic sport. I mean when I look at myself at days end, my hair is plastered by sweat and I am spent. I work out all the time just to stay in shape for surfing and skiing, so yes, skiing can absolutely be an athletic sport. It just depends how much effort your putting into what you are doing.
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